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You searched for subject:(tenancy sustainment). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Plymouth

1. Boland, Leonie. Transitioning from homelessness into a sustained tenancy : what enables successful tenancy sustainment? (The Moving on Project).

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Plymouth

For individuals with multiple and complex needs, leaving homelessness is recognised as a dynamic and complex process. Furthermore, despite the provision of supports, tenancies may not be maintained and individuals return to using homelessness services. Tenancy sustainment—the maintenance of a tenancy to avoid a premature end of tenure—is fundamental to the resolution and prevention of homelessness. There is a paucity of research about the occupations of individuals as they establish and maintain tenancies. This thesis aimed to understand the transition process from homelessness, and tenancy sustainment, from an occupational perspective, to inform a potential occupational therapy intervention. Underpinned by the Medical Research Council (2008) framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions, a systematic review and a constructivist grounded theory study were conducted in a convergent mixed method study design. The systematic review synthesised the evidence on tenancy sustainment following homelessness from a broad range of studies. It presented positive determinants of tenancy sustainment at individual, interpersonal, community and structural levels. The constructivist grounded theory study was conducted with people who were experiencing or had experienced multiple exclusion homelessness as well as staff in homelessness services. Individuals (n=35) were purposively sampled and interviews using reflexive photography were conducted. A substantive theory about the core process of tenancy sustainment was conceptualised as ‘Making a Home’. This was enacted through identified occupational strategies of ‘putting your stamp on it’, ‘seeing a new self’ and ‘living the life’. Tenancy sustainment was experienced as ‘feeling at home’, which had two sub-categories: ‘belonging’, which was a sense of connection to place, as well as, ‘having connections’ to other people. The key mediating factor to enable tenancy sustainment was taking control over activities. The findings were synthesised to propose a framework of factors that influence successful tenancy sustainment. Engagement in occupations, as individuals established and sustained tenancies, provided a sense of well-being, a sense of control as well as social connections. This indicates the value, to all who support individuals leave homelessness, of providing opportunities and supporting tenants to engage in personally meaningful occupations. In addition, this thesis provides a foundation for the development of an occupational therapy intervention for tenancy sustainment following homelessness.

Subjects/Keywords: tenancy sustainment; occupational therapy; occupational science; transition; tenancy; multiple exclusion homelessness; homeless persons

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boland, L. (2018). Transitioning from homelessness into a sustained tenancy : what enables successful tenancy sustainment? (The Moving on Project). (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Plymouth. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11660

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boland, Leonie. “Transitioning from homelessness into a sustained tenancy : what enables successful tenancy sustainment? (The Moving on Project).” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Plymouth. Accessed November 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11660.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boland, Leonie. “Transitioning from homelessness into a sustained tenancy : what enables successful tenancy sustainment? (The Moving on Project).” 2018. Web. 13 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Boland L. Transitioning from homelessness into a sustained tenancy : what enables successful tenancy sustainment? (The Moving on Project). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Plymouth; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11660.

Council of Science Editors:

Boland L. Transitioning from homelessness into a sustained tenancy : what enables successful tenancy sustainment? (The Moving on Project). [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Plymouth; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/11660


University of Stirling

2. Stewart, Alasdair B. R. Managing a Tenancy: Young people's pathways into and sustaining independent tenancies from homelessness.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Stirling

Due to their disproportionate risk of tenancy non-sustainment there have been concerns raised for young people making a pathway out of homelessness into independent living. Despite these concerns, there has been limited research looking at how young people experience tenancy sustainment or where they move onto after terminating a tenancy. This thesis, drawing on Bourdieu’s (1990a) theory of practice, presents a reconceptualisation of tenancy sustainment as a practice of sustaining a tenancy. The theoretical-empirical analysis is based on data collected through longitudinal research involving two waves of semi- structured interviews with 25 young people, aged 16-25, who had recently made a pathway out of homelessness into their own independent tenancies. The interdependency between a tenant and their tenancy presented young people with pressures which they developed techniques of independent living in response to in order to sustain their tenancy and make it a home. Young people not only had a particular housing position of being a tenant, they held family and education-employment positions which took part in the formation and shaping of the pressures they experienced living independently. Tenancies were not seen as an end in themselves by young people who desired, through the experience of sustaining a tenancy, increasingly independent positions within their other social positions as well. An uneven process of actually existing neoliberalism across policy areas through its influence on young people’s constellation of interdependent relations also created a dissonance within the positions held by young people fostering social suffering. Young people ending a tenancy viewed this as a ‘step backwards’ when it meant decreasing independence such as a return to supported accommodation; ambivalence where it arose from the end of a relationship; and as a move forwards, or ‘getting on with life’, when making a youth transition and housing pathway towards establishing their own family household.

Subjects/Keywords: tenancy sustainment; homelessness; young people; housing pathways; Bourdieu; independent living; Adulthood (Psychology); Homeless youth Services for; Young adults Housing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stewart, A. B. R. (2013). Managing a Tenancy: Young people's pathways into and sustaining independent tenancies from homelessness. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Stirling. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20409

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stewart, Alasdair B R. “Managing a Tenancy: Young people's pathways into and sustaining independent tenancies from homelessness.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Stirling. Accessed November 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20409.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stewart, Alasdair B R. “Managing a Tenancy: Young people's pathways into and sustaining independent tenancies from homelessness.” 2013. Web. 13 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Stewart ABR. Managing a Tenancy: Young people's pathways into and sustaining independent tenancies from homelessness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20409.

Council of Science Editors:

Stewart ABR. Managing a Tenancy: Young people's pathways into and sustaining independent tenancies from homelessness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Stirling; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20409

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