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You searched for subject:(voluntary environmental schemes). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Lincoln University

1. Coghlan, Shannon. An evaluation of voluntary environmental schemes used by the dairy industry in Canterbury, New Zealand.

Degree: 2015, Lincoln University

Internationally, there are increasing concerns regarding the environmental impacts associated with intensive dairy farming. However, few studies have determined the characteristics of these approaches in the agricultural industry, or their effectiveness. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to determine what the desired attributes are or design features which are required to form an effective scheme. From this, the study examines voluntary dairy schemes adopted by the Canterbury dairy industry in New Zealand against the desired attributes of environmental schemes found in the literature. Eight environmental dairy schemes were reviewed against six key design categories of an effective scheme that were identified. The study strived to assess the consistency of voluntary schemes design through focusing on scheme’s inclusion of particular attributes in their design. This was achieved by using content analysis, utilising NVivo 10 software and evaluating the schemes in terms of their 1) environmental focus, 2) goals and objectives, 3) measurement mechanisms 4) incentives and benefits provided and 5) involvement and communication with other parties. The main findings of the study were that there was a significant focus on nutrient management issues, lack of incentives and benefits provided and the wide use of third parties for monitoring. This study has the propensity to inform the policy makers on design of an effective voluntary scheme for the dairy industry. The results of this study identified ways in which New Zealand dairy farming voluntary schemes can be improved toward increased sustainability within the New Zealand dairy industry. Advisors/Committee Members: Balzarova, Michaela, McWilliam, Wendy.

Subjects/Keywords: voluntary environmental schemes; Canterbury; environmental issues; dairy industry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coghlan, S. (2015). An evaluation of voluntary environmental schemes used by the dairy industry in Canterbury, New Zealand. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6685

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coghlan, Shannon. “An evaluation of voluntary environmental schemes used by the dairy industry in Canterbury, New Zealand.” 2015. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6685.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coghlan, Shannon. “An evaluation of voluntary environmental schemes used by the dairy industry in Canterbury, New Zealand.” 2015. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Coghlan S. An evaluation of voluntary environmental schemes used by the dairy industry in Canterbury, New Zealand. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6685.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Coghlan S. An evaluation of voluntary environmental schemes used by the dairy industry in Canterbury, New Zealand. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6685

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

2. Mark, Abigail. Dairy farmers’ perspectives of riparian corridor design and management: a Canterbury, New Zealand, case study.

Degree: 2016, Lincoln University

Riparian corridors provide many functions in agricultural landscapes which contribute to water quality and ecological values. However intensification of dairy farms has degraded waterways and their functions within many regions of New Zealand. Waterways have been left unfenced and accessible to stock, which has led to increased sedimentation and contamination of surface water, and the loss of other riparian functions that rely on vegetation and clean water such as biodiversity, fishing, swimming, food gathering, and recreational activities. Increasing attention upon these issues both in the media and in public policy, and the perceived need to protect the reputation of the New Zealand dairy industry, has led dairy companies, regional councils and non-governmental organizations to develop voluntary agri-environmental programmes that encourage farmer suppliers of dairy companies to exclude stock from riparian corridors (including from main crossing points) and to progressively plant some of their riparian corridors. There have been surveys of progress towards targets set by these programmes, but little is known about farmers’ first hand experiences of the design and management of their riparian corridors. Through key informant interviews with farmers in a Canterbury case study, this research describes how dairy farmers are designing and managing their riparian corridors, and evaluates their effectiveness for meeting dairy farmer, regulatory and industry expectations. Advisors/Committee Members: McWilliam, Wendy, Swaffield, Simon.

Subjects/Keywords: riparian corridor impacts; riparian corridor protection and restoration; intensive farming; riparian management; voluntary environmental approaches; voluntary pollution prevention programmes; agri-environment schemes; surveys

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mark, A. (2016). Dairy farmers’ perspectives of riparian corridor design and management: a Canterbury, New Zealand, case study. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7733

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mark, Abigail. “Dairy farmers’ perspectives of riparian corridor design and management: a Canterbury, New Zealand, case study.” 2016. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7733.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mark, Abigail. “Dairy farmers’ perspectives of riparian corridor design and management: a Canterbury, New Zealand, case study.” 2016. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mark A. Dairy farmers’ perspectives of riparian corridor design and management: a Canterbury, New Zealand, case study. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7733.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mark A. Dairy farmers’ perspectives of riparian corridor design and management: a Canterbury, New Zealand, case study. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7733

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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