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You searched for subject:(transdermal fentanyl). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Padgett, Ashley Loren. Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Sciences, 2018, Texas A&M University

Designing perioperative analgesic regimen for ruminants is problematic as pain assessment is difficult and pregnancy adds additional considerations. The aim of this study was to assess the nociceptive properties of intramuscularly administered buprenorphine and transdermally administered fentanyl utilizing a composite pain score system. To better confirm that the observed abnormal behavior was related to pain, the current study attempted to characterize the nociceptive properties of the analgesic agents at a given plasma drug concentration, which has not previously been done. Additionally, the study characterized transplacental movement of analgesic agents via fetal plasma drug concentrations. In this study, we compared intramuscularly administered buprenorphine at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg every 8 hours for 48 hours starting at induction for surgery (n=6) to transdermal fentanyl patches (n=6) applied in the dorsal thorax region 24 hours before surgery at a dose of 2μg/kg/hr for postoperative pain. Ewe blood samples were collected and signs of pain and sedation were measured 24 hours before surgery (time -24), induction to surgery (time 0), and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36, 48 hours after. Using an indwelling fetal arterial catheter that was placed during the surgery, fetal blood pressure was recorded and blood samples were collected. Drug concentrations were measured in maternal and fetal plasma and amniotic fluid. The buprenorphine treated ewes exhibited more pain consistent behaviors than those treated with fentanyl, and their postoperative pain scores were significantly higher than the preoperative value. There were also significant differences in cardiovascular variables from the anesthesia records between the two groups. Overall, transdermal administration of fentanyl provided adequate analgesia with little adverse effects, making it a candidate for optimal postoperative pain management in sheep. Advisors/Committee Members: Washburn, Shannon E (advisor), Lepiz, Mauricio L (committee member), Fajt, Virginia R (committee member), Patterson, Carly (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: transdermal fentanyl; opioids; pregnant sheep; buprenorphine; analgesia; anesthesia

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APA (6th Edition):

Padgett, A. L. (2018). Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174041

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Padgett, Ashley Loren. “Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174041.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Padgett, Ashley Loren. “Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep.” 2018. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Padgett AL. Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174041.

Council of Science Editors:

Padgett AL. Comparison of Transdermal Fentanyl and Intramuscularly Administered Buprenorphine for Postoperative Pain in Pregnant Sheep. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/174041


The Ohio State University

2. Lovasz, Michael F. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration.

Degree: MS, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, 2016, The Ohio State University

The objective of the study reported here was to determine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of fentanyl in alpacas after intravenous (IV) and transdermal (TD) administration.Fentanyl was administered IV (2 mcg/kg) or TD (2 mcg/kg/hr) in 6 adult alpacas. Samples of venous blood were obtained at predetermined intervals for 24 hours after IV and 96 hours after TD administration to determine plasma concentrations using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sedation score, HR, RR, and the responses to thermal and mechanical nociception were assessed at each time point. Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of fentanyl was 4.6 +/- 1.8 ng/mL after IV administration, clearance was 921 +/- 189 mL/kg/hr, volume of distribution was 4.3 +/-1.8 L/kg and elimination half-life was 3.1 hours (range 1.87-7.2 hours). Mild sedation occurred within 5 minutes of IV administration and lasted up to 45 minutes. Apparent excitement occurred in three alpacas following IV fentanyl administration. Limb mechanical threshold and abdominal algometry were significantly increased from baseline at 15 minutes and 45 minutes, respectively. Mean maximum plasma fentanyl concentration was 1.3+/- 0.8 ng/mL, mean residence time was 42 +/- 8 hours, and elimination half-life was 16.5 hours (range 10-22 hours) after TD administration. Sedation was mild in three alpacas following TD fentanyl, peaked by 24 hours and lasted up to 60 hours. Plasma fentanyl concentrations peaked and fell rapidly after IV administration. Uptake of TD fentanyl was absorption dependent, but nearly complete. The behavioral responses to IV fentanyl were inconsistent. Advisors/Committee Members: Bednarski, Richard (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Veterinary Services; Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration

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APA (6th Edition):

Lovasz, M. F. (2016). Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461173885

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lovasz, Michael F. “Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration.” 2016. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461173885.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lovasz, Michael F. “Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration.” 2016. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lovasz MF. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461173885.

Council of Science Editors:

Lovasz MF. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Fentanyl in Alpacas after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461173885


Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

3. Malavasi, Laís de Matos. Physiological and behavioral effects of opioids in pigs subjected to abdominal surgery.

Degree: 2005, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Pigs are commonly used in biomedical research, often subjected to complicated and invasive surgical procedures. The knowledge of appropriate analgesia and anaesthesia in pigs however is limited. Therefore, the general aim of the present thesis was to establish and evaluate opioid analgesia suitable for abdominal surgery in growing pigs. Isoflurane minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) was determined in growing pigs using claw pinching. Thereafter, each pig was randomly studied thrice to determine the MAC values in the following treatments: induction of anaesthesia with medetomidine and tiletamine/zolazepam given intramuscularly (MTZ); MTZ followed by epidural morphine (MTZ/M); and MTZ followed by intramuscular buprenorphine (MTZ/B). Pigs were subjected to abdominal surgery during isoflurane anaesthesia and physiological and behavioural effects of MTZ/M and MTZ/B compared to MTZ were evaluated. Transdermal fentanyl was applied and the effects were evaluated for 60 h in conscious pigs and in pigs treated with MTZ/M. Opioid serum concentrations were monitored up to 72 h after drug administration. Behaviour was analysed utilizing videotape recordings of pigs’ activity level before and after surgery. Induction of anaesthesia with MTZ reduced the isoflurane MAC in pigs by 68%. Additional epidural morphine and systemic buprenorphine decreased MTZ isoflurane MAC by 33% and 50%, respectively. Pigs treated with epidural morphine or systemic buprenorphine prior to abdominal surgery attained surgical anaesthetic depth with reduced isoflurane requirement. Induction of anaesthesia with MTZ improved arterial blood pressure and oxygenation compared to isoflurane induction. Epidural morphine did not influence the cardiorespiratory functions during anaesthesia but systemic buprenorphine affected the respiratory response in spontaneously breathing pigs. The postoperative activity level after epidural morphine was lower but the pigs gained weight and the feed intake was similar compared to before surgery. Combining epidural morphine and transdermal fentanyl resulted in initial return to regular activity levels and weight gain after surgery. Twelve hours after surgery these pigs showed decreased activity but still gained weight. Transdermal fentanyl alone in conscious pigs did not cause inactivity or sedation but resulted in inter-individual variations in fentanyl serum concentrations. Systemic buprenorphine caused unpredictable activity levels with postoperative decrease in weight and feed consumption. The analgesic properties of MTZ contributed to a substantial reduction in concentration of isoflurane required for maintenance of inhalation anaesthesia. Additional preoperative opioid analgesia further reduced the requirements of isoflurane needed to maintain an adequate anaesthetic depth. The opioids evaluated resulted in different behaviour postoperatively. Pigs treated with epidural morphine with or without transdermal fentanyl had good appetite and gained weight after abdominal surgery indicating improved postoperative recovery.

Subjects/Keywords: swine; anaesthesia; analgesics; morphine; pain; behaviour; surgical operations; laboratory diagnosis; swine; anaesthesia; analgesia; epidural morphine; buprenorphine; transdermal fentanyl; minimal alveolar concentration; isoflurane; pain assessment; behaviour

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Malavasi, L. d. M. (2005). Physiological and behavioral effects of opioids in pigs subjected to abdominal surgery. (Doctoral Dissertation). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Retrieved from http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/939/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Malavasi, Laís de Matos. “Physiological and behavioral effects of opioids in pigs subjected to abdominal surgery.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/939/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Malavasi, Laís de Matos. “Physiological and behavioral effects of opioids in pigs subjected to abdominal surgery.” 2005. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Malavasi LdM. Physiological and behavioral effects of opioids in pigs subjected to abdominal surgery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2005. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/939/.

Council of Science Editors:

Malavasi LdM. Physiological and behavioral effects of opioids in pigs subjected to abdominal surgery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2005. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/939/

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