Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(unified fracture design). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Houston

1. Ravikumar, Arjun. Physical Optimization of Acid Fracturing with Unified Fracture Design.

Degree: MS, Petroleum Engineering, 2014, University of Houston

Acid fracturing is a reservoir stimulation technique where a fracture is created by injection of acid into the reservoir instead of conventional proppant slurry. The acid causes differential etching on the fracture walls, creating asperities. These asperities hold up the fracture wall, thus contributing to fracture conductivity. Acid fracturing is used mainly to stimulate carbonate rock. This technique has certain advantages over conventional fracturing. There is no proppant used, therefore the risk of screenout is nullified. There are also logistic reasons such as transport of proppant, which might make acid fracturing a viable choice. Theoretically, acid fractures have infinite conductivity in these conduits. This is not always true in practice. In this work, a physical optimization of acid fracturing is performed by utilizing the Unified Fracture Design methodology (UFD, hereforth). Parametric studies are performed to study the dependency of productivity on various factors. Advisors/Committee Members: Lee, William M. (advisor), Willam, Kaspar J. (committee member), Myers, Michael T. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Unified fracture design; Acid fracturing; Optimization

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ravikumar, A. (2014). Physical Optimization of Acid Fracturing with Unified Fracture Design. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1665

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ravikumar, Arjun. “Physical Optimization of Acid Fracturing with Unified Fracture Design.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1665.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ravikumar, Arjun. “Physical Optimization of Acid Fracturing with Unified Fracture Design.” 2014. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Ravikumar A. Physical Optimization of Acid Fracturing with Unified Fracture Design. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1665.

Council of Science Editors:

Ravikumar A. Physical Optimization of Acid Fracturing with Unified Fracture Design. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1665


Texas A&M University

2. Pitakbunkate, Termpan. Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design.

Degree: MS, Petroleum Engineering, 2010, Texas A&M University

Hydraulic fracturing plays an important role in increasing production rate in tight reservoirs. The performance of the reservoir after fracturing can be observed from the productivity index. This parameter is dependent on the fracture geometry; height, length and width. Unified fracture design (UFD) offers a method to determine the fracture dimensions providing the maximum productivity index for a specific proppant amount. Then, in order to achieve the maximum productivity index, the treatment schedules including the amount of liquid and proppant used for each stage must be determined according to the fracture dimensions obtained from the UFD. The proppant number is necessary for determining the fracture geometry using the UFD. This number is used to find the maximum productivity index for a given proppant amount. Then, the dimensionless fracture conductivity index corresponding to the maximum productivity index can be computed. The penetration ration, the fracture length, and the propped fracture width can be computed from the dimensionless fracture conductivity. However, calculating the proppant number used in UFD requires the fracture height as an input. The most convenient way to estimate fracture height to input to the UFD is to assume that the fracture height is restricted by stress contrast between the pay zone and over and under-lying layers. In other words, the fracture height is assumed to be constant, independent of net pressure and equal to the thickness of the layer which has the least minimum principal stress. However, in reality, the fracture may grow out from the target formation and the height of fracture is dependent on the net pressure during the treatment. Therefore, it is necessary to couple determination of the fracture height with determination of the other fracture parameters. In this research, equilibrium height theory is applied to rigorously determine the height of fracture. Solving the problem iteratively, it is possible to incorporate the rigorous fracture height determination into the unified fracture design. Advisors/Committee Members: Valko, Peter P. (advisor), Ehlig-Economics, Christine (committee member), Taliaferro, Steven (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: hydraulic fracturing; fracture height determination; equilibrium height; unified fracture design; incorporating rigorous height determination into unified fracture design

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pitakbunkate, T. (2010). Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-08-8233

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pitakbunkate, Termpan. “Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-08-8233.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pitakbunkate, Termpan. “Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design.” 2010. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Pitakbunkate T. Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2010. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-08-8233.

Council of Science Editors:

Pitakbunkate T. Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-08-8233


University of Houston

3. Bhattacharya, Srimoyee 1986-. Computer-Aided Methodology for the Analysis, Design and Optimization of Production from Unconventional Gas Reservoirs.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2012, University of Houston

During the past decade, the production of unconventional natural gas, particularly gas from shale rocks, grew to reach more than 50 percent of the annual U.S. natural gas output. The term unconventional refers to gas contained in rock formations of very low permeability, which makes gas extraction difficult, because - in contrast to conventional resources - gas cannot easily flow through the reservoir rock into a drilled well and travel to the surface. There are two key technologies that have made production from unconventional resources practical: Massive hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. However, the systematic development of unconventional gas resources entails substantial uncertainty and risk. Therefore, computational tools that mitigate such risk are valuable for economic development of such resources. This research focuses on developing such tools, and is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on a methodology for the analysis of production data from existing wells that can be used for future well planning. The methodology relies on standard principal component analysis (PCA) and regression (PCR), and can help answer questions such as (a) Which wells behave similarly? (b) Which wells behave differently from each other or from standard expectations? (c) What factors contribute to these differences? (d) How can data from existing wells be used to anticipate the performance of new wells? The methodology is illustrated through the analysis of historical production data from twelve wells in the Holly Branch field. The proposed methodology would be even more valuable for larger data sets, for which manual analysis of production data is more cumbersome. The second part addresses the problem of fracture design and optimization, namely, decision making on the optimum number of horizontal wells, the optimum number of transverse fractures per well, fracture dimensions, and the quantity of proppant required per fracture. For this problem, the usual strategy of parametric sensitivity analysis is time consuming and possibly ineffective. The proposed approach accounts for the complex interactions among formation and fracture properties, fracture geometry, production behaviors, design constraints and the objective function. Explicit analytical expressions are developed that can be easily used to implement the proposed methodology on problems in the field. Advisors/Committee Members: Nikolaou, Michael (advisor), Economides, Michael J. (committee member), Balakotaiah, Vemuri (committee member), Holley, Thomas K. (committee member), Lee, W. John (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Production data analysis; Principal component analysis; Production optimization; Unconventional reservoirs; Unified fracture design; Mathematical Optimization; Multiple transverse fractures; Horizontal well

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bhattacharya, S. 1. (2012). Computer-Aided Methodology for the Analysis, Design and Optimization of Production from Unconventional Gas Reservoirs. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1395

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bhattacharya, Srimoyee 1986-. “Computer-Aided Methodology for the Analysis, Design and Optimization of Production from Unconventional Gas Reservoirs.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Houston. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1395.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bhattacharya, Srimoyee 1986-. “Computer-Aided Methodology for the Analysis, Design and Optimization of Production from Unconventional Gas Reservoirs.” 2012. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Bhattacharya S1. Computer-Aided Methodology for the Analysis, Design and Optimization of Production from Unconventional Gas Reservoirs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Houston; 2012. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1395.

Council of Science Editors:

Bhattacharya S1. Computer-Aided Methodology for the Analysis, Design and Optimization of Production from Unconventional Gas Reservoirs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Houston; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/1395

.