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You searched for subject:(white evangelicals). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Vermont

1. Nelson, Megan T. The Changing Values of American Evangelicals in Politics.

Degree: Sociology, 2019, University of Vermont

In 2016 81% of self-identified white evangelical Christians voted for Donald Trump in the Presidential election and continued to support him after (Smith & Martinez, 2016; Peters & Dias, 2018). White evangelicals were willing to back a Republican candidate that appeared to deviate from their normal expectations of morality. The relationship between the Republican Party and white evangelical Christians has existed since the election of Ronald Reagan. This project examines the political history of white evangelicals in the United States. It analyzes recent data to compare the differences between white evangelicals and the general population and analyzes reports on white evangelicals during and after the 2016 election. This information is used to establish long-term historical trends that show why white evangelicals showed strong support both during and after the 2016 election within the broader historical context of white evangelicals’ relationship with politics. The results show that white evangelicals support for Trump is due to his alignment with their core political issues. Evangelicals as a political force are reactionary and established themselves in opposition to progressive change in the United States. Their core issues during their emergence have remained mostly consistent, and they have developed new core values in response to the United States’ changing political landscape. Donald Trump’s policies and rhetoric match the white evangelical position on all their primary issues. In combination with this, evangelicals now care less about the personal morality of candidates than any other group which shows a change in how they view candidates. White evangelicals feel as though Donald Trump is on their side and since immoral personal conduct is no longer an issue, his behavior does not pose a significant obstacle to white evangelical support. In summation white evangelicals like other voters, support candidates who will address their issues of concern which is why they supported Donald Trump during the 2016 election and continued to support him afterward. The results of this thesis confirm the findings of the majority of the scholarship on white evangelicals and Trump. Other research consistently concludes that white evangelicals support Trump because he is able to effectively address their fears about the direction that the United States is going and enacts regressive policies which suit their reactionary political agenda. Where the results diverge from previous work is on the matter of how to court evangelicals using religious rhetoric. Previous research has concluded that using religious rhetoric has been a necessary part of wooing the white evangelical voting bloc. This thesis shows that this rhetoric is no longer a requirement to gain white evangelical support. Today white evangelicals are more interested in enacting their values through policies than through a “Godly candidate”. Finally, this thesis goes beyond existing scholarship by placing the events of the 2016 election with… Advisors/Committee Members: Lutz Kaelber.

Subjects/Keywords: white evangelicals; Donald Trump; 2016 election; Republican; politics; America

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nelson, M. T. (2019). The Changing Values of American Evangelicals in Politics. (Thesis). University of Vermont. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses/312

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nelson, Megan T. “The Changing Values of American Evangelicals in Politics.” 2019. Thesis, University of Vermont. Accessed October 22, 2019. https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses/312.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nelson, Megan T. “The Changing Values of American Evangelicals in Politics.” 2019. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Nelson MT. The Changing Values of American Evangelicals in Politics. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses/312.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nelson MT. The Changing Values of American Evangelicals in Politics. [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2019. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses/312

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas A&M University

2. Bracey II, Glenn Edward. The White Evangelical Church: White Evangelicalism as a Racial Social Movement.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2016, Texas A&M University

White evangelical Christianity is widely recognized as a powerful force in US culture and politics. Most observers consider white evangelicalism to be a religious phenomenon that successfully mobilized to dominate Republican and national politics in the mid-twentieth century. I argue that such a characterization is incomplete and misleading. White evangelicalism, or the white evangelical church (WEC), is better understood as a white supremacist social movement that organizes itself through religious institutions and uses Christian discourse to promote white interests. To be sure, many WEC members participate because they truly believe in the religious purpose and benefits of evangelical Christianity. However, the WEC’s demographics, doctrines, and political mobilizations are consistent with a social movement centered on whiteness more than conservative politics or Christianity. My reading of race critical theories (e.g. systemic racism theory), social movement theories (e.g. political process theory), and theories of religion (e.g. civil religion) suggests that white evangelicalism is an ideal social institution for sustaining a white supremacist social movement. Unfortunately, most scholars have not explored this possibility. Using an enhanced version of extended case method, I expose tacit white supremacy at the heart of the WEC movement by examining its internal norms and social impact. My ethnographic research in evangelical churches in the South and Midwest reveals a pattern in which white evangelicals use what I call “race tests” to limit people of color’s access and participation in evangelical churches. I also argue that WEC growth strategies, popular literature, and collective behaviors evince a preoccupation with reaching white individuals who are failing to embody 18th century white virtue. Finally, I examine sermons and Bible studies to show how whiteness shapes the theological substance of the WEC and how white evangelicals place the Bible and God Himself in the service of whiteness. I conclude that the WEC operates as a white supremacist social movement by excluding people of color, mobilizing whites, and elevating whiteness to a sacred status. Advisors/Committee Members: Feagin, Joe R (advisor), Moore, Wendy L (committee member), Saenz, Rogelio (committee member), McIntosh, William A (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: evangelicalism; white evangelicals; white institutional space; political sociology; white racial frame; white evangelical church; social movements; sociology of religion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bracey II, G. E. (2016). The White Evangelical Church: White Evangelicalism as a Racial Social Movement. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157813

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bracey II, Glenn Edward. “The White Evangelical Church: White Evangelicalism as a Racial Social Movement.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157813.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bracey II, Glenn Edward. “The White Evangelical Church: White Evangelicalism as a Racial Social Movement.” 2016. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bracey II GE. The White Evangelical Church: White Evangelicalism as a Racial Social Movement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157813.

Council of Science Editors:

Bracey II GE. The White Evangelical Church: White Evangelicalism as a Racial Social Movement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157813

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