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You searched for subject:(talking therapies). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Edinburgh

1. Ramage, Michelle. Tales from the edge : sufferers' perspectives of the role of psychotherapy in recovery from anorexia nervosa.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Edinburgh

As a psychotherapist working in the field of eating disorders, I have a long-standing interest in accessing the subjective expertise of a wider group of sufferers, including what it is like and what it means to suffer from anorexia, the factors that help to support recovery and the role psychotherapy plays in contributing towards the recovery process. This study provides a timely addition to the literature on the nature and role of psychotherapy as a treatment for anorexia. Studies that explore the sufferer’s understanding and experience of developing anorexia are extremely limited and a gap exists in examining the role of psychotherapy from the recipient’s position and the ways in which psychotherapy supports an individual's recovery process. However, as this thesis demonstrates, people who have suffered and recovered from anorexia hold valuable information on the factors that support recovery and their expertise as recipients of psychotherapy has much to teach clinicians and researchers in the field of eating disorders. The theoretical foundation of this study conceptualises experience in relation to its narration. I recruited twelve participants drawn from across Scotland who provided narrative data during a focus group and a semi structured individual interview. Participants provided experiential accounts on developing anorexia, on recovery and the role of psychotherapy in their recovery process. A phenomenological approach to data analysis was deployed using Smith et al’s (2009) Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) as a methodological guide. Drawing upon an IPA methodology I identified a number of central themes. Within accounts of developing anorexia, themes relating to interpersonal attachment, trauma and/or identity played a central role in the illness beliefs and experiences of participants. Within accounts of recovery, participants offered two main framings. The first defined recovery as an achievable completion point, signally the end of illness. The second defined recovery as an on-going process concerned more with the management of anorexia than the elimination of it. Factors that support recovery included those that are integral to the individual participant as well as those that are made available by their environment. In accounts of the role of psychotherapy, a number of common factors across participants’ experiences of psychotherapy were identified spanning support, learning and action factors. In addition, the quality of the therapeutic relationship with the psychotherapist played a crucial role in supporting the recovery process. I argue that participant beliefs about and experiences of recovery directly relate to their understandings and perceptions about what precipitated anorexia. Recovery took place when changes could be made in relation to these significant themes and psychotherapy was most effective when it addressed these issues as part of the psychotherapy process. The findings from this study point to the importance of working with the subjective understandings and beliefs…

Subjects/Keywords: anorexia; recovery; talking therapies

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APA (6th Edition):

Ramage, M. (2013). Tales from the edge : sufferers' perspectives of the role of psychotherapy in recovery from anorexia nervosa. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8036

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramage, Michelle. “Tales from the edge : sufferers' perspectives of the role of psychotherapy in recovery from anorexia nervosa.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Edinburgh. Accessed July 07, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8036.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramage, Michelle. “Tales from the edge : sufferers' perspectives of the role of psychotherapy in recovery from anorexia nervosa.” 2013. Web. 07 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Ramage M. Tales from the edge : sufferers' perspectives of the role of psychotherapy in recovery from anorexia nervosa. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8036.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramage M. Tales from the edge : sufferers' perspectives of the role of psychotherapy in recovery from anorexia nervosa. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8036


University of New South Wales

2. Milham, Therese. Evaluating Clinical Performance in Psychiatry, Psychology and Social Work.

Degree: Social Sciences, 2012, University of New South Wales

Evaluation is highly integrated into clinical practice in psychiatry, psychology and social work in the ‘talking therapies’. Within these disciplines and the field there has been ongoing interest, but no comprehensive account of evaluation processes, the influences on them, and their relationship to each other and to clinical performance. This knowledge gap is explored here and provides the first comprehensive overview of clinical evaluation and performance in and across the disciplines in the talking therapies.Although talking therapy is used by a range of health practitioners, this study focuses on the disciplines of psychiatry, psychology and social work, which dominate the field, and to which the subsets of counselling, psychoanalysis and psychotherapy are often linked. The target group comprises a broad range of participants, covering different: levels of experience; systems of employment; profit and not-for-profit practice; geographic location; and training and theoretical orientation. The study uses an inductive qualitative approach, triangulated by subject and data gathering process, with a questionnaire, interview and response validation. Pilot testing of the questionnaire and interview informed the main study. Participants self-selected from a mail out of the questionnaire to all members of the psychiatry and social work professional associations and psychologists in health services. From a summary comparison across the disciplines emerged six findings. While one extended knowledge on the stages of evaluation and another confirmed the importance of a repertoire of evaluation processes, the findings on hierarchy of value, common purpose and functions, and ten cross-disciplinary themes are unique. The themes include evaluation processes, workforce, pathways, theoretical orientation, personal attributes, knowledge and skill, capacity, sustainability and remediation. From a critical analysis of the ten themes the three concepts—scrutiny, connectedness and habituation—emerged as the ‘active agents’ in clinical evaluation and performance. While each ‘active agent’ has practice implications and theoretical foundations, they are interrelated. When the ‘active agents’ converge they produce the greatest effect on clinical performance by providing safety and security for clinicians and clients. The convergence of the ‘active agents’ has implications for clients, clinicians, professional associations and employing agencies through risk, standards, quality, recruitment and retention, learning and teaching.

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical performance; psychiatry; psychology; social work; talking therapies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Milham, T. (2012). Evaluating Clinical Performance in Psychiatry, Psychology and Social Work. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52518 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11191/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Milham, Therese. “Evaluating Clinical Performance in Psychiatry, Psychology and Social Work.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed July 07, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52518 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11191/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Milham, Therese. “Evaluating Clinical Performance in Psychiatry, Psychology and Social Work.” 2012. Web. 07 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Milham T. Evaluating Clinical Performance in Psychiatry, Psychology and Social Work. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 07]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52518 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11191/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Milham T. Evaluating Clinical Performance in Psychiatry, Psychology and Social Work. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52518 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11191/SOURCE01?view=true


University of Otago

3. Nolan, Dawn. Factors that influence the uptake and continuing practice of Interpersonal Psychotherapy by frontline mental health clinicians following formal training .

Degree: University of Otago

Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) was initially developed by Gerald Klerman and colleagues in 1968 as a time limited treatment for depression in a research setting. Since then international empirical studies have proved IPT to be an effective treatment for a wide age range of patients, from differing cultural groups, in a variety of psychiatric conditions such as affective disorders, Markowitz and Weissman (2004), anxiety disorders, Lipsitz, Markowitz, Cherry & Fyer (1999) and eating disorders, Agras, Walsh, Fairburn, Wilson & Kraemer (2000). Providing access to evidence based treatment is a focus of New Zealand mental health guidelines, and recommendations have been made for the dissemination and implementation of talking therapies throughout the sectors of New Zealand mental health care (Te Pou., 2007, 2009, 2012). Interpersonal Psychotherapy is one of the few recommended therapies. A review of emergent literature had identified a gap in current research specifically investigating factors that influence the uptake of IPT by mental health clinicians in New Zealand. However, international studies show the uptake of evidence based treatments like IPT by frontline clinicians following training can be variable (Paley, Shapiro, Myers, Patrick & Reid, 2003), (Reay, Stuart & Owen, 2003), and (Sin & Scully, 2008). Te Pou., (2012) concluded that there is variability of access to talking therapies in New Zealand, and that this must be addressed to meet demand by 2020. This small study examined factors that influence the uptake and continuing practice of IPT, by frontline clinicians following training. Purposive sampling identified three cohorts of Post Graduate IPT students from Otago University who were at year one, year three, and year six post training, from which eight students consented to participate in the research. Applying Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis methods, semi-structured recorded interviews explored the participants’ personal experiences to understand the individual experiences of clinicians before, during and after training as IPT therapists, in order to explore what aspects of these experiences may have influenced their decisions related to practising IPT, and the extent to which these clinicians have continued to use IPT in routine clinical practice. Demographic data and a research diary provided additional contextual data. The qualitative data was analysed progressively, first from an idiographic perspective, generating emerging themes from individual interviews, and then searching for convergence and divergence in the emergent themes across the groups of participants. The data was drawn together in a structured format and the findings were presented in an interpretative narrative summary, evidenced by extracts from the original data. This information was then integrated with the demographic data. In the discussion three factors that may influence the implementation and dissemination of IPT were highlighted. The first factor being core and post graduate training in psychological… Advisors/Committee Members: Luty, Sue (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: interpersonal psychotherapy; psychological interventions; talking therapies; mental health clinicians

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nolan, D. (n.d.). Factors that influence the uptake and continuing practice of Interpersonal Psychotherapy by frontline mental health clinicians following formal training . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4988

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nolan, Dawn. “Factors that influence the uptake and continuing practice of Interpersonal Psychotherapy by frontline mental health clinicians following formal training .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed July 07, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4988.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nolan, Dawn. “Factors that influence the uptake and continuing practice of Interpersonal Psychotherapy by frontline mental health clinicians following formal training .” Web. 07 Jul 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Nolan D. Factors that influence the uptake and continuing practice of Interpersonal Psychotherapy by frontline mental health clinicians following formal training . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2020 Jul 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4988.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Nolan D. Factors that influence the uptake and continuing practice of Interpersonal Psychotherapy by frontline mental health clinicians following formal training . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4988

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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