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You searched for subject:(teacher cynicism). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Oklahoma

1. Beard, Vicki. Examining the Relationship between Cynicism and Instructional Change.

Degree: EdD, 2019, University of Oklahoma

Instructional practices today remain heavily centered and oriented around the teacher despite decades of educational reform efforts. Curriculum has changed, technology usage has increased, and standards have evolved; however, most instruction is still centered around the teacher or teaching with limited opportunities for students to apply knowledge to unique situations and challenges. While teachers are fundamental to the learning process, instruction must shift focus from teacher to student for deeper learning to take place. The paucity of instructional change leads us to ask: What are possible barriers to teacher’s lack of willingness to change instructional practices? Considering this question through the lens of change theory, this research explores what possible barriers might impede the instructional change process. One possible barrier considered is teacher cynicism. It is considered that teacher cynicism might act as a barrier to teacher’s willingness to change their instructional practices. Therefore, this research has application for how teachers and administrators can adjust to improve the implementation process when teachers are asked to make changes to their instructional processes. Advisors/Committee Members: Adams, Curt (advisor), Forsyth, Patrick (committee member), Ballard, Keith (committee member), Edwards, Beverly (committee member), Lake, Vickie (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: cynicism; teacher cynicism; instructional change; change

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Beard, V. (2019). Examining the Relationship between Cynicism and Instructional Change. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/319769

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Beard, Vicki. “Examining the Relationship between Cynicism and Instructional Change.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/319769.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Beard, Vicki. “Examining the Relationship between Cynicism and Instructional Change.” 2019. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Beard V. Examining the Relationship between Cynicism and Instructional Change. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2019. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/319769.

Council of Science Editors:

Beard V. Examining the Relationship between Cynicism and Instructional Change. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/319769


North Carolina State University

2. Burke, Julie Machlin. Disentangling Preservice Teachers from the Webs of Idle Talk: A Grounded Theory for Generative Teacher Education.

Degree: PhD, Educational Research and Policy Analysis, 2003, North Carolina State University

The purpose of this research was to understand the possibilities for helping preservice teachers develop cynicism and joy dialectically so that they might engage in critique and develop hopefulness. A sustained dialectic of cynicism and joy in teacher education enables preservice teachers and other educators perceive injustices and inequities and to remain hopeful about the possibilities for liberatory education. Thus, it is possible to sustain conviction, resist oppression and act creatively. I analyzed 161 preservice teachers' philosophy papers produced over three semesters in seven sections of Introduction to Teaching course I taught at a major research university in the South. I used grounded theory methods to develop a generative theory for teacher education. Three major conceptual constructs developed from my analysis: reality, fun and passion. Using these as a framework, theory was developed to understand preservice teachers' attitudes against critique and towards naïve optimism. Using the constructs reality, fun and passion I discovered deep roots that bound preservice teachers to stereotypes of good teachers and appropriate pedagogies. Cultural, historical and social structures kept preservice teachers from recognizing the possibilities for thinking critically without giving up hope. These deeply embedded structures interfered with preservice teachers' ability to engage in conversations and struggle with the meanings of good teaching beyond management and control. Most preservice teachers in this study had not engaged in critical analysis of common sense discourses about teaching. Most entered a state of denial when pressed to question inequitable, unjust and disproportionate institutions in education. Denial limited the possibilities for moving past despair and into hope and action. Preservice teachers in denial survive by maintaining the status quo. They do not experience joy which is a force for social action because they do not engage in critique. When teachers are in denial imagination, energy and faith are severely limited. Questions my research centered on the value of integrating spirituality into critical teacher education, the necessity of social foundations, and the validity of interdisciplinary research in teacher education. Advisors/Committee Members: Anna V. Wilson, Committee Chair (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: grounded theory; teacher education; curriculum theory; joy; cynicism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burke, J. M. (2003). Disentangling Preservice Teachers from the Webs of Idle Talk: A Grounded Theory for Generative Teacher Education. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4971

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burke, Julie Machlin. “Disentangling Preservice Teachers from the Webs of Idle Talk: A Grounded Theory for Generative Teacher Education.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed September 23, 2020. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4971.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burke, Julie Machlin. “Disentangling Preservice Teachers from the Webs of Idle Talk: A Grounded Theory for Generative Teacher Education.” 2003. Web. 23 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Burke JM. Disentangling Preservice Teachers from the Webs of Idle Talk: A Grounded Theory for Generative Teacher Education. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2003. [cited 2020 Sep 23]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4971.

Council of Science Editors:

Burke JM. Disentangling Preservice Teachers from the Webs of Idle Talk: A Grounded Theory for Generative Teacher Education. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2003. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4971

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