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You searched for subject:(student conceptualizations). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Cincinnati

1. Burns, Sharon L. Sophisticated Chaos: The Influence of Academic Discourse on Student Success in First-Year English Composition.

Degree: PhD, Education : Educational Studies, 2010, University of Cincinnati

Students' conceptualizations of academic writing are often based on their cultural and social expectations of what it means to be a student or an instructor in the academy. These expectations are as varied as any target population and continue to grow as multi-cultural heritages continue to expand. First-year student writers' performances are influenced by the academic discourses they are exposed to, based on the expectations they bring into the composition classroom. Few studies in English composition research have taken into account students' conceptualizations of academic writing based on their expectations, and in turn, the positive and negative influences of academic discourse on students' performances as novice writers. This study expanded the definition of discourse beyond language to mean a participatory tool that integrates social/cultural practices, identities, and behaviors. Using a qualitative approach, this dissertation examined the influence of academic discourse on student success in first-year English composition. This study moved away from the institutional definition of success as quantifiable achievement based on grades and defined success as a desire having intrinsic value when students feel that they have met their goals or objectives in a course. Data sources included classroom observations, student focus groups, and instructor interviews as a means of highlighting the gaps between students' native (private) discourse and academic (public) discourse and influencing factors that impede or promote students' success as they transition into the academy. A distinct decision was made to move away from textual analysis of student work as an analytical tool in an effort to allow participant voices to articulate how students access the academic discourse and any risks that might be associated with its use. Analyses were conducted in three phases using open coding, narrative analysis, and critical discourse analysis. Results demonstrated the influence of academic discourse on students' success in the composition classroom based on their performances as co-creators in the knowledge-building process. These students conceptualized academic writing as a skills-based activity, which provided insight into their limited understanding of academic discourse. Participants' social and cultural expectations of what it means to be student or instructor explained why students participated (or not) in a discourse that was not yet familiar, which directly influenced their success as first-year writers in English composition. Advisors/Committee Members: Camblin, Lanthan (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Rhetoric; academic discourse; English composition; literacy studies; discourse; student conceptualizations; academic writing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burns, S. L. (2010). Sophisticated Chaos: The Influence of Academic Discourse on Student Success in First-Year English Composition. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1275657274

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burns, Sharon L. “Sophisticated Chaos: The Influence of Academic Discourse on Student Success in First-Year English Composition.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cincinnati. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1275657274.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burns, Sharon L. “Sophisticated Chaos: The Influence of Academic Discourse on Student Success in First-Year English Composition.” 2010. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Burns SL. Sophisticated Chaos: The Influence of Academic Discourse on Student Success in First-Year English Composition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2010. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1275657274.

Council of Science Editors:

Burns SL. Sophisticated Chaos: The Influence of Academic Discourse on Student Success in First-Year English Composition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2010. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1275657274


University of Cincinnati

2. ARMSTRONG, SONYA L. BEGINNING THE LITERACY TRANSITION: POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS' CONCEPTUALIZATIONS OF ACADEMIC WRITING IN DEVELOPMENTAL LITERACY CONTEXTS.

Degree: EdD, Education : Literacy, 2007, University of Cincinnati

Most beginning college students experience some difficulty while trying to make the transition to the expectations of college-level writing. While much research has investigated the outcomes of this transition, not much research considers students' conceptual starting points. Also, very little writing research on this topic has been found that focuses exclusively on a growing population of first-year students—those enrolled in developmental college literacy courses. This dissertation outlines a study that was designed to generate knowledge about first-year college students' conceptualizations of academic writing and whether and how those conceptualizations changed over the course of their initial college literacy experience in a developmental reading and writing class. Data sources included sequenced semi-structured interviews, observations of classroom peer-group work, and participants' required course writing assignments. Data gathered from these sources included participants' elicited and spontaneously generated metaphors for and about academic writing. Data analysis included a non-metaphorical phase, which examined participants’ language through open coding without the lens of metaphor. Another phase of analysis focused exclusively on participants' metaphorical linguistic expressions and their implied conceptual metaphors. During the final phase of analysis, the results of the prior phases of data analysis were compared and synthesized in order to interpret conceptualizations based on participants' language. Analysis of these data confirmed conceptual diversity within the target population, as well as varying degrees of conceptual change during their introductory literacy coursework. The participants in this study demonstrated that they had personal models or theories of academic writing, of literacy, and of literacy-learning near the beginning of their reading and writing course. These participants' understandings of academic writing, and the degree to which these understandings evolved throughout the study, seemed to affect their perceived and actual development as writers in their reading and writing class. Advisors/Committee Members: Paulson, Dr. Eric (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Education, Higher; postsecondary developmental literacy; metaphor analysis; student conceptualizations; academic writing; developmental reading and writing courses; college students

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

ARMSTRONG, S. L. (2007). BEGINNING THE LITERACY TRANSITION: POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS' CONCEPTUALIZATIONS OF ACADEMIC WRITING IN DEVELOPMENTAL LITERACY CONTEXTS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1195948915

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

ARMSTRONG, SONYA L. “BEGINNING THE LITERACY TRANSITION: POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS' CONCEPTUALIZATIONS OF ACADEMIC WRITING IN DEVELOPMENTAL LITERACY CONTEXTS.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cincinnati. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1195948915.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

ARMSTRONG, SONYA L. “BEGINNING THE LITERACY TRANSITION: POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS' CONCEPTUALIZATIONS OF ACADEMIC WRITING IN DEVELOPMENTAL LITERACY CONTEXTS.” 2007. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

ARMSTRONG SL. BEGINNING THE LITERACY TRANSITION: POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS' CONCEPTUALIZATIONS OF ACADEMIC WRITING IN DEVELOPMENTAL LITERACY CONTEXTS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2007. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1195948915.

Council of Science Editors:

ARMSTRONG SL. BEGINNING THE LITERACY TRANSITION: POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS' CONCEPTUALIZATIONS OF ACADEMIC WRITING IN DEVELOPMENTAL LITERACY CONTEXTS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2007. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1195948915

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