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You searched for subject:(take over requests). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Delft University of Technology

1. Hu, Jimmy (author). Evaluating take-over requests with directional audio: Assessing the effect of ipsilateral and contralateral verbal stimuli on response times and visual behavior.

Degree: 2018, Delft University of Technology

Taking over control from an automated vehicle may take a substantial amount of time if the driver is not engaged in the driving task. Take-over requests containing directional information of hazardous surrounding cars could aid the driver in taking over the vehicle faster. However, whether the directional information should be presented ipsilaterally or contralaterally is still inconclusive. In this study, 34 participants were presented with animated video clips of traffic situations on a three-lane road, ending with a near-collision in front after 1,3, or 6 seconds. In each video, one lane was free to maneuver to safely. Participants were instructed to make a safe lane-change by pressing the left or right arrow key. At the start of each video, participants were provided with verbal auditory feedback: (1) ‘Go left/right’ (ipsilateral), (2) ‘Danger left/right’ (contralateral), and (3) Non-directional beeps as a baseline. 80% of the trials provided valid auditory feedback (i.e., relevant to the video situation). 20% of the trials provided invalid auditory feedback (i.e., feedback opposite to the video situation, so left instead of right and vice versa). Auditory feedback ‘Go/Danger left’ was always presented from the left speaker, and ‘Go/Danger right’ was always presented from the right speaker, whereas the non-directional beeps were presented from both speakers. Participants’ keyboard responses and first gazes were recorded in each trial. It was hypothesized that when there was 1-second to respond, ipsilateral feedback (‘Go’) would lead to fastest responses because little time is available to detect the hazard. For 3 and 6-second-to-respond situations, it was hypothesized that contralateral feedback (‘Danger’) would lead to a faster detection time of the hazard, because it facilitates visual detection. The results showed that for 1 and 3-second videos, ipsilateral feedback led to significantly faster responses compared to the baseline, and for 3 and 6-second videos contralateral feedback ‘Danger’ led to significantly faster responses compared to the baseline. ‘Go’ and ‘Danger’ did not yield a significant difference in response time between each other in all videos. First fixations seem to be placed on the most salient visual stimuli, independent of the audio feedback. In 1-second time-to-respond videos this was the center of the road (the location where the potential collision is happening. In 3-seconds, this was the hazard coming from the left or right lane. And for 6 seconds the first fixations were more distributed. In conclusion, verbal auditory feedback ‘Go’ and ‘Danger’ can aid in taking over a vehicle, by reducing the take-over response time compared to baseline warnings. However, this may not be the result of facilitation of the visual detection of the hazard, because visual behavior seems to be influenced mainly by visual stimuli, independent of auditory stimuli.

Biomechanical Design (BMD)

Advisors/Committee Members: de Winter, J.C.F. (mentor), Petermeijer, S.M. (mentor), Delft University of Technology (degree granting institution).

Subjects/Keywords: take-over requests; auditory; directional; ipsilateral; contralateral; HAD

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hu, J. (. (2018). Evaluating take-over requests with directional audio: Assessing the effect of ipsilateral and contralateral verbal stimuli on response times and visual behavior. (Masters Thesis). Delft University of Technology. Retrieved from http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:4aa0de3d-8522-4e77-ad30-66e9e00c1064

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hu, Jimmy (author). “Evaluating take-over requests with directional audio: Assessing the effect of ipsilateral and contralateral verbal stimuli on response times and visual behavior.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Delft University of Technology. Accessed April 12, 2021. http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:4aa0de3d-8522-4e77-ad30-66e9e00c1064.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hu, Jimmy (author). “Evaluating take-over requests with directional audio: Assessing the effect of ipsilateral and contralateral verbal stimuli on response times and visual behavior.” 2018. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hu J(. Evaluating take-over requests with directional audio: Assessing the effect of ipsilateral and contralateral verbal stimuli on response times and visual behavior. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:4aa0de3d-8522-4e77-ad30-66e9e00c1064.

Council of Science Editors:

Hu J(. Evaluating take-over requests with directional audio: Assessing the effect of ipsilateral and contralateral verbal stimuli on response times and visual behavior. [Masters Thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2018. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:4aa0de3d-8522-4e77-ad30-66e9e00c1064


Delft University of Technology

2. Athanasiadis, Omiros (author). A method to assess safety implications during authority transitions in automated driving.

Degree: 2020, Delft University of Technology

The question of how well in terms of safety can a driver take over control of an automated vehicle in response to an emergency situation is of crucial importance. Most of the studies performed so far focus on the drivers’ reaction times and the mechanisms behind the transition. In this study, an effort is made to incorporate the braking times that are required in order to finalize a safety maneuver, with the aim to assess the safety implications of the entire transition in control. For this purpose, a new methodology was developed and a simulation model was used in order to simulate platoons of CACC equipped vehicles. Two new KPIs were defined: the Time to Control and the Safe Time Budget. The results suggest that higher number of critical events and crashes are associated with higher market penetration rates. This reveals that despite the fact that AV can in general increase traffic efficiency and safety, when it comes to emergency situations where safety is inextricably linked to the combination of AV and driver performance, overall safety may be compromised under certain conditions. In addition, the results revealed a strong connection of the above-mentioned action times with the initial speed of the vehicles involved in a conflict. The findings of this research, point to new directions particularly in concern to the extension of the operational design domain of automated vehicles in order to minimize system deactivations, and also with regard to the need for better prediction models and safety assessment tools.

Transport, Infrastructure and Logistics

Advisors/Committee Members: van Arem, Bart (mentor), Papadimitriou, Eleonora (graduation committee), Calvert, Simeon (graduation committee), Klunder, Gerdien (graduation committee), Delft University of Technology (degree granting institution).

Subjects/Keywords: Authority transitions; CACC; Safety Assessment; driver behaviour; Simulation; AV; take-over requests

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Athanasiadis, O. (. (2020). A method to assess safety implications during authority transitions in automated driving. (Masters Thesis). Delft University of Technology. Retrieved from http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:02dc4999-7050-4cc2-9ac9-bced5e4cbf5f

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Athanasiadis, Omiros (author). “A method to assess safety implications during authority transitions in automated driving.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Delft University of Technology. Accessed April 12, 2021. http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:02dc4999-7050-4cc2-9ac9-bced5e4cbf5f.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Athanasiadis, Omiros (author). “A method to assess safety implications during authority transitions in automated driving.” 2020. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Athanasiadis O(. A method to assess safety implications during authority transitions in automated driving. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:02dc4999-7050-4cc2-9ac9-bced5e4cbf5f.

Council of Science Editors:

Athanasiadis O(. A method to assess safety implications during authority transitions in automated driving. [Masters Thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2020. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:02dc4999-7050-4cc2-9ac9-bced5e4cbf5f

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