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You searched for subject:(zoonotic Babesia). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Spencer, Angela M. Molecular and in vitro characterization of a Babesia divergens-like agent from eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) on Nantucket Island.

Degree: MS, Veterinary Parasitology, 2006, Texas A&M University

A Babesia sp. isolated from eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) is morphologically similar and genetically identical, based on SSU rRNA gene comparisons, to two agents responsible for human babesiosis in North America and is closely related to the European parasite, Babesia divergens. The ribosomal RNA (rRNA) internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S rRNA genes of Babesia isolates were sequenced and analyzed. The rRNA ITS region sequences of three isolates, one each from Kentucky, Massachusetts and Great Britain, considered Babesia divergens-like organisms, were compared to two Babesia microti isolates, two Babesia odocoilei isolates and a well defined Babesia divergens isolate. The two B. divergenslike isolates from North America shared identical rRNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequences, and the clones of these isolates clustered into one clade in three phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that these isolates are conspecific. In vitro comparison of host erythrocyte specificity between the rabbit Babesia sp. and B. divergens was employed to discriminate between the two organisms and to determine the usefulness of in vitro techniques for Babesia sp. characterization. In vitro growth of the rabbit Babesia sp. was supported in human and cottontail rabbit erythrocytes, but not in bovine cells. Babesia divergens in vitro growth was supported in human and bovine erythrocytes, but not in cottontail rabbit cells. Morphological characteristics and size differences also distinguished the two parasites from one another. The erythrocyte specificity and parasite size differences reported in this study agree with previous in vivo results and validate the use of in vitro methods for characterization of Babesia species. Advisors/Committee Members: Holman, Patricia J. (advisor), Craig, Tom M. (committee member), Magill, Clint (committee member), Snowden, Karen F. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Babesia; Babesia divergens; zoonotic Babesia

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APA (6th Edition):

Spencer, A. M. (2006). Molecular and in vitro characterization of a Babesia divergens-like agent from eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) on Nantucket Island. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4175

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spencer, Angela M. “Molecular and in vitro characterization of a Babesia divergens-like agent from eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) on Nantucket Island.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4175.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spencer, Angela M. “Molecular and in vitro characterization of a Babesia divergens-like agent from eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) on Nantucket Island.” 2006. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Spencer AM. Molecular and in vitro characterization of a Babesia divergens-like agent from eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) on Nantucket Island. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4175.

Council of Science Editors:

Spencer AM. Molecular and in vitro characterization of a Babesia divergens-like agent from eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) on Nantucket Island. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4175

2. Westwood, Mary Lynn. Infection Prevalence in a Novel Ixodes scapularis Population in Northern Wisconsin.

Degree: MS, Biological Sciences, 2017, Wright State University

Ixodes scapularis (i.e. the blacklegged or deer tick) is an important vector of emerging human pathogens. Over the past few decades, the incidence of blacklegged tick-associated zoonotic diseases have increased in accordance with an expansion of the blacklegged tick geographic range. Data concerning the infection prevalence of blacklegged ticks in this region is highly variable and fragmentary. Using a novel population of these ticks, constituting part of the invasion front in Vilas County, Wisconsin, I examined infection prevalence and vector aspects of their ecology. During the summer of 2016, I collected 461 blacklegged ticks and screened them using a standard polymerase chain reaction assay designed to identify three emerging zoonotic pathogens: Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia microti. The overall infection probability was 30%, 25%, and 14% respectively. The probability of co-infection ranged from 2-6% and the conditional probability of co-infection was not significant, indicating that there are yet to be detectable relationships between co-infecting pathogens. Blacklegged ticks were found in two main vegetation types: Oak and Northern Hardwood. These vegetation types are typical blacklegged tick habitat since they provide an adequate layer of leaf litter which is necessary to prevent desiccation. Overall, my work suggests that blacklegged ticks in this region may be an important source of pathogen pressure. This study aids in a better understanding of the geographic range increase of blacklegged ticks in North America and the entomologic risk posed by these novel populations. Advisors/Committee Members: Rooney, Thomas (Advisor), Peters, Jeffrey (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Ecology; Epidemiology; Public Health; Ixodes scapularis; ticks; diseases; Anaplasma phagocytophilum; Babesia microti; blacklegged tick; deer tick; vector; Ixodes; Anaplasma; Babesia; Borrelia burgdorferi; Borrelia; disease ecology; vector; vector-borne; zoonoses; zoonotic disease; Lyme

…Ixodidae.#It#is#an#obligate,#hematophagous#ectoparasite#that#harbors#numerous# zoonotic#pathogens… …have#yet#to#take#a#blood#meal#and#are#therefore#free#from#any#zoonotic#pathogens# that#are… …x28;e.g.#Borrelia#burgdorferi,#Anaplasma#phagocytophilum,#and#Babesia#microti)# are#not… …2011F2013).## # BABESIA#MICROTI# # Babesiosis#is#caused#by#the#protozoan#blood#parasite… …Babesia#microti.#Though# many#individuals#infected#with#B.#microti#remain#asymptomatic,#certain… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Westwood, M. L. (2017). Infection Prevalence in a Novel Ixodes scapularis Population in Northern Wisconsin. (Masters Thesis). Wright State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wright1503765696276339

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Westwood, Mary Lynn. “Infection Prevalence in a Novel Ixodes scapularis Population in Northern Wisconsin.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Wright State University. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wright1503765696276339.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Westwood, Mary Lynn. “Infection Prevalence in a Novel Ixodes scapularis Population in Northern Wisconsin.” 2017. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Westwood ML. Infection Prevalence in a Novel Ixodes scapularis Population in Northern Wisconsin. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Wright State University; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wright1503765696276339.

Council of Science Editors:

Westwood ML. Infection Prevalence in a Novel Ixodes scapularis Population in Northern Wisconsin. [Masters Thesis]. Wright State University; 2017. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wright1503765696276339

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