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You searched for subject:(water allocation trading). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Haensch, Juliane. Examining the importance of spatial influences on irrigators’ water trading behaviour in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin.

Degree: 2017, University of Adelaide

Water trading is increasingly becoming an important farm management tool for irrigators to manage changing environmental conditions. Studies have found that water trading increases farmers’ flexibility in water use and moves water from lower value (or less efficient) uses to higher value (or more efficient) uses. Many countries that regularly suffer periods of droughts and have over-allocated water resources face a growing challenge to allocate water to competing water uses. Some of these countries have introduced water markets as a response to help enable an efficient allocation of a scarce resource. This is especially so in Australia’s Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), which has had water markets in place for decades. The southern MDB is one of the most active water trading region worldwide, and hence, provides an ideal case study for examining water trading behaviour. The MDB faced the Millennium Drought in the 2000s which caused intensive distress for all alike: irrigators, tourists, rural communities and especially the environment. During the midst of this drought the Federal government introduced a water buyback program that purchased water entitlements from willing irrigators to return to environmental use. To date, a number of studies have investigated irrigators’ determinants to trade water. This literature has primarily focused on farmers’ socio-economic and farm specific characteristics. But there is evidence that water trading is also affected by spatial factors, especially water entitlement trading. Thus, this thesis explores the relevance of spatial influences on irrigators’ water trade decision-making. Traditional economic models of water trading behaviour are expanded with several spatially explicit variables, such as biophysical and distance factors. The influence of neighbours’ water trading decision-making (‘neighbourhood effect’) is also tested, as anecdotal evidence shows that in the past irrigators experienced considerable social pressure if they sold or were willing to sell water entitlements. Furthermore, this thesis also examines the influence of spatial factors on irrigators’ price choices for selling and buying water entitlements. The results show that a number of spatial influences significantly affect water trading behaviour, especially water entitlement selling behaviour. Irrigators located in poorer resource areas (e.g. regarding soil degradation), in more rural areas and regions that suffer a socioeconomic decline (e.g. population decline) are more likely to sell water entitlements. There is evidence of a substitution effect between surface-water and groundwater (where viable groundwater resources exist). Irrigators in more rural areas tend to sell larger volumes of water entitlements and buy larger volumes of water allocations. Furthermore, a positive neighbourhood effect is confirmed, where irrigators’ decisions to sell water entitlements was influenced by their neighbours. Over time, it became more socially acceptable to sell water entitlements. Finally, spatial influences also affect… Advisors/Committee Members: Wheeler, Sarah (advisor), Zuo, Alec (advisor), Bjornlund, Henning (advisor), Centre for Global Food and Resources (school).

Subjects/Keywords: water entitlement trading; water allocation trading; Australia; farmers; location; spatial effects; Research by Publication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haensch, J. (2017). Examining the importance of spatial influences on irrigators’ water trading behaviour in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107398

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haensch, Juliane. “Examining the importance of spatial influences on irrigators’ water trading behaviour in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin.” 2017. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107398.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haensch, Juliane. “Examining the importance of spatial influences on irrigators’ water trading behaviour in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin.” 2017. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Haensch J. Examining the importance of spatial influences on irrigators’ water trading behaviour in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107398.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haensch J. Examining the importance of spatial influences on irrigators’ water trading behaviour in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107398

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Hall, Mathew Peter. Irrigators’ Perception and Intention towards Water Re-allocation Policies in Southern Alberta .

Degree: 2014, University of Lethbridge

A necessary precursor to irrigated agriculture in southern Alberta is the availability of massive quantities of water. Many suggest that water demand will rise substantially in the decades to come. These projections also come at a time of increasing environmental awareness in Alberta, leading some to advocate that more water should be secured for environmental purposes. The Alberta government enabled inter-sectoral water transfers as a way to re-allocate water in order to satisfy growing demand. This has raised skepticism among the irrigation community over the use of water transfers as a way to satisfy future demand. The research presented in this thesis approaches this issue by examining the factors that influence irrigators’ perceptions towards using water transfers as a way to re-allocate water to other uses. The findings reveal that if the government is relying on water transfers as the primary way to re-allocate water in the future, it must address irrigators’ skepticism, and create conditions that promote transfers as a preferable option.

Subjects/Keywords: water management; water trading; irrigation; water re-allocation; water conservation; water resources management

…towards transferring, or trading, water as a means for permanent re-allocation (Nicol… …PERCENTAGE OF WATER ALLOCATION USED DURING AVERAGE YEAR… …the SSRB’s water allocation is tied up with irrigation uses, it is expected that this will… …irrigation accounts for roughly 77% of the SSRB’s water allocation, it is expected that this water… …will be a major source of water to meet future demand through market re-allocation. The Water… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hall, M. P. (2014). Irrigators’ Perception and Intention towards Water Re-allocation Policies in Southern Alberta . (Thesis). University of Lethbridge. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10133/3515

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hall, Mathew Peter. “Irrigators’ Perception and Intention towards Water Re-allocation Policies in Southern Alberta .” 2014. Thesis, University of Lethbridge. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10133/3515.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hall, Mathew Peter. “Irrigators’ Perception and Intention towards Water Re-allocation Policies in Southern Alberta .” 2014. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hall MP. Irrigators’ Perception and Intention towards Water Re-allocation Policies in Southern Alberta . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Lethbridge; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10133/3515.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hall MP. Irrigators’ Perception and Intention towards Water Re-allocation Policies in Southern Alberta . [Thesis]. University of Lethbridge; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10133/3515

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North-West University

3. Van der Walt, Maria Magdalena. The concept "beneficial use" in South African water law reform / by Maria Magdalena van der Walt .

Degree: 2011, North-West University

The concept "beneficial use" plays a pivotal role in South African water law reform. It forms the foundation of the mechanism to make water use rights available for the reform of the allocation of water use entitlements. The mechanism involves that water use rights that were unexercised in the two years before the promulgation of the National Water Act 36 of 1998 are not defined as existing lawful water uses. Where the concept "beneficial use" is utilised to cancel unexercised water use rights, it can cause potential hardship. Some people whose rights have been cancelled believe that they should be able to rely on the property clause in section 25 of the Constitution of 1996 to either have the legislation declared unconstitutional or to demand compensation. Section 25 of the Constitution of 1996 prohibits the arbitrary deprivation of property and states that property may only be expropriated for a public purpose or in the public interest, subject to compensation. Section 25(4) states, however, that the public interest includes the nation's commitment to land reform and to reforms to bring about equitable access to all South Africa's natural resources. It is clear from this that reforms to bring about access to water are allowed by the property clause. One of the main questions discussed in this thesis was whether section 32 of the National Water Act 36 of 1998 that made more water available for distribution for reform purposes by cancelling unexercised water user rights, leads to an arbitrary deprivation or an expropriation of property. It should be noted that section 32 of the National Water Act did not constitute an arbitrary deprivation of property, as sufficient reason exists for water law reform. A possible constitutional challenge based on the lack of due process of law because of the retrospective operation of the section may possibly be averted because of the existence of section 33 of the National Water Act. Section 33 of the Act mitigates hardship by allowing unexercised water uses to be declared existing lawful water uses in certain circumstances where a good reason for the non–exercise of the water use right existed. Even in cases where section 33 does not prevent section 32 from being regarded as an arbitrary deprivation of property because there still was not a proper procedure, the government will probably be able to show that the limitation in section 32 is, in terms of section 36(1) of the Constitution of 1996, reasonable and justifiable in an open and democratic society. Despite the fact that section 25(1) prohibits arbitrary deprivations, it does not prohibit the government from regulating competing rights to use water even though some people may be negatively affected by the regulation. Because the Minister merely acts as public trustee of the nation's water resources on behalf of the national government in terms section 3(1) of the National Water Act, it cannot be claimed that the government acquired the cancelled water use rights. A claim that compensation should be paid for an expropriation of…

Subjects/Keywords: Beneficial use; Public trusteeship; Custodianship; Water law reform; Right of access to sufficient water; Water allocation; National Water Act 36 of 1998; Equality; Section 9 Constitution of 1996; Section 25 Constitution of 1996; Section 27(1) Constitution of 1996; Section 195 Constitution of 1996; Res omnium communes; Water use rights; Water use entitlement; Water allocation or entitlement trading; Statutory property; Deprivation; Expropriation; Constructive expropriation; Acquisition; American public trust doctrine; Australian National Water Initiative; Voordelige gebruik; Openbare trusteeskap; Rentmeesterskap; Waterreghervorming; Reg van toegang tot voldoende water; Watertoekennings; Gelykheid; Nasionale Waterwet 36 van 1998; Artikel 9 Grondwet van 1996; Artikel 25 Grondwet van 1996; Artikel 27(1) Grondwet van 1996; Artikel 195 Grondwet van 1996; Watergebruiksregte; Watergebruiksaanspraak; Handel in watergebruiksaansprake of -toekennings; Statutêre eiendom; Ontneming; Onteiening; Konstruktiewe onteiening; Verkryging; Amerikaanse leestuk van die public trust; Australiese National Water Initiative

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van der Walt, M. M. (2011). The concept "beneficial use" in South African water law reform / by Maria Magdalena van der Walt . (Thesis). North-West University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10394/5537

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van der Walt, Maria Magdalena. “The concept "beneficial use" in South African water law reform / by Maria Magdalena van der Walt .” 2011. Thesis, North-West University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10394/5537.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van der Walt, Maria Magdalena. “The concept "beneficial use" in South African water law reform / by Maria Magdalena van der Walt .” 2011. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Van der Walt MM. The concept "beneficial use" in South African water law reform / by Maria Magdalena van der Walt . [Internet] [Thesis]. North-West University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10394/5537.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Van der Walt MM. The concept "beneficial use" in South African water law reform / by Maria Magdalena van der Walt . [Thesis]. North-West University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10394/5537

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.