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You searched for subject:(worker heterogeneity). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. McKinley, Rayna L. A Comparative Study of Sex Salary Differentials for Full-time Workers with a Degree in Science or Engineering.

Degree: 2010, Texas A&M University

This thesis compares two datasets, the Science and Engineering Indicators 2006 (SEI) and the 1993 National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG), and looks at the impact of sex on full-time annual salary while controlling for different variables. The SEI provides a study based on data from 1999 about the sex effects on salary, adds controls, and records the changes in the effect of sex on salary. The SEI study finds after adding controls for worker heterogeneity and compensating wage differentials, women with bachelor's degrees earn 11.0% less, women with master's degrees earn 8.0% less, and women with doctoral degrees earn 8.4% less than their male counterparts. My analysis of the NSCG finds after adding controls, women with bachelor's degrees earn 18.5% less, women with master?s degrees earn 18.7% less, and women with doctoral degrees earn 15.3% less than their male counterparts. Additionally, in the NSCG and the SEI the field of degree impacted the sex effects the most for bachelor's and master's degree holders. This research is useful to study the difference between these datasets from different time periods. Specifically, the difference in the sex wage gap and in the changing importance of certain variables affecting the sex wage gap. Advisors/Committee Members: Ureta, Manuelita (advisor), Mayer, Adalbert (committee member), Clark, Carolyn (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: sex salary differentials; worker heterogeneity; compensating wage differentials; sex wage gap

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McKinley, R. L. (2010). A Comparative Study of Sex Salary Differentials for Full-time Workers with a Degree in Science or Engineering. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7749

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McKinley, Rayna L. “A Comparative Study of Sex Salary Differentials for Full-time Workers with a Degree in Science or Engineering.” 2010. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7749.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McKinley, Rayna L. “A Comparative Study of Sex Salary Differentials for Full-time Workers with a Degree in Science or Engineering.” 2010. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

McKinley RL. A Comparative Study of Sex Salary Differentials for Full-time Workers with a Degree in Science or Engineering. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2010. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7749.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McKinley RL. A Comparative Study of Sex Salary Differentials for Full-time Workers with a Degree in Science or Engineering. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7749

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Akbar, Rushde Elahi. Essays on Inequality and Productivity Growth Decomposition.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2017, York University

In this dissertation I analyze the effect of globalization on income inequality and aggregate productivity growth. In the first two chapters I develop a theoretical model to study the effect of international trade and foreign direct investments (FDI) on income inequality. In the model firms with heterogeneous productivity levels hire homogenous workers. The central feature of the model is the rent-sharing mechanism, by which firms share part of their profits with employees. As a result, income varies across workers because more productive firms pay more to their workers. In the first chapter, I focus on the case when all countries are symmetric in their aggregate productivity levels. I find that increased openness to trade increases welfare and at the same time reduces income inequality. At the same time, policies that facilitate FDI, although increase welfare, also lead to greater inequality. I also find that technological progress can result in higher inequality. In the second chapter I extend the model to asymmetric countries, in which one country (North) has greater aggregate productivity than the other country (South). As the two countries liberalize trade, both countries would observe a reduction in inequality, although the reduction is greater in the North and the income inequality differential between the two countries decreases. A unilateral tariff reduction by the South has a similar effect, but North is better off setting lower tariff as it observes lowest inequality compare to other cases. The third chapter analyzes aggregate productivity growth in Chilean manufacturing industry during 1979-96. I first decompose the aggregate growth into three major components: the inter-industry effect, whereby aggregate productivity increases due to expansion of the most productive industries; the intra-industry effect, whereby aggregate productivity increase due to expansion of the most productive firms within an industry; the technological effect, which reflects a symmetric increase in aggregate productivity across all firms and industries. I then estimate the contribution of each of these channels to Chilean aggregate productivity growth and find that technological progress was the major factor of the rapid aggregate productivity growth in Chile, while the contribution of inter-industry and intra-industry effects was minimal. Advisors/Committee Members: Stoyanov, Andrey (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Economics; Firm heterogeneity; Trade; FDI; Country asymmetry; Aggregate welfare; Employment distribution; Lorenz curve; Gini coefficient; Productivity growth decomposition; Value added per worker; Total factor productivity; Inter-industry reallocation; Intra-industry reallocation; Technology effect

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Akbar, R. E. (2017). Essays on Inequality and Productivity Growth Decomposition. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33496

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Akbar, Rushde Elahi. “Essays on Inequality and Productivity Growth Decomposition.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33496.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Akbar, Rushde Elahi. “Essays on Inequality and Productivity Growth Decomposition.” 2017. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Akbar RE. Essays on Inequality and Productivity Growth Decomposition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33496.

Council of Science Editors:

Akbar RE. Essays on Inequality and Productivity Growth Decomposition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33496

.