Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(sulfanilamide). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Texas A&M University

1. Warren, Graham. Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2010, Texas A&M University

This work is mainly focused upon the preparation, processing and evaluation of mechanical and material properties of epoxy/single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanocomposite thin films. B-staged epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposite thin films at 50% of cure have been prepared for improving conductivity and mechanical performance of laminated composites. The SWCNTs were functionalized by oxidation and subsequent grafting using polyamidoamine generation 0 dendrimers (PAMAM-G0). The epoxy nanocomposites containing SWCNTs were successfully cast into thin films by manipulating degree of cure and viscosity of epoxy. The first section of this study focuses on the covalent oxidation and functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), which is necessary in order to obtain the full benefit of the SWCNTs inherent properties for reinforcement. In the second section of this work the preparation of B-staged epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposite thin films is discussed and what the purposes of thin films are. Additionally, the morphology as well as mechanical properties is evaluated by numerous means to obtain a clear picture as to the mechanisms of the epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposites. Furthermore, the effects of using sulfanilamide as a more attractive surface modifier for improved dispersion and adhesion and the effects of nylon particles for improved toughening on epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposites are discussed which displays improvements in numerous areas. Finally, based on these findings and previous studies, the B-staged epoxy/SWCNT nanocomposite thin films can be seamlessly integrated into laminated composite systems upon heating, and can serve as interleaves for improving conductivity and mechanical strengths of laminated fiber composite systems. Advisors/Committee Members: Sue, Hung-Jue (advisor), Boyd, Jim (committee member), Schwartz, Cris (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Epoxy; Carbon Nanotube; Nylon; Sulfanilamide; Toughening

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Warren, G. (2010). Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-05-332

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Warren, Graham. “Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-05-332.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Warren, Graham. “Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement.” 2010. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Warren G. Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-05-332.

Council of Science Editors:

Warren G. Epoxy/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Thin Films for Composites Reinforcement. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-05-332


Mississippi State University

2. Wilson, David L. Human carbonic anhydrase II: preparation, metal-substitution, activity, and inhibition.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2015, Mississippi State University

This report details the activities and inhibition of metal-substituted human carbonic anhydrase II (M-HCA-II). The traditional activities (hydrolysis of CO2 and <I>para</I>-nitrophenol acetate) in addition to new activities (oxidation of 2-aminophenol, disproportionation of H2O2, and disproportionation of superoxide) were investigated. Values reported for the relative hydrolytic activities of M-HCA-IIs are reported here for the first time, ranging from 47.5 % (plus or minus 0.6) to 86 % (plus or minus 4) for the hydrolysis of CO2 and from 0.299 % (plus or minus 0.012) to 4.72 % (plus or minus 0.015) for the hydrolysis of <I>para</I>-nitrophenol acetate. With respect to new activities, only the oxidation of 2-aminophenol was observed. Turnover was observed for Fe-HCA-II (kcat/KM = 3.6 plus or minus 1.3 mM-1 s-1) and Cu-HCA-II (kcat/KM = 8 plus or minus 2 mM-1 s-1). Inhibition of Zn-, (di-substituted) Cu2-, and Cu/Zn-HCA-II hydrolysis of CO2 and <I>para</I>-nitrophenol acetate by sulfanilamide, coumarin, and <I>ortho</I>-coumaric acid were investigated. Sulfanilamide was shown to inhibit: Zn-HCA-II, Cu2-HCA-II, and Cu/Zn-HCA-II - (with CO2) KM = 8.9 plus or minus 1.1 microM, 11 plus or minus 2 microM, 8.8 plus or minus 1.4 microM and (with p-nitrophenyl acetate) KM = 8.4 plus or minus 1.0 microM, (none), 8.4 plus or minus 1.4 microM, respectively. No inhibition was observed for coumarin or <I>ortho</I>-coumaric acid or its derivatives for any CAs studied. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph P. Emerson (chair), Edwin A. Lewis (committee member), Todd E. Mlsna (committee member), Nicholas C. Fitzkee (committee member), Debbie J. Beard (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: human carbonic anhydrase II; HCA-II; metal-substitution; copper; cobalt; manganese; iron; nickel; sulfanilamide; coumarin; kinetics; 2-aminophenol; catalase; superoxide dismutase; peroxidase

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, D. L. (2015). Human carbonic anhydrase II: preparation, metal-substitution, activity, and inhibition. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06222015-164959/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, David L. “Human carbonic anhydrase II: preparation, metal-substitution, activity, and inhibition.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06222015-164959/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, David L. “Human carbonic anhydrase II: preparation, metal-substitution, activity, and inhibition.” 2015. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Wilson DL. Human carbonic anhydrase II: preparation, metal-substitution, activity, and inhibition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06222015-164959/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson DL. Human carbonic anhydrase II: preparation, metal-substitution, activity, and inhibition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2015. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-06222015-164959/ ;

.