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You searched for subject:(tire soil interaction). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Ontario Institute of Technology

1. Marjani, Mehrsa. Development of FEA wide-base truck tire and soil interaction models.

Degree: 2016, University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Tires are considered one of the most important components of ground vehicles as they are the only link between the chassis and ground. They support the vehicle weight and cushion road surface irregularities to provide a comfortable ride. Tires are designed in a way that provide necessary tractive, braking, and cornering forces to form a safe and stable ride for ground vehicles. Recent advancements in computerized and virtual modeling provided an efficient methodology for accurate prediction of tire characteristics. In this thesis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is employed as a method to accurately construct a new virtual wide-base tire model, validate it, and then study rolling resistance of the tire on a hard surface. This thesis includes tire-soil interaction and effects of soil on tires rolling resistance. To accurately study rolling resistance on soft soil, various soil models are created by using FEA and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), as a representative of dry sand soil. Soil models are calibrated by using shear-displacement and pressure-sinkage simulation tests. The simulation results are then compared to published data. Also, the created soil models are compared to each other to determine the optimum one based on computational time efficiency and accuracy. SPH, as the accurate current method for soil modeling, has long computational solving time. In this thesis FEA/SPH hybrid soil models are studied and modified to achieve lower computational solving time while having the desirable accuracy. Rolling resistance of tire on each soil model is carried out through various loads and inflation pressures and the simulation results are compared to physical test results to examine the accuracy of each soil model. The new hybrid soil model created in this thesis reduces the computational CPU time almost by half and slightly increases accuracy compared to full SPH soil model. Advisors/Committee Members: El-Gindy, Moustafa.

Subjects/Keywords: FEA wide-base tire modeling; SPH soil model; Hybrid SPH/FEA soil model; Tire/terrain interaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Marjani, M. (2016). Development of FEA wide-base truck tire and soil interaction models. (Thesis). University of Ontario Institute of Technology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10155/680

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marjani, Mehrsa. “Development of FEA wide-base truck tire and soil interaction models.” 2016. Thesis, University of Ontario Institute of Technology. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10155/680.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marjani, Mehrsa. “Development of FEA wide-base truck tire and soil interaction models.” 2016. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Marjani M. Development of FEA wide-base truck tire and soil interaction models. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ontario Institute of Technology; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10155/680.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Marjani M. Development of FEA wide-base truck tire and soil interaction models. [Thesis]. University of Ontario Institute of Technology; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10155/680

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Penn State University

2. Lescoe, Ryan. Improvement of Soil Modeling in a Tire-Soil Interaction Using Finite Element Analysis and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics .

Degree: 2010, Penn State University

In recent years, the advancement of computerized modeling has allowed for the creation of extensive pneumatic tire models. These models have been used to determine many tire properties and tire-road interaction parameters which are either prohibitively expensive or unavailable with physical models. More recently, computerized modeling has been used to explore tire-soil interactions. The new parameters created by these interactions were defined for these models, but accurate soil constitutive equations were lacking. With the previous models, the soil was simulated using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with soil material models requiring calibration and validation. Furthermore, the meshless modeling method of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) may be a viable approach to more accurately simulating large soil deformations and complex tire-soil interactions. For this thesis, a rigid tire model is used to perform an extensive sensitivity study on the previously used FEA soft soil (dense sand) in order to determine the importance of mesh size, soil plot size, and edge constraints. Then, parameters for SPH particles are determined for either complete or partial replacement of FEA elements in the soil model. Rolling resistance tests are conducted with a rigid tire model for different SPH and FEA/SPH soil models and compared to the previously determined best FEA soil model. Replacement of FEA elements with SPH particles is found to be the key variable as using a deeper amount of SPH particles increases rolling resistance while increasing the SPH particle density has little effect on rolling resistance. These results are then replicated using a pneumatic tire model. For further validation, pressure-sinkage tests are conducted with the FEA and SPH soils to explore the differences in the two soil modeling methods. Also, shear-displacement tests are conducted with the SPH soil—a test which cannot easily be performed with an FEA soil model. These shear tests show that the SPH soil behaves more like a clay in initial shearing and more like a sand by exhibiting increased shearing due to vertical loading. Furthermore, both the pressure-sinkage and shear-displacement tests still indicate that a larger particle density is unnecessary.  Advisors/Committee Members: Moustafa El Gindy, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, Moustafa El Gindy, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, Kevin L Koudela, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: smoothed; smooth particle hydrodynamics; FEA; finite element analysis; tire-soil interaction; soil modeling; SPH; PAM-Crash; PAM-Shock; pneumatic tire; rigid tire

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lescoe, R. (2010). Improvement of Soil Modeling in a Tire-Soil Interaction Using Finite Element Analysis and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics . (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/10823

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lescoe, Ryan. “Improvement of Soil Modeling in a Tire-Soil Interaction Using Finite Element Analysis and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics .” 2010. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed January 22, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/10823.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lescoe, Ryan. “Improvement of Soil Modeling in a Tire-Soil Interaction Using Finite Element Analysis and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics .” 2010. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lescoe R. Improvement of Soil Modeling in a Tire-Soil Interaction Using Finite Element Analysis and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics . [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/10823.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lescoe R. Improvement of Soil Modeling in a Tire-Soil Interaction Using Finite Element Analysis and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics . [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2010. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/10823

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Virginia Tech

3. Senatore, Carmine. Prediction of mobility, handling, and tractive efficiency of wheeled off-road vehicles.

Degree: PhD, Engineering Science and Mechanics, 2010, Virginia Tech

Our society is heavily and intrinsically dependent on energy transformation and usage. In a world scenario where resources are being depleted while their demand is increasing, it is crucial to optimize every process. During the last decade the concept of energy efficiency has become a leitmotif in several fields and has directly influenced our everyday life: from light bulbs to airplane turbines, there has been a general shift from pure performance to better efficiency. In this vein, we focus on the mobility and tractive efficiency of off-road vehicles. These vehicles are adopted in military, agriculture, construction, exploration, recreation, and mining applications and are intended to operate on soft, deformable terrain. The performance of off-road vehicles is deeply influenced by the tire-soil interaction mechanism. Soft soil can drastically reduce the traction performance of tires up to the point of making motion impossible. In this study, a tire model able to predict the performance of rigid wheels and flexible tires is developed. The model follows a semi-empirical approach for steady-state conditions and predicts basic features, such as the drawbar pull, the driving torque and the lateral force, as well as complex behaviors, such as the slip-sinkage phenomenon and the multi-pass effect. The tractive efficiency of different tire-soil configurations is simulated and discussed. To investigate the handling and the traction efficiency, the tire model is implemented into a four-wheel vehicle model. Several tire geometries, vehicle configurations (FWD, RWD, AWD), soil types, and terrain profiles are considered to evaluate the performance under different simulation scenarios. The simulation environment represents an effective tool to realistically analyze the impact of tire parameters (size, inflation pressure) and torque distribution on the energy efficiency. It is verified that larger tires and decreased inflation pressure generally provide better traction and energy efficiency (under steady-state working conditions). The torque distribution strategy between the axles deeply affects the traction and the efficiency: the two variables canâ t clearly be maximized at the same time and a trade-off has to be found. Advisors/Committee Members: Cramer, Mark S. (committee member), Hendricks, Scott L. (committee member), Dowling, Norman E. (committee member), Sandu, Corina (committeecochair), Ross, Shane D. (committeecochair).

Subjects/Keywords: tire dynamics; tractive efficiency; energy efficiency; tire soil interaction; off-road; torque distribution; fuel economy; lateral force; multi pass

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Senatore, C. (2010). Prediction of mobility, handling, and tractive efficiency of wheeled off-road vehicles. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/37781

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Senatore, Carmine. “Prediction of mobility, handling, and tractive efficiency of wheeled off-road vehicles.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/37781.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Senatore, Carmine. “Prediction of mobility, handling, and tractive efficiency of wheeled off-road vehicles.” 2010. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Senatore C. Prediction of mobility, handling, and tractive efficiency of wheeled off-road vehicles. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/37781.

Council of Science Editors:

Senatore C. Prediction of mobility, handling, and tractive efficiency of wheeled off-road vehicles. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/37781

.