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You searched for subject:(van Ginkel). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Columbia University

1. Riar, Inderbir. Expo 67, or the Architecture of Late Modernity.

Degree: 2014, Columbia University

The 1967 Universal and International Exhibition, the Montreal world's fair commonly known as Expo 67, produced both continuations of and crises in the emancipatory project of modern architecture. Like many world's fairs before it, Expo 67 was designed to mediate relations between peoples and things through its architecture. The origins of this work lay in the efforts of Daniel van Ginkel and Blanche Lemco van Ginkel, architects and town planners who, in remarkable reports, drawings, and architectural ideals advanced between 1962 and 1963, outlined the basis of a fundamentally new, though never fully realised, world's fair in the late twentieth century. Party to the Congrès Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne and its influential prewar edicts on functionalist town planning as well as to groups like Team 10 and their opposition to diagrammatic generalisations by an emphasis on the personal, the particular, and the precise, the van Ginkels also drew on contemporary theories and practices of North American urban renewal when first conceiving Expo 67 as an instrument for redeveloping downtown Montreal. The resulting work, Man and the City, which officially secured the world's fair bid but remained unbuilt, carefully drew on the legacies of most great exhibitions, especially those of the nineteenth century, in order to conceive of sufficiently heroic structures making immanent novel forms of human interaction, social control, and the technical organisation of space. In 1967, this was to suggest a new world historical project - in a space existing for only six months but crowded with 50 million visitors - promoting senses of fraternal self-awareness through the unrelenting promise of progress. The resulting well-known Expo 67 theme, Man and His World, was a paean to contemporary humanism first used by the van Ginkels and their architect allies to reject the most enduring symbols of world exhibitions: the nation-state and its emblematic architecture. They imagined new kinds of architecture that could somehow engender new senses of political consciousness (inspired by, for example, UNESCO or the celebrated Family of Man photography exhibition of 1955) outside nationalist chauvinism. This was a vision of late modernity: a transitional form of political subjectivity still clinging to the shared passions of the citizen (thus for the polis) before being subsumed by mass culture - in other words, a moment during which nationalisms could still be channelled into alternative forms of political belonging free of narrow self-interest. The belief marked every aspect of the van Ginkels early plans and had half-lives in two consequential works: the theme pavilions Man the Producer and Habitat 67, which, with outward emphasis on the aesthetics and technics of innovative structures (and mass production), were seen as fulfilling the ambitions of the megastructural movement in the 1960s. As such, theses architectures of late modernity reflected a markedly modernist conviction of long duration: on the one hand, an abiding faith in…

Subjects/Keywords: Urban renewal; Expo (International Exhibitions Bureau); Architecture; History; History, Modern; Van Ginkel, Blanche Lemco

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APA (6th Edition):

Riar, I. (2014). Expo 67, or the Architecture of Late Modernity. (Doctoral Dissertation). Columbia University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.7916/D8NS0S1T

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Riar, Inderbir. “Expo 67, or the Architecture of Late Modernity.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Columbia University. Accessed October 18, 2019. https://doi.org/10.7916/D8NS0S1T.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Riar, Inderbir. “Expo 67, or the Architecture of Late Modernity.” 2014. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Riar I. Expo 67, or the Architecture of Late Modernity. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Columbia University; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.7916/D8NS0S1T.

Council of Science Editors:

Riar I. Expo 67, or the Architecture of Late Modernity. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Columbia University; 2014. Available from: https://doi.org/10.7916/D8NS0S1T


Leiden University

2. van Ginkel, Earvin Mitchell. The Politics of Dutch Bilateral Investment Treaties.

Degree: 2018, Leiden University

This master thesis uncovers the influence of business lobbying on the Dutch Bilateral Investment Treaty (BIT) program from the 1960s until 2016. Drawing on a wide collection of sources, historical archives, extensive literature and press research, public records and interviews, this thesis examines more than 100 BITs to reveal the corporate and governmental drivers of the Dutch BIT program. It finds that the role of business preferences and lobbying in the context of Dutch BITs is generally overstated, although Dutch corporations like Shell, Philips and Unilever were actively involved in the early days. Advisors/Committee Members: London, Jonathan (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Bilateral Investment Treaty; BIT; Dutch investment; Dutch investment policy; Political Economy; Investment Treaty; ISDS; International Investment; van Ginkel

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APA (6th Edition):

van Ginkel, E. M. (2018). The Politics of Dutch Bilateral Investment Treaties. (Masters Thesis). Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/66037

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

van Ginkel, Earvin Mitchell. “The Politics of Dutch Bilateral Investment Treaties.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Leiden University. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/66037.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

van Ginkel, Earvin Mitchell. “The Politics of Dutch Bilateral Investment Treaties.” 2018. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

van Ginkel EM. The Politics of Dutch Bilateral Investment Treaties. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Leiden University; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/66037.

Council of Science Editors:

van Ginkel EM. The Politics of Dutch Bilateral Investment Treaties. [Masters Thesis]. Leiden University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/66037


McGill University

3. Hodges, Margaret Emily. Blanche Lemco van Ginkel and H.P. Daniel van Ginkel : urban planning.

Degree: PhD, Department of Art History and Communication Studies., 2004, McGill University

Blanche Lemco van Ginkel (1923), a pioneering Canadian woman architect and urban planner, contributed to the most important planning projects in Montreal during the 1960s. She worked in collaboration with H. P. Daniel van Ginkel, and together their planning proposals determined the direction of the future growth of Montreal. At a time of rapid clearance and construction in the city core, and when the Old City was at risk of total demolition, the van Ginkels were committed to the development of a humane architectural environment. The van Ginkels understood Modernism as a movement concerned with ethical, social and technical improvements within society, not merely as a style for building and major redevelopment.

In this thesis, I argue that Lemco van Ginkel developed a unique Modern urban aesthetic that is reflected in her planning work in Montreal. She viewed the urban environment as a total fabric in which the disruption of one thread affected the whole. Any changes made must be done with due respect for the totality ensuring an end product that is a whole cloth, not a patchwork. The development of her urban aesthetic can be properly understood only against the following backdrop: her experience in Europe, working in the Atelier of Le Corbusier, and attending CIAM in association with Team Ten; and, in the United States while teaching in the 1950s at the University of Pennsylvania where she initiated an American chapter of CIAM (Group for Architectural Investigation). Moreover, her design theory must be viewed in light of her collaboration with her husband, H. P. Daniel van Ginkel (1920), a member of the Dutch CIAM and a founding member of Team Ten during the 1950s. Lemco van Ginkel's conception of a Modern urban aesthetic allowed her to assume an essential role in the fundamental design of Montreal.

Advisors/Committee Members: Boker, Hans (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Van Ginkel, Blanche Lemco; Van Ginkel, H. P. Daniel; City planning  – Québec (Province)  – Montréal  – History  – 20th century

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hodges, M. E. (2004). Blanche Lemco van Ginkel and H.P. Daniel van Ginkel : urban planning. (Doctoral Dissertation). McGill University. Retrieved from http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile84513.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hodges, Margaret Emily. “Blanche Lemco van Ginkel and H.P. Daniel van Ginkel : urban planning.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, McGill University. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile84513.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hodges, Margaret Emily. “Blanche Lemco van Ginkel and H.P. Daniel van Ginkel : urban planning.” 2004. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hodges ME. Blanche Lemco van Ginkel and H.P. Daniel van Ginkel : urban planning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McGill University; 2004. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile84513.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Hodges ME. Blanche Lemco van Ginkel and H.P. Daniel van Ginkel : urban planning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McGill University; 2004. Available from: http://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/thesisfile84513.pdf

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