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1. McKenzie, Jane. Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri).

Degree: 2006, La Trobe University

Assessment of trophic interactions between increasing populations of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri) and fisheries in southern Australia is limited due to a lack of species specific demographic data and an understanding of the factors influencing population growth. To establish species specific demographic parameters a cross-sectional sample of New Zealand fur seal females (330) and males (100) were caught and individually-marked on Kangaroo Island, South Australia between 2000 and 2003. The seals were aged through examination of a postcanine tooth, which was removed from each animal to investigate age-specific life-history parameters. Annual formation of cementum layers was confirmed and accuracy in age estimation was determined by examination of teeth removed from individuals of known-age. Indirect methods of assessing reproductive maturity based on mammary teat characteristics indicated that females first gave birth between 4-8 years of age, with an average age at reproductive maturity of 5 years. Among reproductively mature females, age-specific reproductive rates increased rapidly between 4-7 years of age, reaching maximum rates of 70-81% between 8-13 years, and gradually decreased in older females. No females older than 22 years were recorded to pup. Age of first territory tenure in males ranged from 8-10 years. The oldest female and male were 25 and 19 years old, respectively. Post-weaning growth in females was monophasic, characterised by high growth rates in length and mass during the juvenile growth stage, followed by a gradual decline in growth rates after reproductive maturity. In contrast, growth in males was biphasic and displayed a secondary growth spurt in both length and mass, which coincided with sexual and social maturation, followed by a rapid decline in growth rates. Age-specific survival rates were high (0.823-0.953) among prime-age females (8-13 yrs of age) and declined in older females. Relative change in annual pup production was strongly correlated with reproductive rates of prime-age females and adult female survival between breeding seasons.

Subjects/Keywords: New Zealand fur seal; Kangaroo Island - South Australia; New Zealand fur seal - Population viability analysis; New Zealand fur seal - Breeding; Fisheries - South Australia - Environmental variability; Marine mammal populations; Pinniped; otarid; remote chemical immobilization; darting; anaesthesia; isoflurane; midazolam; zoletil; tiletamine-zolazepam; restraint; behavioral response; fecundity; pregnancy rates; progesterone; reproduction; reproductive failure; site fidelity; mortality; territorial; size dimorphism; life table; ageing; growth layer groups; re-colonization

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McKenzie, J. (2006). Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri). (Thesis). La Trobe University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au./thesis/public/adt-LTU20080509.121141

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McKenzie, Jane. “Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri).” 2006. Thesis, La Trobe University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au./thesis/public/adt-LTU20080509.121141.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McKenzie, Jane. “Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri).” 2006. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

McKenzie J. Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri). [Internet] [Thesis]. La Trobe University; 2006. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au./thesis/public/adt-LTU20080509.121141.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McKenzie J. Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri). [Thesis]. La Trobe University; 2006. Available from: http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au./thesis/public/adt-LTU20080509.121141

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Latrobe University

2. McKenzie, Jane. Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri).

Degree: 2006, Latrobe University

Assessment of trophic interactions between increasing populations of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri) and fisheries in southern Australia is limited due to a lack of species specific demographic data and an understanding of the factors influencing population growth. To establish species specific demographic parameters a cross-sectional sample of New Zealand fur seal females (330) and males (100) were caught and individually-marked on Kangaroo Island, South Australia between 2000 and 2003. The seals were aged through examination of a postcanine tooth, which was removed from each animal to investigate age-specific life-history parameters. Annual formation of cementum layers was confirmed and accuracy in age estimation was determined by examination of teeth removed from individuals of known-age.Indirect methods of assessing reproductive maturity based on mammary teat characteristics indicated that females first gave birth between 4-8 years of age, with an average age at reproductive maturity of 5 years. Among reproductively mature females, age-specific reproductive rates increased rapidly between 4-7 years of age, reaching maximum rates of 70-81% between 8-13 years, and gradually decreased in older females. No females older than 22 years were recorded to pup. Age of first territory tenure in males ranged from 8-10 years. The oldest female and male were 25 and 19 years old, respectively. Post-weaning growth in females was monophasic, characterised by high growth rates in length and mass during the juvenile growth stage, followed by a gradual decline in growth rates after reproductive maturity.In contrast, growth in males was biphasic and displayed a secondary growth spurt in both length and mass, which coincided with sexual and social maturation, followed by a rapid decline in growth rates. Age-specific survival rates were high (0.823-0.953) among prime-age females (8-13yrs of age) and declined in older females. Relative change in annual pup production was strongly correlated with reproductive rates of prime-age females and adult female survival between breeding seasons.

Subjects/Keywords: Pinniped; otarid; remote chemical immobilization; darting; anaesthesia; isoflurane; midazolam; zoletil; tiletamine-zolazepam; restraint; behavioral response; fecundity; pregnancy rates; progesterone; reproduction; reproductive failure; site fidelity; mortality; territorial; size dimorphism; life table; ageing; growth layer groups; re-colonization; New Zealand fur seal – South Australia – Kangaroo Island; New Zealand fur seal – Population viability analysis – South Australia – Kangaroo Island; New Zealand fur seal – Breeding – South Australia – Kangaroo Island; Fisheries – South Australia – Environmental aspects; Marine mammal populations – South Australia – Kangaroo Island

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McKenzie, J. (2006). Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri). (Thesis). Latrobe University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1959.9/468696

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McKenzie, Jane. “Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri).” 2006. Thesis, Latrobe University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1959.9/468696.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McKenzie, Jane. “Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri).” 2006. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

McKenzie J. Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri). [Internet] [Thesis]. Latrobe University; 2006. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.9/468696.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McKenzie J. Population demographics of New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri). [Thesis]. Latrobe University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.9/468696

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.