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You searched for subject:(visual schedules). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Wong, Lillian. Training Parent Implementation of a Visual Activity Schedule Treatment Package.

Degree: Applied Behavior Analysis: M.S., Community Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy, 2016, St. Cloud State University

Much of the extant research on visual activity schedules (VAS) involves professional behavior change agents, such as experimenters, therapists, and teachers, with little information about parent implementation in the home environment. The behavioral skills training (BST) literature also lacks studies on training implementation of activity schedules. A BST procedure consisting of instructions, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback was used to teach parents of three children with autism to implement a VAS intervention at home. Experimental control was demonstrated using a multiple baseline design across parent-child dyads. Results showed that the BST procedure was effective in training parents to conduct a 50-component task analysis with high fidelity. Child on-task and on-schedule behaviors also improved significantly as a result of the intervention. Social validity was assessed via a 10-item questionnaire after completion of follow-up. Strengths and limitations are discussed, as well as implications for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Kimberly Schulze, Eric Rudrud, Benjamin Witts.

Subjects/Keywords: parents; caregivers; autism; visual activity schedules; behavioral skills training

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APA (6th Edition):

Wong, L. (2016). Training Parent Implementation of a Visual Activity Schedule Treatment Package. (Masters Thesis). St. Cloud State University. Retrieved from https://repository.stcloudstate.edu/cpcf_etds/19

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wong, Lillian. “Training Parent Implementation of a Visual Activity Schedule Treatment Package.” 2016. Masters Thesis, St. Cloud State University. Accessed November 12, 2019. https://repository.stcloudstate.edu/cpcf_etds/19.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wong, Lillian. “Training Parent Implementation of a Visual Activity Schedule Treatment Package.” 2016. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Wong L. Training Parent Implementation of a Visual Activity Schedule Treatment Package. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. St. Cloud State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: https://repository.stcloudstate.edu/cpcf_etds/19.

Council of Science Editors:

Wong L. Training Parent Implementation of a Visual Activity Schedule Treatment Package. [Masters Thesis]. St. Cloud State University; 2016. Available from: https://repository.stcloudstate.edu/cpcf_etds/19


Chapman University

2. Young, Anthony. Assisting Children Action Association Through Visual Queues and Wearable Technology.

Degree: MS, Computational and Data Sciences, 2016, Chapman University

Autism Spectrum Disorder makes it difficult to for a child communicate, have social interactions and go through daily life. Visual cues are often used to help a child associate an image with an event. With technology becoming more and more advanced, we now have a way to remind a child of an event with wearable technology, such as a watch. This new technology can help a child directly with the Visual Scheduling Application and various other applications. These applications allow children and their families to be easily able to keep track of the events on their schedule and notify them when an event occurs. With the Autism Management Platform and related website, a parent can easily create events to help a child throughout the day. The child can associate an image with events, allowing for a clearer understanding of what to do when an event occurs. Wearable technology has become a new way to interact with the user in a very unobtrusive manner. With this new technology, we can help associate a visual event to a child’s schedule and interrupt when needed to help make the child’s life easier on a daily basis. Advisors/Committee Members: Erik Linstead, Michael Fahy, Peiyi Zaho.

Subjects/Keywords: Autism; Visual; Schedules; Computing; Computational Engineering; Computer and Systems Architecture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Young, A. (2016). Assisting Children Action Association Through Visual Queues and Wearable Technology. (Thesis). Chapman University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.chapman.edu/comp_science_theses/2

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Young, Anthony. “Assisting Children Action Association Through Visual Queues and Wearable Technology.” 2016. Thesis, Chapman University. Accessed November 12, 2019. https://digitalcommons.chapman.edu/comp_science_theses/2.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Young, Anthony. “Assisting Children Action Association Through Visual Queues and Wearable Technology.” 2016. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Young A. Assisting Children Action Association Through Visual Queues and Wearable Technology. [Internet] [Thesis]. Chapman University; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.chapman.edu/comp_science_theses/2.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Young A. Assisting Children Action Association Through Visual Queues and Wearable Technology. [Thesis]. Chapman University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.chapman.edu/comp_science_theses/2

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Central Florida

3. Gourwitz, Jillian. iPads for Students with ASD: Comparing Delivery Modes for Visual Activity Schedules.

Degree: 2014, University of Central Florida

Visual Activity Schedules (VAS) are tools that present an abstract concept, such as time, in a more concrete and manageable form. VAS allow students to anticipate upcoming events and activities, develop an understanding of time, and facilitate the ability to predict change. Prior investigations have used VAS to increase on-task behavior while enhancing the student's ability to independently make transitions from one activity to another and are particularly appropriate as they capitalize on the visual strengths exhibited by many students with autism. Mobile devices such as the iPad are becoming a tool for teaching students with disabilities, and research is currently underway to determine the effectiveness of specific applications on student performance. This research examined the impact of VAS delivered via the iPad, compared to a paper-based VAS, on the percentage of on-task behavior and median transition time for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during academic center activities in an inclusive classroom setting. An alternating-treatment, single-subject research design was used to determine whether a divergence exists between the paper-based VAS and the iPad VAS. This study included three student participants who (a) had a diagnosis of ASD as stated on the Individualized Education Plan (IEP), (b) were in grade level K-1, (c) received instruction through Language Arts activity centers taught within one classroom, and (d) had difficulty with independent on-task behavior as reported by the participant's teacher. Visual analysis of the data for on-task behavior revealed mixed results. Student 1 had a divergence between on-task behavior, with the paper-based VAS being a superior treatment condition to the iPad VAS 80% of the time. Student 2 also had a divergence between percentage of on-task behavior, with the iPad VAS being a superior treatment condition to the paper-based VAS 80% of the time. Student 3 had no clear divergence in percentage of on-task behavior between the iPad VAS and the paper-based VAS. All three participants had highly variable baseline and intervention data for transition time with a level stability range of 20% to 60%. Student 1 and Student 3 had no clear difference in transition time when comparing the paper-based VAS to the iPad VAS. Student 2 had a divergence in transition time data between the iPad VAS and the paper-based VAS, with the paper-based VAS being a superior treatment condition 90% of the time. Advisors/Committee Members: Martin, Suzanne.

Subjects/Keywords: Autism; visual schedules; ipads; Education; Special Education and Teaching; Dissertations, Academic  – Education and Human Performance; Education and Human Performance  – Dissertations, Academic

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gourwitz, J. (2014). iPads for Students with ASD: Comparing Delivery Modes for Visual Activity Schedules. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Central Florida. Retrieved from https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/4554

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gourwitz, Jillian. “iPads for Students with ASD: Comparing Delivery Modes for Visual Activity Schedules.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Central Florida. Accessed November 12, 2019. https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/4554.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gourwitz, Jillian. “iPads for Students with ASD: Comparing Delivery Modes for Visual Activity Schedules.” 2014. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Gourwitz J. iPads for Students with ASD: Comparing Delivery Modes for Visual Activity Schedules. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Central Florida; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/4554.

Council of Science Editors:

Gourwitz J. iPads for Students with ASD: Comparing Delivery Modes for Visual Activity Schedules. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Central Florida; 2014. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/4554

.