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University of Southern California

1. Chan, Felicity Hwee-Hwa. Shades of conflict and conviviality: negotiating intercultural living and integration in Los Angeles's globalizing multi-ethnic spaces.

Degree: PhD, Policy, Planning and Development, 2013, University of Southern California

The contested process of sharing lives and space in contemporary culturally diverse globalizing cities challenges head-on the inadequacy of abstract discourses about integration that do not address the daily palpable experience of negotiating the tensions of diversity. These tensions are produced by the intersections of real and imagined differences in expectations, values and ways of life between different ethnicities and nationalities that often find expressions in and through their use of urban space. This new set of globalizing dynamics will inexorably require that policies, plans and designs of new urban interventions in globalizing multi-ethnic spaces consider these tensions carefully and their implications for intercultural integration. However, there is a relative silence in empirical scholarship about how inhabitants in diversity negotiate everyday integration and the kinds of urban space that facilitate intercultural understanding (ICU). ❧ This dissertation begins from the everyday multi-ethnic spaces of globalizing Los Angeles. I used mixed methods of cognitive mapping, ethnographic and semi-structured interviews and survey to understand the inhabitants’ experiences of negotiating the tensions of diversity through the sharing of social space, and to discover the existing possibilities of local neighborhood spaces for ICU. Framing the investigation with Lefebvre’s (1991) conceptualization of the production of social space as a dialectical triad of conceived-perceived-lived space in the form of an innovative rotating tetrahedron that combines with Lofland’s (1998) theory of the public realm and Lynch’s ([1960] 1998) method of cognitive mapping, I discuss how the sharing of social space is negotiated through nested boundaries, territories and routines in three multi-ethnic and multi-national settings of different socio-economic status (San Marino, Central Long Beach and Mid-Wilshire) within metropolitan Los Angeles. ❧ I found that ordinary Los Angelenos who live in multi-ethnic diversity maintain in their daily lives a fleeting and routinized co-presence with their neighbors of different ethnicities and nationalities, adopting a range of prosaic “negotiation” that includes “hunkering down” (Putnam 2007), adopting a “civility of indifference” (Bailey 1996), creating “comfort zones,” living in “ethnic bubbles,” trading racial slurs and harboring prejudices in private. Conviviality in diversity is occasional but rare, transient and does little to transform longer term relationships in existing inter-ethnic ties. The dissertation illustrates that these prosaic negotiations in shades of conflict and conviviality are in fact critical in shaping the formation of the sense of local belonging and the possibilities for intercultural living and integration in settings of diversity. ❧ Based on the findings, I argue that public space and institutional initiative and intervention is extremely important to the formation of an ethos and practice of intercultural living. To support this argument, the dissertation presents the… Advisors/Committee Members: Banerjee, Tridib K. (Committee Chair), Renteln, Alison Dundes (Committee Member), Hoskins, Janet A. (Committee Member), Myers, Dowell (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: globalizing; intercultural understanding; everyday integration; conviviality; multi-ethnic spaces; Lefebvre; tensions of diversity; Los Angeles; San Marino; Central Long Beach; Mid-Wilshire; sharing space; public space; boundaries; territories

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chan, F. H. (2013). Shades of conflict and conviviality: negotiating intercultural living and integration in Los Angeles's globalizing multi-ethnic spaces. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/291486/rec/5821

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chan, Felicity Hwee-Hwa. “Shades of conflict and conviviality: negotiating intercultural living and integration in Los Angeles's globalizing multi-ethnic spaces.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 28, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/291486/rec/5821.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chan, Felicity Hwee-Hwa. “Shades of conflict and conviviality: negotiating intercultural living and integration in Los Angeles's globalizing multi-ethnic spaces.” 2013. Web. 28 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Chan FH. Shades of conflict and conviviality: negotiating intercultural living and integration in Los Angeles's globalizing multi-ethnic spaces. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 28]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/291486/rec/5821.

Council of Science Editors:

Chan FH. Shades of conflict and conviviality: negotiating intercultural living and integration in Los Angeles's globalizing multi-ethnic spaces. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/291486/rec/5821

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