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You searched for subject:(tetrahexylammonium). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Wright State University

1. Hart, Morgan M. Cationic Exchange Reactions Involving Dilithium Phthalocyanine.

Degree: MS, Chemistry, 2009, Wright State University

Dilithium phthalocyanine (Li2Pc) consists of an aromatic macrocyclepossessing a doubly negative charge and two Li+ counterions. One Li+ ion is easilydisplaceable while the other remains coordinated to the phthalocyanine ring. Thedisplaceable Li+ cation can be exchanged with other cations, such as a singly chargedtetra-alkyl ammonium cation, by using several variations of a general procedure. It hasbeen demonstrated that tetraalkylammonium lithium phthalocyanines (TAA-LiPcs) canbe successfully and reproducibly synthesized with yields ranging from 54.5% up to64.3%. All TAA-LiPcs demonstrated poor solubilities from approximately <0.2 mg/mLto 5 mg/ml in the solvents tested (with the exception of tetrapropylammonium lithiumphthalocyanine and tetrahexylammonium lithium phthalocyanine). All of the TAA-LiPcssynthesized were dark-purple in color, with the exception of tetraheptylammoniumlithium phthalocyanine and tetraoctylammonium lithium phthalocyanine. These twocompounds were dark –blue in color. Melting points varied greatly from >370.4°C to157.9°C and depended greatly upon the alkyl-chain length of the exchanged cation. Advisors/Committee Members: Feld, William A. (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Chemistry; synthesis; cation exchange; dilithium phthalocyanine; lithium; tetrapropylammonium; tetrabutylammonium; tetrahexylammonium; tetraheptylammonium; tetraoctylammonium; NMR; powder XRD; IR; UV-Vis; solubility

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hart, M. M. (2009). Cationic Exchange Reactions Involving Dilithium Phthalocyanine. (Masters Thesis). Wright State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wright1262102935

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hart, Morgan M. “Cationic Exchange Reactions Involving Dilithium Phthalocyanine.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Wright State University. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wright1262102935.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hart, Morgan M. “Cationic Exchange Reactions Involving Dilithium Phthalocyanine.” 2009. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Hart MM. Cationic Exchange Reactions Involving Dilithium Phthalocyanine. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Wright State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wright1262102935.

Council of Science Editors:

Hart MM. Cationic Exchange Reactions Involving Dilithium Phthalocyanine. [Masters Thesis]. Wright State University; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wright1262102935


Georgia Tech

2. Newton, Elizabeth Lynn. Sustainable Reaction and Separation Systems.

Degree: MS, Chemical Engineering, 2005, Georgia Tech

With increasing environmental awareness and natural resource limitations, researchers must begin to incorporate sustainability into their process and product designs. One target for green engineering is in reaction and separation design. This is typically done in a wasteful and often toxic manner with organic solvents and lack of recycle. The following thesis discusses alternatives to these costly separations by means of ionic liquids, benign extraction, separation with carbon dioxide, and near critical water. Ionic liquids are combined with carbon dioxide to induce melting point depressions of up to 124 degrees Celsius. Using this system as a reaction medium will offer control over the reaction phases while utilizing green solvents. Benign extractions are performed on both ferulic acid and on proteins from biomass by replacing alkaline solvents and costly protein separation techniques with simple liquid-liquid extraction. This means simpler systems and less waste than from previous methods. This thesis also discusses an opportunity for more efficient separation and recycle of a pharmaceutical catalyst, Mn-Salen. Using carbon dioxide with the organic aqueous tunable solvent system, the reaction can be run homogeneously and the product and catalyst separated heterogeneously, thus creating an extremely efficient process. Lastly, near critical water is used as an extraction and reaction medium by extracting ferulic acid from Brewers Spent Grain and then catalyzing its transformation to 4-vinylguaiacol. In this manner a simple, benign process is used to turn waste into valuable chemicals. Although somewhat different, each of the studied processes strives to eliminate waste and toxicity of many commonly used reaction and separation techniques, thus creating safe and sustainable processes. Advisors/Committee Members: Eckert, Charles (Committee Chair), Liotta, Charles (Committee Co-Chair), Teja, Amyn (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate; Tetrahexylammonium bromide; Lysozyme; Bovine serum albumin; Indene; BSG; Ferulic acid; 4-VG; Indinavir; Mixtures; Separation (Technology); Chemical engineering; Chemical processes; Liquids

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Newton, E. L. (2005). Sustainable Reaction and Separation Systems. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7463

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Newton, Elizabeth Lynn. “Sustainable Reaction and Separation Systems.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7463.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Newton, Elizabeth Lynn. “Sustainable Reaction and Separation Systems.” 2005. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Newton EL. Sustainable Reaction and Separation Systems. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7463.

Council of Science Editors:

Newton EL. Sustainable Reaction and Separation Systems. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7463

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