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You searched for subject:(talkback radio). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Hanson-Easey, Scott. Out of Africa : Sudanese refugees and the construction of difference in political and lay talk.

Degree: 2011, University of Adelaide

Over the last ten years, more than 20,000 Sudanese refugees have resettled in Australia and have been granted permanent residency. This new cohort of refugees has entered Australia via the federal government’s offshore component of the Refugee and Humanitarian Programme, sanctioned by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Although there exists a cluster of discourse analytic work that examines debates surrounding asylum seekers that arrive by boat (often labelled as ‘illegal immigrants’), there is a dearth of discursive psychological work that analyses how humanitarian refugees are constructed in political and everyday talk. This thesis addresses that gap by examining how humanitarian refugees, entering Australia under the auspices of the government, are represented and accounted for in public discourse and conversation. Employing a critical discursive psychological approach, this thesis analyses political interviews and lay talkback radio calls, to examine in close detail some of the manifold rhetorical practices that speakers deploy when constructing and advancing arguments that represent Sudanese refugees as ostensibly ‘different’. The first Chapter of this thesis introduces previous critical discursive research on refugees and asylum seekers in Australia, The United Kingdom, Spain and Canada. This literature suggests that refugees and asylum seekers are accounted for as ‘illegal’; as constituting a ‘threat’ to the nations they seek refuge in, and as ‘deviant’. These representations are argued to question the legitimacy of refugees’ claims for asylum, and thereby justifying punitive policies of exclusion. I also discuss how preconceptions of the nation-state underpin much of the discourse of delegitimation and threat instantiated in the reviewed research. Chapter 2 provides an overview¹ of the methodology employed in this thesis. Employing a ‘synthetic’ (Wetherell, 1998) critical social psychological approach, I delineate how I came to chose this epistemology and discuss some of the assumptions it holds in relations to language. I also discuss the institutional settings and data that the four analytic Chapters give attention to. Chapter 3, the first analytic Chapter, analyses political interviews with the former minister for Immigration and Citizenship of Australia, Kevin Andrews. Specifically, I examine how causal attributions function to build arguments that justify a reduction in the humanitarian quota for Sudanese refugees. This Chapter reformulates the traditional social-cognitive approach to causal attributions, and treats causality as a discursive resource: as a matter for speakers and hearers to orientate to and deploy for rhetorical purposes, functioning to attribute blame for ‘ntegration problems’ squarely on Sudanese refugees themselves. The close links between language, and its role in constructing justifications for punitive immigration policy, is well illustrated here. In Chapter 4, the second analytic Chapter, I examine how speakers on talkback radio orientate to what I have… Advisors/Committee Members: Augoustinos, Martha (advisor), School of Psychology (school).

Subjects/Keywords: social psychology; discursive psychology; prejudice; Sudanese refugees; talkback radio; racism; rhetoric

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hanson-Easey, S. (2011). Out of Africa : Sudanese refugees and the construction of difference in political and lay talk. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/72155

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hanson-Easey, Scott. “Out of Africa : Sudanese refugees and the construction of difference in political and lay talk.” 2011. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/72155.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hanson-Easey, Scott. “Out of Africa : Sudanese refugees and the construction of difference in political and lay talk.” 2011. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hanson-Easey S. Out of Africa : Sudanese refugees and the construction of difference in political and lay talk. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/72155.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hanson-Easey S. Out of Africa : Sudanese refugees and the construction of difference in political and lay talk. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/72155

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Technology, Sydney

2. Lei, Wei. Radio and social transformation in China.

Degree: 2015, University of Technology, Sydney

Since the arrival of television, radio has largely been an under-appreciated and understudied medium internationally. Radio in China is no exception. In comparison with Chinese television and the internet, ‘radio in China’ has been a poor cousin, invisible and largely unheard of in English-language scholarship. This thesis aims to fill this gaping hole by providing a systematic, comprehensive and critical study of radio in China. Focusing on the relationship between radio and social change in China in the decades of the economic reforms, the thesis investigates the role of radio in China’s profound social transformation. After a historical account of radio in the pre-reform period (including in both the Republic and Mao eras), the thesis traces the emergence of several new radio genres, formats and practices in the post-Mao decades. In particular, the genres of news, late night talkback, health infomercial and drive radio are critically examined with a view to identifying the key changes and continuities in the radio sector. The thesis identifies important ways in which radio at once derives from, embodies and contributes to China’s compressed transition from a socialist collective nation–state to a nation that, while still state-dominated, has moved a considerable distance towards becoming a privatised, globalised and individualised society.

Subjects/Keywords: Radio in China.; Role of radio.; China's social transformation.; New radio genres, formats and practices.; Genres of news.; Late night talkback.; Health infomercial.; Drive radio.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lei, W. (2015). Radio and social transformation in China. (Thesis). University of Technology, Sydney. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10453/43382

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lei, Wei. “Radio and social transformation in China.” 2015. Thesis, University of Technology, Sydney. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10453/43382.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lei, Wei. “Radio and social transformation in China.” 2015. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lei W. Radio and social transformation in China. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Technology, Sydney; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10453/43382.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lei W. Radio and social transformation in China. [Thesis]. University of Technology, Sydney; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10453/43382

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


AUT University

3. Sinton, Maureen. Putting the Public into Public Radio: Web 2.0 Interactivity and RNZ National .

Degree: AUT University

A new relationship paradigm is forming between public radio and its audience, due to the introduction of Web 2.0 technology that allows for the audience to interact easily with the broadcaster, from the platform of their choice. This paradigm contrasts with the traditional model of public broadcasting which provided the audience with a one-way media experience. New Zealand public service broadcaster RNZ National was used as a case study for this research project. Using grounded theory methodology the phenomenon of audience interactivity on public radio was studied from both sides of the microphone meaning that programme makers were interviewed and the contributions by listeners were analysed. Feedback content (comments contributed and read on-air) was recorded across most day-parts. News stories and interviews, as well as the comments of hosts and other listeners, acted as prompts, motivating the audience to engage with the broadcaster. Those topics with an emotional relevance to the audience attracted the most response. RNZ National staff responsible for the creation of content were surveyed for their views on the role of audience interactivity. All staff expressed the view that feedback is now an important component of the network's content. The number of comments broadcast indicates that Web 2.0's interactive technology has been readily adopted by the audience. The conversational tone of much feedback suggests that the audience perceive the host as a friend, and that their interactivity is a communication taking place within a relationship. By incorporating audience interactivity into its programme content, RNZ National has put the public into New Zealand public radio. Advisors/Committee Members: Hoar, Peter (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: public radio; public broadcasting; interactivity; talkback; Web 2.0; radio; New Zealand radio; RNZ National

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sinton, M. (n.d.). Putting the Public into Public Radio: Web 2.0 Interactivity and RNZ National . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10198

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sinton, Maureen. “Putting the Public into Public Radio: Web 2.0 Interactivity and RNZ National .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10198.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sinton, Maureen. “Putting the Public into Public Radio: Web 2.0 Interactivity and RNZ National .” Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Sinton M. Putting the Public into Public Radio: Web 2.0 Interactivity and RNZ National . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10198.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Sinton M. Putting the Public into Public Radio: Web 2.0 Interactivity and RNZ National . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10198

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.