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You searched for subject:(water chestnut). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Jiang, Chenliuli. Land Use and Land Cover Based Habitat Analyses of Invasive Species Along the Lower Tonawanda Creek Applying Unmanned Helicopter Remote Sensing.

Degree: 2016, Buffalo State College

Trapa natans (water chestnut) is an exotic annual aquatic plant, which is native to Eurasian and African continents. It is an invasive species in North America and has already caused serious environmental problems because of its strong capability of adaption and propagation. The objectives of this research were to survey and map water chestnut in the lower Tonawanda Creek (Erie Canal) applying unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), evaluate the current management of controlling and removing water chestnut, and analyze how land use and land cover (LULC), as well as habitat conditions, influence the growth of water chestnut. The UAV was not only applied to detect water chestnut plants, but also used to monitor the three-dimensional habitat conditions along the lower Tonawanda Creek. The land use and land cover (LULC) classification of the study area was accomplished in ERDAS Imagine, the spatial interpolation of temperature and relative humidity was conducted in ArcGIS software environment, and the vertical changes of temperature and humidity along different cross-sections were plotted in R software environment. The results show that LULC have effect on the growth of water chestnut and environmental conditions (temperature and relative humidity). However, no strong evidence shows relationship between the growth of water chestnut and habitat conditions of temperature and humidity.

Subjects/Keywords: Water chestnut; UAV; temperature; relative humidity; LULC; Environmental Indicators and Impact Assessment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jiang, C. (2016). Land Use and Land Cover Based Habitat Analyses of Invasive Species Along the Lower Tonawanda Creek Applying Unmanned Helicopter Remote Sensing. (Thesis). Buffalo State College. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/greatlakes_theses/2

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jiang, Chenliuli. “Land Use and Land Cover Based Habitat Analyses of Invasive Species Along the Lower Tonawanda Creek Applying Unmanned Helicopter Remote Sensing.” 2016. Thesis, Buffalo State College. Accessed November 13, 2019. http://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/greatlakes_theses/2.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jiang, Chenliuli. “Land Use and Land Cover Based Habitat Analyses of Invasive Species Along the Lower Tonawanda Creek Applying Unmanned Helicopter Remote Sensing.” 2016. Web. 13 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Jiang C. Land Use and Land Cover Based Habitat Analyses of Invasive Species Along the Lower Tonawanda Creek Applying Unmanned Helicopter Remote Sensing. [Internet] [Thesis]. Buffalo State College; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 13]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/greatlakes_theses/2.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jiang C. Land Use and Land Cover Based Habitat Analyses of Invasive Species Along the Lower Tonawanda Creek Applying Unmanned Helicopter Remote Sensing. [Thesis]. Buffalo State College; 2016. Available from: http://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/greatlakes_theses/2

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


SUNY College at Brockport

2. Des Jardin, Kathryn. Water Chestnut: Field Observations, Competition, and Seed Germination and Viability in Lake Ontario Coastal Wetlands.

Degree: MS, Environmental Science and Biology, 2015, SUNY College at Brockport

Water chestnut (Trapa natans L.) has recently invaded an increasing number of sites in New York State, particularly Lake Ontario coastal wetlands. It can severely inhibit ecosystem functioning and can be costly to control. To understand this exotic invasive plant more thoroughly, field observations and experiments were performed. The field observations were made in Lake Ontario coastal wetlands during the 2014 growing season. Percent coverage, time of flowering, time of seed production, and co-occurring species were noted. A competition experiment was performed using water chestnut and white water lily (Nymphaea odorata Aiton). They were planted together and in monocultures of differing densities. A greenhouse germination experiment in aquaria was conducted on water chestnut seeds using light and temperature as treatments, and seed-viability was examined to assess development stage and cold-stratification requirements. Water lily was the better competitor of the two, but water chestnut had very high germination success. Water chestnut germination does not seem to be inhibited by temperature or by exposure to shade. The seeds do, however, need to be mature and cold-stratified (subjected to a period of cold temperatures for dormancy) to germinate. Water chestnut’s tolerance to temperature, shade, and water depth has serious implications for Great Lakes wetlands if not controlled. There are a few control methods that could prove to be useful, but more research is needed before they are used in field settings. Early detection and manually pulling small patches of plants is a viable option at present. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Douglas A. Wilcox.

Subjects/Keywords: Lake Ontario; Braddock Bay; water chestnut; invasive species; aquatic botany; competition; Environmental Sciences; Natural Resources and Conservation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Des Jardin, K. (2015). Water Chestnut: Field Observations, Competition, and Seed Germination and Viability in Lake Ontario Coastal Wetlands. (Thesis). SUNY College at Brockport. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/env_theses/98

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Des Jardin, Kathryn. “Water Chestnut: Field Observations, Competition, and Seed Germination and Viability in Lake Ontario Coastal Wetlands.” 2015. Thesis, SUNY College at Brockport. Accessed November 13, 2019. https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/env_theses/98.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Des Jardin, Kathryn. “Water Chestnut: Field Observations, Competition, and Seed Germination and Viability in Lake Ontario Coastal Wetlands.” 2015. Web. 13 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Des Jardin K. Water Chestnut: Field Observations, Competition, and Seed Germination and Viability in Lake Ontario Coastal Wetlands. [Internet] [Thesis]. SUNY College at Brockport; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 13]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/env_theses/98.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Des Jardin K. Water Chestnut: Field Observations, Competition, and Seed Germination and Viability in Lake Ontario Coastal Wetlands. [Thesis]. SUNY College at Brockport; 2015. Available from: https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/env_theses/98

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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