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You searched for subject:(successful course completion). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Central Florida

1. Garzia, Janet. A Study Of Elementary Student Course Completion And Achievement In Virtual And Traditional Format Courses Within The Volusia County School District.

Degree: 2013, University of Central Florida

The focus of this research study was to determine how elementary students enrolled in virtual education classes performed on state assessments and final report card grades in Reading and Mathematics as compared with students enrolled in traditional classes, and to examine whether there was a difference in the successful course completion rates between the two groups. Five research questions guided this study concerning the relationship of successful course completion, final grades, and FCAT 2.0 achievement level scores and the variables of virtual and traditional education in the School District of Volusia County. This study is significant, as the movement of virtual learning is driven by economic factors and learning outcomes need to be considered in making instructional delivery decisions. Chi-square analysis suggested no statistical significant difference existed in either Reading or Mathematics successful course completion of students in virtual and traditional settings. Chi-square analyses and a one-sample t-test suggested there was no statistical significant difference in performance of virtual and traditional students on FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics achievement levels. Although the Chi-square analyses showed no statistical significance in performance of virtual and traditional students on final report card grades in Reading and Mathematics, the one-sample t-tests suggested there was a statistically significant difference. When interpreting these results, caution should be taken as the virtual student population was extremely disproportionate to the traditional student population. Implications for practice and recommendations for future study are suggested in this study Advisors/Committee Members: Murray, Kenneth.

Subjects/Keywords: Virtual education; online learning; successful course completion; student achievement; Education; Educational Leadership; Dissertations, Academic  – Education, Education  – Dissertations, Academic

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garzia, J. (2013). A Study Of Elementary Student Course Completion And Achievement In Virtual And Traditional Format Courses Within The Volusia County School District. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Central Florida. Retrieved from https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/2630

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garzia, Janet. “A Study Of Elementary Student Course Completion And Achievement In Virtual And Traditional Format Courses Within The Volusia County School District.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Central Florida. Accessed July 19, 2019. https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/2630.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garzia, Janet. “A Study Of Elementary Student Course Completion And Achievement In Virtual And Traditional Format Courses Within The Volusia County School District.” 2013. Web. 19 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Garzia J. A Study Of Elementary Student Course Completion And Achievement In Virtual And Traditional Format Courses Within The Volusia County School District. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Central Florida; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 19]. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/2630.

Council of Science Editors:

Garzia J. A Study Of Elementary Student Course Completion And Achievement In Virtual And Traditional Format Courses Within The Volusia County School District. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Central Florida; 2013. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/2630


University of North Texas

2. Cervantez, Vera Ann. The Influence of Classroom Community and Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Community College Student Successful Course Completion in Online Courses.

Degree: 2011, University of North Texas

The relationships between community college students’ sense of community, student self-directed learning readiness, and successful completion of online courses were investigated using a correlational research design. Rovai’s Classroom Community Scale was used to measure classroom community, and the Fisher Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale was used to measure self-directed learning readiness, including three subscales of self-management, desire for learning, and self-control. The study participants were 205 students (49 males, 156 females; 131 White, 39 Black, 15 Asian, 10 Latino, 10 Multi-racial, 1 Native American) taking online courses during a summer term at a Texas community college. The research hypotheses were tested using Pearson r correlation coefficients between each of the seven independent variables (student learning, connectedness, classroom community, self-management, desire for learning, self-control, and self-directed learning readiness) and student successful course completion data. Contrary to prior study results, no association was found between students’ sense of community in online courses and student successful course completion. Although statistically significant differences were found between successful course completion and self-management (r = .258), desire for learning (r = .162), and self-directed learning readiness (r = .184), effect sizes were small suggesting a lack of practical significance. Possible reasons for the outcome of this study differing from prior research include relatively shorter semester length (summer term) during which data were collected and relatively smaller sample size. Advisors/Committee Members: Bower, Beverly, Whitson, Kathleen K., Bush, V. Barbara.

Subjects/Keywords: distance learning; successful course completion; classroom community; self-directedness; Educational technology.; Higher education.; self-directed learning; directed learning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cervantez, V. A. (2011). The Influence of Classroom Community and Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Community College Student Successful Course Completion in Online Courses. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84186/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cervantez, Vera Ann. “The Influence of Classroom Community and Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Community College Student Successful Course Completion in Online Courses.” 2011. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed July 19, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84186/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cervantez, Vera Ann. “The Influence of Classroom Community and Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Community College Student Successful Course Completion in Online Courses.” 2011. Web. 19 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Cervantez VA. The Influence of Classroom Community and Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Community College Student Successful Course Completion in Online Courses. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2011. [cited 2019 Jul 19]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84186/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cervantez VA. The Influence of Classroom Community and Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Community College Student Successful Course Completion in Online Courses. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2011. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc84186/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


AUT University

3. Singh, Kamakshi. Using predictive risk analysis to identify vulnerable first-year students at university: the importance of NCEA results .

Degree: AUT University

Much research has highlighted the factors leading to increasing dropouts among first-year undergraduates around the globe. This phenomenon is also an issue in New Zealand. Therefore, this research estimates the importance of various factors, derived from the administrative data provided by the Department of Strategy and Planning at AUT, on the probability of successful course completion at university. Non-completion of first-year courses may form the basis of future non-retention amongst undergraduate students. Efforts to avoid future substantial costs to the university and the government could prove beneficial by identifying factors that result in successful completion of courses as early as possible. This research focuses on first-year students who entered university using valid NCEA Level 3 scores. Majority of the universities in New Zealand, including AUT, have traditionally summarised NCEA results with a composite ‘rank’ score that arbitrarily assigns weights to Achieved, Merit and Excellence credits without any empirical study supporting the appropriateness of this weighting scheme. This study provides some empirical evidence on the validity of this weighting scheme by estimating the contributions of these different credits in predicting the successful completion of first-year courses. Results from our research also indicate that other factors (e.g., part-time study, gender and the degree programme) may play crucial roles in predicting successful course completion rates. Most importantly, we found that Merit and Excellence credits do not significantly differ in terms of predicting the probability of successful completion of courses. Therefore, we propose an alternative weighting scheme based on this empirical evidence that outperforms the existing NCEA rank score in predicting the successful completion of first-year courses at university. Advisors/Committee Members: Maloney, Tim (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Predictive risk analysis; Successful course completion; NCEA results

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Singh, K. (n.d.). Using predictive risk analysis to identify vulnerable first-year students at university: the importance of NCEA results . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/9280

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Singh, Kamakshi. “Using predictive risk analysis to identify vulnerable first-year students at university: the importance of NCEA results .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed July 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/9280.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Singh, Kamakshi. “Using predictive risk analysis to identify vulnerable first-year students at university: the importance of NCEA results .” Web. 19 Jul 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Singh K. Using predictive risk analysis to identify vulnerable first-year students at university: the importance of NCEA results . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2019 Jul 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/9280.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Singh K. Using predictive risk analysis to identify vulnerable first-year students at university: the importance of NCEA results . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/9280

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.