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You searched for subject:(white faced capuchins). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Mallott, Elizabeth K. Social, ecological, and developmental influences on fruit and invertebrate foraging strategies and gut microbial communities in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus).

Degree: PhD, Anthropology, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Primates are challenged by spatiotemporal variation in resource availability, and a central question in biological anthropology is how primates compensate for seasonal variation in food resources by adjusting their foraging strategies. How primates respond to variation in invertebrate availability has rarely been the focus of studies of primate foraging ecology. This dissertation examines the role of insectivory in shaping foraging strategies, elucidates developmental differences in invertebrate foraging strategies, and investigates the role of the gut microbiome in mediating dietary changes in white-faced capuchins. White-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) are an instructive model for examining the influences of changes in both fruit and arthropod availability on foraging strategies, as they devote a mean of 44.4% of feeding and foraging time to fruit, 38.0% to invertebrates, and 1.2% to vertebrates. A group of 20-22 white-faced capuchins was studied from January 2013 through January 2014 at La Suerte Biological Field Station in northeastern Costa Rica. Data was collected from individually recognizable adult and juvenile capuchins on diet (fruit, invertebrates, leaves, seeds, vertebrates, other), activity budget (feeding, foraging, traveling, resting, social, other), affiliative and agonistic interactions, nearest neighbor identity and distance, foraging subgroup size and spread, and geographic location at 2-minute intervals during 1-hour focal follows. Crown volume, diameter at breast height, number of food items in the crown, and average mass of five food items was collected for each tree in which the group fed for more than four minutes in order to assess patch productivity. Every two weeks, fruit resource availability was tracked using 25 100x4 meter phenology transects, and invertebrate resource availability was assessed using 10 composite insect traps and sweep net sites. Fecal samples were collected throughout the study period (n=225). DNA was extracted from fecal samples, and the COI mtDNA and the v3-v5 region of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified and sequenced to identify invertebrates consumed and the gut microbial community structure. The second chapter uses social network analysis to quantify group-level responses of white-faced capuchins to changes in food availability. The results indicate that increases in fruit abundance and decreases in patch density increase group cohesion (network density = 0.48±0.01 during periods of high abundance and patch density, network density = 0.40±0.07 during periods of low abundance and patch density), indicating that individuals may be decreasing group cohesion as fruit resources become less available in order to avoid feeding competition. Additionally, the abundance and distribution of invertebrate resources does not have a consistent effect on group cohesion, and the results suggest that capuchins do not see invertebrates as a uniform resource. In the third chapter of my dissertation, innovative molecular methods are used to identify the taxa of invertebrates present… Advisors/Committee Members: Garber, Paul A (advisor), Garber, Paul A (Committee Chair), Malhi, Ripan S (committee member), Stumpf, Rebecca M (committee member), MacKinnon, Katherine C (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: white-faced capuchins; foraging ecology; DNA metabarcoding; gut microbiome

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APA (6th Edition):

Mallott, E. K. (2016). Social, ecological, and developmental influences on fruit and invertebrate foraging strategies and gut microbial communities in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus). (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/93005

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mallott, Elizabeth K. “Social, ecological, and developmental influences on fruit and invertebrate foraging strategies and gut microbial communities in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus).” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/93005.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mallott, Elizabeth K. “Social, ecological, and developmental influences on fruit and invertebrate foraging strategies and gut microbial communities in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus).” 2016. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Mallott EK. Social, ecological, and developmental influences on fruit and invertebrate foraging strategies and gut microbial communities in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/93005.

Council of Science Editors:

Mallott EK. Social, ecological, and developmental influences on fruit and invertebrate foraging strategies and gut microbial communities in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus). [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/93005

2. Campbell, Jennifer Christine. White-faced Capuchins (Cebus capucinus) of Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica: Human Foods and Human Interactions.

Degree: 2013, Iowa State University

Cahuita National Park is an ecotourist destination in southeast Costa Rica. A troop of white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) living in the park was reported by park officials as being problematic due to their food-raiding behavior. In May-June 2012 and again in December 2012-January 2013 I collected behavioral information in the form of scan samples and human-monkey interactions to assess the frequency and severity of these interactions. Type of food consumed was also noted, as consumption of human foods has been shown to cause both demographic and behavioral changes in non-human primate populations. Anthropogenic food sources accounted for 18% for the total dietary budget for the Playa Blanca capuchins. Additionally, the consumption of human foods was associated with increased rates of agonism. Human foods were obtained by the capuchins in one of two ways: visitors feeding the monkeys (handouts) or monkeys taking food from visitors (raiding). I suggest it would be beneficial to both monkeys and tourists alike for the park to increase signage (Spanish and English) and to provide monkey-proof strong boxes in picnic areas so visitors can secure their food. Additionally, it is important strictly enforce the rules against feeding animals in the park to educate the public on the effects such behavior can have on the capuchins.

Subjects/Keywords: ethnoprimatology; human foods consumption; Cebus capucinus; primatology; white-faced capuchins; Behavior and Ethology; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Natural Resources Management and Policy

…2 capucinus (white-faced capuchins) that have adjusted to anthropogenic… …disturbances in part by utilizing “human” resources. Cebus capucinus White-faced capuchins are… …exploitation of this species, white-faced capuchins are designated as a “least concern” species by… …2012-2014). White-faced capuchins are confronted 2 3 news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/sci/tech… …In a study comparing a human-commensal group of white-faced capuchins to a wild-feeding… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Campbell, J. C. (2013). White-faced Capuchins (Cebus capucinus) of Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica: Human Foods and Human Interactions. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/13620

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Campbell, Jennifer Christine. “White-faced Capuchins (Cebus capucinus) of Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica: Human Foods and Human Interactions.” 2013. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed April 16, 2021. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/13620.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Campbell, Jennifer Christine. “White-faced Capuchins (Cebus capucinus) of Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica: Human Foods and Human Interactions.” 2013. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Campbell JC. White-faced Capuchins (Cebus capucinus) of Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica: Human Foods and Human Interactions. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/13620.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Campbell JC. White-faced Capuchins (Cebus capucinus) of Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica: Human Foods and Human Interactions. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2013. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/13620

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.