Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(visuotactile). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Pennsylvania

1. Zhang, Mabel. Tactile Perception And Visuotactile Integration For Robotic Exploration.

Degree: 2019, University of Pennsylvania

As the close perceptual sibling of vision, the sense of touch has historically received less than deserved attention in both human psychology and robotics. In robotics, this may be attributed to at least two reasons. First, it suffers from the vicious cycle of immature sensor technology, which causes industry demand to be low, and then there is even less incentive to make existing sensors in research labs easy to manufacture and marketable. Second, the situation stems from a fear of making contact with the environment, avoided in every way so that visually perceived states do not change before a carefully estimated and ballistically executed physical interaction. Fortunately, the latter viewpoint is starting to change. Work in interactive perception and contact-rich manipulation are on the rise. Good reasons are steering the manipulation and locomotion communities’ attention towards deliberate physical interaction with the environment prior to, during, and after a task. We approach the problem of perception prior to manipulation, using the sense of touch, for the purpose of understanding the surroundings of an autonomous robot. The overwhelming majority of work in perception for manipulation is based on vision. While vision is a fast and global modality, it is insufficient as the sole modality, especially in environments where the ambient light or the objects therein do not lend themselves to vision, such as in darkness, smoky or dusty rooms in search and rescue, underwater, transparent and reflective objects, and retrieving items inside a bag. Even in normal lighting conditions, during a manipulation task, the target object and fingers are usually occluded from view by the gripper. Moreover, vision-based grasp planners, typically trained in simulation, often make errors that cannot be foreseen until contact. As a step towards addressing these problems, we present first a global shape-based feature descriptor for object recognition using non-prehensile tactile probing alone. Then, we investigate in making the tactile modality, local and slow by nature, more efficient for the task by predicting the most cost-effective moves using active exploration. To combine the local and physical advantages of touch and the fast and global advantages of vision, we propose and evaluate a learning-based method for visuotactile integration for grasping.

Subjects/Keywords: active exploration; grasping; manipulation; object recognition; tactile perception; visuotactile integration; Computer Sciences; Robotics

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, M. (2019). Tactile Perception And Visuotactile Integration For Robotic Exploration. (Thesis). University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved from https://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations/3324

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Mabel. “Tactile Perception And Visuotactile Integration For Robotic Exploration.” 2019. Thesis, University of Pennsylvania. Accessed October 28, 2020. https://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations/3324.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Mabel. “Tactile Perception And Visuotactile Integration For Robotic Exploration.” 2019. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhang M. Tactile Perception And Visuotactile Integration For Robotic Exploration. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Pennsylvania; 2019. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: https://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations/3324.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang M. Tactile Perception And Visuotactile Integration For Robotic Exploration. [Thesis]. University of Pennsylvania; 2019. Available from: https://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations/3324

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Finkelshtein, Anna. ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS.

Degree: PhD, 2015, McMaster University

Voluntary actions affect subsequent perception. For example, an action that precedes an auditory stimulus is perceived to have occurred later in time than is actually the case, while the auditory stimulus is perceived earlier in time. This effect is known as intentional binding. Current literature regarding action effects focuses on perception of a single sensory modality while the effects on perception of multiple modalities remain largely unknown. The present thesis explored how actions influenced the timing of perceived multisensory events. Additionally, this thesis investigated differences in voluntary compared to involuntary actions on subsequent perception. In Chapter 2, action effects on perceived onsets of visual and tactile stimuli were explored. This question was extended to other bimodal pairs, including audiovisual and audiotactile, in Chapter 3. Lastly, in Chapter 4, action effects on temporal resolution were investigated. In all the experiments, participants performed a chosen or a fixed button press that followed a bimodal temporal order judgment (TOJ) task. To investigate the influence of spatial proximity between actions and stimuli on binding, in Chapters 2 and 3, each stimulus modality appeared on different sides. In Chapter 4, the critical stimuli appeared at the same location, either close to or far from the preceding action, to explore the effect of action on temporal resolution. The present data provide evidence that actions affect the perceived onsets of multisensory events in an idiosyncratic manner, depending on the subsequent stimuli. Actions appear to preferentially bind to vision, then touch, and lastly, audition, but actions do not always bind to subsequent stimuli. Furthermore, actions degrade temporal resolution of bimodal stimuli. Lastly, the type of action, whether chosen or fixed, did not impact the degree of binding. Together, these data contribute to the action-perception literature, illustrating that our behaviours dynamically affect how we perceive the world.

Dissertation

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Shore, David I., Psychology.

Subjects/Keywords: multisensory; temporal order judgment task; point of subjective simultaneity; just noticeable difference; visuotactile; audiovisual; audiotactile; perceived onset; temporal precision; cognition and perception; cognitive psychology; action

…113 3.6.2 Action Effects on Visuotactile Pairs… …128 4.3 Experiment 1: Action Effects on Visuotactile Temporal Resolution… …2005). Audiovisual and visuotactile stimuli presented close together in external space… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Finkelshtein, A. (2015). ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17748

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Finkelshtein, Anna. “ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17748.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Finkelshtein, Anna. “ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS.” 2015. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Finkelshtein A. ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17748.

Council of Science Editors:

Finkelshtein A. ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17748

3. Hahler, Eva-Maria. A Psychophysical Assessment of Multisensory Processing and Multiple Object Tracking in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Degree: 2014, Université de Montréal

Subjects/Keywords: Troubles du spectre autistique; Traitement visuo-tactile; Traitement multisensoriel; Développement; Autism Spectrum Disorders; Multisensory processing; Visuotactile processing; Development; Attention; 3D-MOT; Psychology - Developmental / Psychologie du développement (UMI : 0620)

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hahler, E. (2014). A Psychophysical Assessment of Multisensory Processing and Multiple Object Tracking in Autism Spectrum Disorders. (Thesis). Université de Montréal. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1866/10327

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hahler, Eva-Maria. “A Psychophysical Assessment of Multisensory Processing and Multiple Object Tracking in Autism Spectrum Disorders.” 2014. Thesis, Université de Montréal. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1866/10327.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hahler, Eva-Maria. “A Psychophysical Assessment of Multisensory Processing and Multiple Object Tracking in Autism Spectrum Disorders.” 2014. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Hahler E. A Psychophysical Assessment of Multisensory Processing and Multiple Object Tracking in Autism Spectrum Disorders. [Internet] [Thesis]. Université de Montréal; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1866/10327.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hahler E. A Psychophysical Assessment of Multisensory Processing and Multiple Object Tracking in Autism Spectrum Disorders. [Thesis]. Université de Montréal; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1866/10327

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.