Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

You searched for subject:(wheeze phenotypes). One record found.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Melbourne

1. LODGE, CAROLINE. A longitudinal study of atopy, asthma and lung function from birth to 18 years in a high risk birth cohort.

Degree: 2012, University of Melbourne

Background: The global burden of allergic disease, including asthma, eczema and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is still increasing. Of these, asthma is the most important in terms of morbidity, mortality and financial cost. Asthma is a global problem, estimated to affect 300 million people worldwide. Childhood asthma is the most common chronic disease of children in many westernized countries including Australia. We currently have no effective strategies to prevent development or persistence of asthma. A range of strategies have been trialled, including avoiding environmental triggers (dust mites, animal dander), modification of mothers’ and infants’ diets and randomized controlled trials of anti-inflammatory medications in children at high risk. To date, the results have been disappointing with very modest, if any, impact found. The lack of preventive strategies appears to be related to a poor understanding of asthma aetiology. There are many areas of controversy regarding the early life risk factors for the development of childhood asthma. Asthma is believed to result from a complex interaction between genetic, environmental and biological factors. Of these, the only consistent major risk factors to emerge to date are a family history of atopy or asthma, an individual history of atopy, early childhood eczema, environmental tobacco smoke and viral infections in early childhood. Asthma is known to be a heterogeneous disease in childhood, so that poor classification of asthma groups, or phenotypes, may be part of the reason for the lack of results within and inconsistent findings between studies. There is a critical need for studies which can provide a solid basis for accurate classification of asthma phenotypes as well as investigating plausible risk factors for the development and persistence of asthma. To address questions concerning the classification of asthma phenotypes and the natural history of asthma and allergic disease, along with genetic and environmental factors which may influence aetiology and progression, it is important to use the evidence provided by longitudinal studies. In longitudinal studies, especially birth cohorts with frequent ascertainment of potential aetiological exposures and allergic disease outcomes, it is possible to determine the temporal relationship between exposures and outcomes. This thesis addressed some of the issues in asthma and allergic disease research using data from a longitudinal birth cohort study. The Melbourne Atopy Cohort Study comprises 620 children who were selected before birth for familial allergic disease. These children were very closely followed in the first 2 years of life with 18 telephone interviews. They had yearly follow-ups between ages 3 and 7 and again at ages 12 and 18. Additionally they had clinic testing including cord blood, skin prick testing, and…

Subjects/Keywords: asthma; lung function; birth cohort; wheeze phenotypes

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

LODGE, C. (2012). A longitudinal study of atopy, asthma and lung function from birth to 18 years in a high risk birth cohort. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38274

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

LODGE, CAROLINE. “A longitudinal study of atopy, asthma and lung function from birth to 18 years in a high risk birth cohort.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38274.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

LODGE, CAROLINE. “A longitudinal study of atopy, asthma and lung function from birth to 18 years in a high risk birth cohort.” 2012. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

LODGE C. A longitudinal study of atopy, asthma and lung function from birth to 18 years in a high risk birth cohort. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38274.

Council of Science Editors:

LODGE C. A longitudinal study of atopy, asthma and lung function from birth to 18 years in a high risk birth cohort. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38274

.