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You searched for subject:(stress reactivity). Showing records 1 – 30 of 112 total matches.

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Leiden University

1. Swets, Irene. Stressrespons, zelfregulatie en agressief gedrag bij jonge kinderen.

Degree: 2014, Leiden University

 Physical aggression occurs already at age of twelve months and although most children learn to regulate their behavior, in some children the aggressive behavior exists… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: physical aggression; infant; stress reactivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Swets, I. (2014). Stressrespons, zelfregulatie en agressief gedrag bij jonge kinderen. (Masters Thesis). Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/28396

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swets, Irene. “Stressrespons, zelfregulatie en agressief gedrag bij jonge kinderen.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Leiden University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/28396.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swets, Irene. “Stressrespons, zelfregulatie en agressief gedrag bij jonge kinderen.” 2014. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Swets I. Stressrespons, zelfregulatie en agressief gedrag bij jonge kinderen. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Leiden University; 2014. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/28396.

Council of Science Editors:

Swets I. Stressrespons, zelfregulatie en agressief gedrag bij jonge kinderen. [Masters Thesis]. Leiden University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/28396


University of Utah

2. Birmingham, Wendy. Potential pathways through which social relationships mediate cardiovascular reactivity during stress.

Degree: MS;, Psychology;, 2009, University of Utah

 The quality and quantity of one's relationships have been reliably linked to morbidity and mortality. More recently, studies have focused on links between relationships and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Social relationships; Cardiovascular reactivity; Stress-buffering influences

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APA (6th Edition):

Birmingham, W. (2009). Potential pathways through which social relationships mediate cardiovascular reactivity during stress. (Masters Thesis). University of Utah. Retrieved from http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd2/id/729/rec/908

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Birmingham, Wendy. “Potential pathways through which social relationships mediate cardiovascular reactivity during stress.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Utah. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd2/id/729/rec/908.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Birmingham, Wendy. “Potential pathways through which social relationships mediate cardiovascular reactivity during stress.” 2009. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Birmingham W. Potential pathways through which social relationships mediate cardiovascular reactivity during stress. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Utah; 2009. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd2/id/729/rec/908.

Council of Science Editors:

Birmingham W. Potential pathways through which social relationships mediate cardiovascular reactivity during stress. [Masters Thesis]. University of Utah; 2009. Available from: http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd2/id/729/rec/908


Ohio University

3. Manigault, Andrew W. Mindfulness, Rumination, and Stress Recovery: Investigation of the Effects of Mindfulness on Rumination and Cortisol Responses following a Social-Evaluative Stressor.

Degree: MS, Experimental Psychology (Arts and Sciences), 2016, Ohio University

 Biological models of mindfulness suggest that mindfulness is able to affect a variety of health outcomes by reducing physiological stress reactivity (i.e., an increase or… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Stress; Reactivity; Recovery; Mindfulness; Rumination; Cortisol

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APA (6th Edition):

Manigault, A. W. (2016). Mindfulness, Rumination, and Stress Recovery: Investigation of the Effects of Mindfulness on Rumination and Cortisol Responses following a Social-Evaluative Stressor. (Masters Thesis). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1476375071253074

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Manigault, Andrew W. “Mindfulness, Rumination, and Stress Recovery: Investigation of the Effects of Mindfulness on Rumination and Cortisol Responses following a Social-Evaluative Stressor.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Ohio University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1476375071253074.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Manigault, Andrew W. “Mindfulness, Rumination, and Stress Recovery: Investigation of the Effects of Mindfulness on Rumination and Cortisol Responses following a Social-Evaluative Stressor.” 2016. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Manigault AW. Mindfulness, Rumination, and Stress Recovery: Investigation of the Effects of Mindfulness on Rumination and Cortisol Responses following a Social-Evaluative Stressor. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Ohio University; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1476375071253074.

Council of Science Editors:

Manigault AW. Mindfulness, Rumination, and Stress Recovery: Investigation of the Effects of Mindfulness on Rumination and Cortisol Responses following a Social-Evaluative Stressor. [Masters Thesis]. Ohio University; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1476375071253074


Virginia Tech

4. Swain, Deanna. The Moderating Role of Mindfulness on the Relationship between Parental Stress and Response to Child.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2015, Virginia Tech

 Increased stress levels due to parenting have been shown to correlate to harsher parenting responses towards children (Belsky, 1984). Mindfulness, however, suggests the ability to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: parent-child interaction; mindfulness; stress reactivity; parenting

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APA (6th Edition):

Swain, D. (2015). The Moderating Role of Mindfulness on the Relationship between Parental Stress and Response to Child. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/78082

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swain, Deanna. “The Moderating Role of Mindfulness on the Relationship between Parental Stress and Response to Child.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/78082.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swain, Deanna. “The Moderating Role of Mindfulness on the Relationship between Parental Stress and Response to Child.” 2015. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Swain D. The Moderating Role of Mindfulness on the Relationship between Parental Stress and Response to Child. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/78082.

Council of Science Editors:

Swain D. The Moderating Role of Mindfulness on the Relationship between Parental Stress and Response to Child. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/78082


Virginia Tech

5. Burns, Derek. Leader Development or Leader Distress? Examining the Interactive Effects of Leadership Self-Efficacy and Situational Strength on Perceptions of Stress, Performance, and Physiological Responses.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2018, Virginia Tech

Stress is a widely known concept that has been studied in various ways (individual perceptions, situational characteristics, physiology, etc.). However these approaches are often used… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: leadership; stress; physiological reactivity; situational strength

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APA (6th Edition):

Burns, D. (2018). Leader Development or Leader Distress? Examining the Interactive Effects of Leadership Self-Efficacy and Situational Strength on Perceptions of Stress, Performance, and Physiological Responses. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/84103

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burns, Derek. “Leader Development or Leader Distress? Examining the Interactive Effects of Leadership Self-Efficacy and Situational Strength on Perceptions of Stress, Performance, and Physiological Responses.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/84103.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burns, Derek. “Leader Development or Leader Distress? Examining the Interactive Effects of Leadership Self-Efficacy and Situational Strength on Perceptions of Stress, Performance, and Physiological Responses.” 2018. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Burns D. Leader Development or Leader Distress? Examining the Interactive Effects of Leadership Self-Efficacy and Situational Strength on Perceptions of Stress, Performance, and Physiological Responses. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/84103.

Council of Science Editors:

Burns D. Leader Development or Leader Distress? Examining the Interactive Effects of Leadership Self-Efficacy and Situational Strength on Perceptions of Stress, Performance, and Physiological Responses. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/84103


Oklahoma State University

6. Eddington, Angelica Radina. Examination Of Learned Helplessness, Cortisol, And Stress Reactivity In College Students With Asthma.

Degree: Department of Psychology, 2009, Oklahoma State University

 The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to examine aspects of a learned helplessness induction task and salivary cortisol in college students with… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: asthma; college students; learned helplessness; stress reactivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Eddington, A. R. (2009). Examination Of Learned Helplessness, Cortisol, And Stress Reactivity In College Students With Asthma. (Thesis). Oklahoma State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/9414

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eddington, Angelica Radina. “Examination Of Learned Helplessness, Cortisol, And Stress Reactivity In College Students With Asthma.” 2009. Thesis, Oklahoma State University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/9414.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eddington, Angelica Radina. “Examination Of Learned Helplessness, Cortisol, And Stress Reactivity In College Students With Asthma.” 2009. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Eddington AR. Examination Of Learned Helplessness, Cortisol, And Stress Reactivity In College Students With Asthma. [Internet] [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2009. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/9414.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Eddington AR. Examination Of Learned Helplessness, Cortisol, And Stress Reactivity In College Students With Asthma. [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/9414

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Minnesota

7. Gavian, Margaret E. The effects of relaxation and gratitude interventions on stress outcomes.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2011, University of Minnesota

 Research suggests that positive emotions play an important role in mental and physical health outcomes including combating the effects of stress. Research has also shown… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Gratitude; Progressive muscle relaxation; Stress reactivity; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Gavian, M. E. (2011). The effects of relaxation and gratitude interventions on stress outcomes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/117368

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gavian, Margaret E. “The effects of relaxation and gratitude interventions on stress outcomes.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Minnesota. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://purl.umn.edu/117368.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gavian, Margaret E. “The effects of relaxation and gratitude interventions on stress outcomes.” 2011. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Gavian ME. The effects of relaxation and gratitude interventions on stress outcomes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/117368.

Council of Science Editors:

Gavian ME. The effects of relaxation and gratitude interventions on stress outcomes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2011. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/117368


Brigham Young University

8. Brown, Brodrick Thomas. The Relationship Between Experiential Avoidance and Physiological Reactivity.

Degree: MS, 2018, Brigham Young University

 Due to the universal nature of stress, and its impact on physical health, it is important to understand how it is related to other psychological… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: experiential avoidance; acceptance; stress; cardiovascular reactivity; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Brown, B. T. (2018). The Relationship Between Experiential Avoidance and Physiological Reactivity. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7982&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Brodrick Thomas. “The Relationship Between Experiential Avoidance and Physiological Reactivity.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7982&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Brodrick Thomas. “The Relationship Between Experiential Avoidance and Physiological Reactivity.” 2018. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Brown BT. The Relationship Between Experiential Avoidance and Physiological Reactivity. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7982&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown BT. The Relationship Between Experiential Avoidance and Physiological Reactivity. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2018. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=7982&context=etd


University of Minnesota

9. Johnson, Anna. Cognitive-Affective Strategies and Early Adversity as Modulators of Psychosocial Stress Reactivity in Children and Adolescents.

Degree: PhD, Child Psychology, 2013, University of Minnesota

 The transition to adolescence is a key period in the reshaping of systems central to emotion and stress, including maturation of neural networks involved in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Adolescence; Coping; Early life stress; Emotion regulation; Stress reactivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, A. (2013). Cognitive-Affective Strategies and Early Adversity as Modulators of Psychosocial Stress Reactivity in Children and Adolescents. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11299/175534

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Anna. “Cognitive-Affective Strategies and Early Adversity as Modulators of Psychosocial Stress Reactivity in Children and Adolescents.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Minnesota. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11299/175534.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Anna. “Cognitive-Affective Strategies and Early Adversity as Modulators of Psychosocial Stress Reactivity in Children and Adolescents.” 2013. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Johnson A. Cognitive-Affective Strategies and Early Adversity as Modulators of Psychosocial Stress Reactivity in Children and Adolescents. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/175534.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson A. Cognitive-Affective Strategies and Early Adversity as Modulators of Psychosocial Stress Reactivity in Children and Adolescents. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/175534


Brigham Young University

10. Jones, Dustin LaMar. Mindfulness Meditation: Effects of a Brief Intervention on Cardiovascular Reactivity during Acute Stress.

Degree: MS, 2013, Brigham Young University

  Mindfulness has historically been cultivated via formal meditation practice and the majority of meditation research examines individuals with extensive training or participants in Mindfulness… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: mindfulness meditation; stress reduction; cardiovascular reactivity; blood pressure; stress; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Jones, D. L. (2013). Mindfulness Meditation: Effects of a Brief Intervention on Cardiovascular Reactivity during Acute Stress. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5157&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Dustin LaMar. “Mindfulness Meditation: Effects of a Brief Intervention on Cardiovascular Reactivity during Acute Stress.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5157&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Dustin LaMar. “Mindfulness Meditation: Effects of a Brief Intervention on Cardiovascular Reactivity during Acute Stress.” 2013. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Jones DL. Mindfulness Meditation: Effects of a Brief Intervention on Cardiovascular Reactivity during Acute Stress. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5157&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Jones DL. Mindfulness Meditation: Effects of a Brief Intervention on Cardiovascular Reactivity during Acute Stress. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2013. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5157&context=etd


Ohio University

11. Rochette, Lynne M. Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity to Stress between Friends, Acquaintances, and Strangers.

Degree: PhD, Psychology (Arts and Sciences), 2010, Ohio University

 The purpose of this study was to assess the association between gender and closeness of the support provider on cardiovascular reactivity to acute stress. Volunteers… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Health; Physiological Psychology; Social Psychology; Social Support; Friendship; Psychological Stress; Health Psychology; Relationships; Cardiovascular Reactivity; Stress-Reactivity; Coping; Gender; Closeness

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APA (6th Edition):

Rochette, L. M. (2010). Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity to Stress between Friends, Acquaintances, and Strangers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1273595052

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rochette, Lynne M. “Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity to Stress between Friends, Acquaintances, and Strangers.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Ohio University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1273595052.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rochette, Lynne M. “Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity to Stress between Friends, Acquaintances, and Strangers.” 2010. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Rochette LM. Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity to Stress between Friends, Acquaintances, and Strangers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Ohio University; 2010. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1273595052.

Council of Science Editors:

Rochette LM. Gender Differences in Cardiovascular Reactivity to Stress between Friends, Acquaintances, and Strangers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Ohio University; 2010. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1273595052


University of Georgia

12. Rooks, Cherie Renee. Effects of acute and chronic exercise on cardiovascular responses in female smokers.

Degree: PhD, Exercise Science, 2009, University of Georgia

 Among women, smoking is the leading cause of preventable death and disease. Endothelial dysfunction, measured by flow mediated dilation (FMD) and hyper-reactivity to neurovascular challenges… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Endothelial function; Exercise; Flow mediated dilation; Physical activity; Stress reactivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Rooks, C. R. (2009). Effects of acute and chronic exercise on cardiovascular responses in female smokers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rooks_cherie_r_200912_phd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rooks, Cherie Renee. “Effects of acute and chronic exercise on cardiovascular responses in female smokers.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rooks_cherie_r_200912_phd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rooks, Cherie Renee. “Effects of acute and chronic exercise on cardiovascular responses in female smokers.” 2009. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Rooks CR. Effects of acute and chronic exercise on cardiovascular responses in female smokers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2009. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rooks_cherie_r_200912_phd.

Council of Science Editors:

Rooks CR. Effects of acute and chronic exercise on cardiovascular responses in female smokers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Georgia; 2009. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rooks_cherie_r_200912_phd


Temple University

13. Hamilton, Jessica Leigh. Physiological Markers of Stress Generation and Affect Reactivity in Depression.

Degree: PhD, 2017, Temple University

Psychology

Although existing research has evaluated physiological and environmental risk factors for depression, these processes are often examined in isolation without considering the dynamic relationships… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Physiological psychology;

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APA (6th Edition):

Hamilton, J. L. (2017). Physiological Markers of Stress Generation and Affect Reactivity in Depression. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,460183

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hamilton, Jessica Leigh. “Physiological Markers of Stress Generation and Affect Reactivity in Depression.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,460183.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hamilton, Jessica Leigh. “Physiological Markers of Stress Generation and Affect Reactivity in Depression.” 2017. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Hamilton JL. Physiological Markers of Stress Generation and Affect Reactivity in Depression. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,460183.

Council of Science Editors:

Hamilton JL. Physiological Markers of Stress Generation and Affect Reactivity in Depression. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2017. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,460183


University of Utah

14. Carlisle, McKenzie. Effects of explicit and implicit friendship attitudes on appraisals and cardiovascular reactivity during a negative event discussion.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2013, University of Utah

 Decades of research provides evidence that social relationships are powerful predictors of health and mortality. One important moderator of the link between relationships and health… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cardiovascular reactivity; Friendship; Implicit attitudes; Social cognition; Social support; Stress

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APA (6th Edition):

Carlisle, M. (2013). Effects of explicit and implicit friendship attitudes on appraisals and cardiovascular reactivity during a negative event discussion. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Utah. Retrieved from http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd3/id/2518/rec/819

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carlisle, McKenzie. “Effects of explicit and implicit friendship attitudes on appraisals and cardiovascular reactivity during a negative event discussion.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Utah. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd3/id/2518/rec/819.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carlisle, McKenzie. “Effects of explicit and implicit friendship attitudes on appraisals and cardiovascular reactivity during a negative event discussion.” 2013. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Carlisle M. Effects of explicit and implicit friendship attitudes on appraisals and cardiovascular reactivity during a negative event discussion. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Utah; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd3/id/2518/rec/819.

Council of Science Editors:

Carlisle M. Effects of explicit and implicit friendship attitudes on appraisals and cardiovascular reactivity during a negative event discussion. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Utah; 2013. Available from: http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd3/id/2518/rec/819

15. Malcolm, Lydia R. Cardiovascular Reactivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression.

Degree: 2015, Nova Southeastern University

 Exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity (CVR) to stress has been implicated in the increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cardiovascular; Depression; Impedance Cardiography; Posttraumatic Stress; psychophysiology; Reactivity; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Malcolm, L. R. (2015). Cardiovascular Reactivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression. (Thesis). Nova Southeastern University. Retrieved from http://nsuworks.nova.edu/cps_stuetd/89

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Malcolm, Lydia R. “Cardiovascular Reactivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression.” 2015. Thesis, Nova Southeastern University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://nsuworks.nova.edu/cps_stuetd/89.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Malcolm, Lydia R. “Cardiovascular Reactivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression.” 2015. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Malcolm LR. Cardiovascular Reactivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression. [Internet] [Thesis]. Nova Southeastern University; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://nsuworks.nova.edu/cps_stuetd/89.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Malcolm LR. Cardiovascular Reactivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression. [Thesis]. Nova Southeastern University; 2015. Available from: http://nsuworks.nova.edu/cps_stuetd/89

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia State University

16. Ward, Andrew M. The Relationship Between Religiosity and Religious Coping to Stress Reactivity and Psychological Well-Being.

Degree: PhD, Counseling and Psychological Services, 2010, Georgia State University

 A significant body of research has identified the deleterious effects of stress on psychological well-being (e.g., Tataro, Luecken, & Gunn, 2004). Religiosity and religious coping… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: religiosity; religious coping; cortisol; stress reactivity; Student Counseling and Personnel Services

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APA (6th Edition):

Ward, A. M. (2010). The Relationship Between Religiosity and Religious Coping to Stress Reactivity and Psychological Well-Being. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cps_diss/50

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ward, Andrew M. “The Relationship Between Religiosity and Religious Coping to Stress Reactivity and Psychological Well-Being.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cps_diss/50.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ward, Andrew M. “The Relationship Between Religiosity and Religious Coping to Stress Reactivity and Psychological Well-Being.” 2010. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Ward AM. The Relationship Between Religiosity and Religious Coping to Stress Reactivity and Psychological Well-Being. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cps_diss/50.

Council of Science Editors:

Ward AM. The Relationship Between Religiosity and Religious Coping to Stress Reactivity and Psychological Well-Being. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2010. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/cps_diss/50


National University of Ireland – Galway

17. Lee, Eimear M. Socially relevant personality traits and attenuated cardiovascular functioning .

Degree: 2013, National University of Ireland – Galway

 Introduction. Previous research has implicated certain personality traits in the aetiology of cardiovascular disease. One common theme in such research is that traits that impinge… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cardiovascular reactivity; Personality; Stress and health; Psychophysiology; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Lee, E. M. (2013). Socially relevant personality traits and attenuated cardiovascular functioning . (Thesis). National University of Ireland – Galway. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3816

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Eimear M. “Socially relevant personality traits and attenuated cardiovascular functioning .” 2013. Thesis, National University of Ireland – Galway. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3816.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Eimear M. “Socially relevant personality traits and attenuated cardiovascular functioning .” 2013. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Lee EM. Socially relevant personality traits and attenuated cardiovascular functioning . [Internet] [Thesis]. National University of Ireland – Galway; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3816.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lee EM. Socially relevant personality traits and attenuated cardiovascular functioning . [Thesis]. National University of Ireland – Galway; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10379/3816

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Bowling Green State University

18. Northern, Jebediah J. The Development, Evaluation and Validation of a Novel Measure of Financial Stress.

Degree: MA, Psychology/Clinical, 2007, Bowling Green State University

 Financial Stress has been associated with adverse health consequences. Yet, no validated measures exist. Two studies were conducted to produce a valid financial stress scale.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology, Physiological; Financial Stress; Cardiovascular Reactivity; Health; Measurement

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APA (6th Edition):

Northern, J. J. (2007). The Development, Evaluation and Validation of a Novel Measure of Financial Stress. (Masters Thesis). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1192572217

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Northern, Jebediah J. “The Development, Evaluation and Validation of a Novel Measure of Financial Stress.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1192572217.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Northern, Jebediah J. “The Development, Evaluation and Validation of a Novel Measure of Financial Stress.” 2007. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Northern JJ. The Development, Evaluation and Validation of a Novel Measure of Financial Stress. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1192572217.

Council of Science Editors:

Northern JJ. The Development, Evaluation and Validation of a Novel Measure of Financial Stress. [Masters Thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2007. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1192572217


Ohio University

19. Borchardt, Amy R. The Effects of Social Support and Speech Anxiety on Cardiovascular Reactivity to Acute Stress.

Degree: MS, Psychology (Arts and Sciences), 2008, Ohio University

 To further understanding of social support-health links, the current study examined the interacting effects of speech anxiety and thoughts of social support on cardiovascular reactivity(more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Social support; Cardiovascular reactivity; Acute stress; Speech anxiety

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APA (6th Edition):

Borchardt, A. R. (2008). The Effects of Social Support and Speech Anxiety on Cardiovascular Reactivity to Acute Stress. (Masters Thesis). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1212607514

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Borchardt, Amy R. “The Effects of Social Support and Speech Anxiety on Cardiovascular Reactivity to Acute Stress.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Ohio University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1212607514.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Borchardt, Amy R. “The Effects of Social Support and Speech Anxiety on Cardiovascular Reactivity to Acute Stress.” 2008. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Borchardt AR. The Effects of Social Support and Speech Anxiety on Cardiovascular Reactivity to Acute Stress. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Ohio University; 2008. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1212607514.

Council of Science Editors:

Borchardt AR. The Effects of Social Support and Speech Anxiety on Cardiovascular Reactivity to Acute Stress. [Masters Thesis]. Ohio University; 2008. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1212607514


Penn State University

20. Katz, Deirdre Ann. Adolescent stress reactivity and recovery: Examining the relationships between emotion regulation and the stress response with a school-based group public speaking task.

Degree: PhD, Human Development and Family Studies, 2016, Penn State University

 This dissertation examines the associations between physiological responses to stress and emotion regulation strategies in a group of adolescents. The primary aim of this study… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cortisol; Emotion Regulation; Adolescence; Rumination; salivary biomarkers; Stress reactivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Katz, D. A. (2016). Adolescent stress reactivity and recovery: Examining the relationships between emotion regulation and the stress response with a school-based group public speaking task. (Doctoral Dissertation). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28731

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Katz, Deirdre Ann. “Adolescent stress reactivity and recovery: Examining the relationships between emotion regulation and the stress response with a school-based group public speaking task.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Penn State University. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28731.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Katz, Deirdre Ann. “Adolescent stress reactivity and recovery: Examining the relationships between emotion regulation and the stress response with a school-based group public speaking task.” 2016. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Katz DA. Adolescent stress reactivity and recovery: Examining the relationships between emotion regulation and the stress response with a school-based group public speaking task. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Penn State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28731.

Council of Science Editors:

Katz DA. Adolescent stress reactivity and recovery: Examining the relationships between emotion regulation and the stress response with a school-based group public speaking task. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Penn State University; 2016. Available from: https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/28731

21. Garcia, Esmeralda. Acculturation, Mood, and Infant Stress Reactivity in Mexican-American Mother-Infant Pairs .

Degree: 2015, California State University – San Marcos

 The present study examined the association between maternal acculturative processes, postnatal depression symptoms, and infant cortisol response to an acute stressor in a sample of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: acculturative processes; maternal postnatal depression; infant stress reactivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Garcia, E. (2015). Acculturation, Mood, and Infant Stress Reactivity in Mexican-American Mother-Infant Pairs . (Thesis). California State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/139608

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garcia, Esmeralda. “Acculturation, Mood, and Infant Stress Reactivity in Mexican-American Mother-Infant Pairs .” 2015. Thesis, California State University – San Marcos. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/139608.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garcia, Esmeralda. “Acculturation, Mood, and Infant Stress Reactivity in Mexican-American Mother-Infant Pairs .” 2015. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Garcia E. Acculturation, Mood, and Infant Stress Reactivity in Mexican-American Mother-Infant Pairs . [Internet] [Thesis]. California State University – San Marcos; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/139608.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Garcia E. Acculturation, Mood, and Infant Stress Reactivity in Mexican-American Mother-Infant Pairs . [Thesis]. California State University – San Marcos; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/139608

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Western Ontario

22. Daoust, Andrew R. Examining Child Sex as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Cortisol Reactivity and Symptoms Over Time.

Degree: 2018, University of Western Ontario

 Females’ reactivity to stress appears to be closely tied to internalizing symptoms, while males who are under-reactive may be at risk for externalizing problems. Little… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cortisol; HPA axis; stress reactivity; psychopathology; children; sex differences; Child Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Daoust, A. R. (2018). Examining Child Sex as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Cortisol Reactivity and Symptoms Over Time. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5541

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Daoust, Andrew R. “Examining Child Sex as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Cortisol Reactivity and Symptoms Over Time.” 2018. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5541.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Daoust, Andrew R. “Examining Child Sex as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Cortisol Reactivity and Symptoms Over Time.” 2018. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Daoust AR. Examining Child Sex as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Cortisol Reactivity and Symptoms Over Time. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5541.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Daoust AR. Examining Child Sex as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Cortisol Reactivity and Symptoms Over Time. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2018. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5541

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Washington University in St. Louis

23. Delawalla, Zainab. Stress reactivity, stress appraisal and coping responses in schizophrenia.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2010, Washington University in St. Louis

 Psychosocial factors have long been recognized as important to the etiology of schizophrenia. According to the stress-vulnerability model, the experience of stress is critical to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology, Clinical; coping, cortisol, Schizophrenia, social support, stress reactivity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Delawalla, Z. (2010). Stress reactivity, stress appraisal and coping responses in schizophrenia. (Doctoral Dissertation). Washington University in St. Louis. Retrieved from https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/etd/84

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Delawalla, Zainab. “Stress reactivity, stress appraisal and coping responses in schizophrenia.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Washington University in St. Louis. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/etd/84.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Delawalla, Zainab. “Stress reactivity, stress appraisal and coping responses in schizophrenia.” 2010. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Delawalla Z. Stress reactivity, stress appraisal and coping responses in schizophrenia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Washington University in St. Louis; 2010. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/etd/84.

Council of Science Editors:

Delawalla Z. Stress reactivity, stress appraisal and coping responses in schizophrenia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Washington University in St. Louis; 2010. Available from: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/etd/84


Laurentian University

24. Calderwood, Mallory. The effects of perfectionism on decisional delay under conditions of perceived risk .

Degree: 2017, Laurentian University

 The present study sought to explore and expand the knowledge regarding the fairly novel body of literature looking at perfectionism and the decision-making process called… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: perfectionism; decision-making; decisional delay; stress reactivity; selection difficulty

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APA (6th Edition):

Calderwood, M. (2017). The effects of perfectionism on decisional delay under conditions of perceived risk . (Thesis). Laurentian University. Retrieved from https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/2757

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Calderwood, Mallory. “The effects of perfectionism on decisional delay under conditions of perceived risk .” 2017. Thesis, Laurentian University. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/2757.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Calderwood, Mallory. “The effects of perfectionism on decisional delay under conditions of perceived risk .” 2017. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Calderwood M. The effects of perfectionism on decisional delay under conditions of perceived risk . [Internet] [Thesis]. Laurentian University; 2017. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/2757.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Calderwood M. The effects of perfectionism on decisional delay under conditions of perceived risk . [Thesis]. Laurentian University; 2017. Available from: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/2757

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Ottawa

25. Foot, Meredith L. Emotion Regulation and Stress Reactivity in the Adolescent Daughters of Depressed Mothers .

Degree: 2011, University of Ottawa

 The daughters of women with a history of depression are at heightened risk for a range of mental health problems. The present study investigated emotion… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: maternal depression; depression; adolescents; cortisol; emotion regulation; interpersonal competence; stress reactivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Foot, M. L. (2011). Emotion Regulation and Stress Reactivity in the Adolescent Daughters of Depressed Mothers . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/19944

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Foot, Meredith L. “Emotion Regulation and Stress Reactivity in the Adolescent Daughters of Depressed Mothers .” 2011. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/19944.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Foot, Meredith L. “Emotion Regulation and Stress Reactivity in the Adolescent Daughters of Depressed Mothers .” 2011. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Foot ML. Emotion Regulation and Stress Reactivity in the Adolescent Daughters of Depressed Mothers . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/19944.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Foot ML. Emotion Regulation and Stress Reactivity in the Adolescent Daughters of Depressed Mothers . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/19944

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


North Carolina State University

26. Ennis, Gilda Edwards. Physiological Stress Responses Associated with a Cognitive Challenge: Individual Differences and Relationship to Memory.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2009, North Carolina State University

 Previous research has suggested that middle-aged and older educated adults have increased cortisol reactivity to cognitive challenge compared to younger educated participants and less educated… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: education; personality; declarative memory; working memory; stress; age; physiological reactivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Ennis, G. E. (2009). Physiological Stress Responses Associated with a Cognitive Challenge: Individual Differences and Relationship to Memory. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/459

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ennis, Gilda Edwards. “Physiological Stress Responses Associated with a Cognitive Challenge: Individual Differences and Relationship to Memory.” 2009. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/459.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ennis, Gilda Edwards. “Physiological Stress Responses Associated with a Cognitive Challenge: Individual Differences and Relationship to Memory.” 2009. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Ennis GE. Physiological Stress Responses Associated with a Cognitive Challenge: Individual Differences and Relationship to Memory. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2009. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/459.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ennis GE. Physiological Stress Responses Associated with a Cognitive Challenge: Individual Differences and Relationship to Memory. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2009. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/459

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Southern California

27. Singh, Kulwinder. Role of central adiposity and chronic stress as risks for exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stressors.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2011, University of Southern California

 Chronic stress and central adiposity are independently associated with negative cardiovascular health outcomes. Additionally, both characteristics are associated with exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity, a risk factor… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cardiovascular reactivity; central obesity; chronic stress; impedance cardiography; blunting

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APA (6th Edition):

Singh, K. (2011). Role of central adiposity and chronic stress as risks for exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stressors. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/655760/rec/5627

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Singh, Kulwinder. “Role of central adiposity and chronic stress as risks for exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stressors.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/655760/rec/5627.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Singh, Kulwinder. “Role of central adiposity and chronic stress as risks for exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stressors.” 2011. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Singh K. Role of central adiposity and chronic stress as risks for exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stressors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/655760/rec/5627.

Council of Science Editors:

Singh K. Role of central adiposity and chronic stress as risks for exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stressors. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2011. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/655760/rec/5627


University of Southern California

28. Xiao, Rong. Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months.

Degree: PhD, Social Work, 2013, University of Southern California

 Background: Stress plays an important role in the etiology, progress, and prognosis of schizophrenia. Understanding how stress responsivity influences the functional outcomes among people with… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: skin conductance level; stress reactivity; emotional perception; psychiatric symptoms; role functioning

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APA (6th Edition):

Xiao, R. (2013). Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/298904/rec/6391

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Xiao, Rong. “Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/298904/rec/6391.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Xiao, Rong. “Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months.” 2013. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Xiao R. Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/298904/rec/6391.

Council of Science Editors:

Xiao R. Testing biopsychosocial models integrating electrodermal activity, neurocognition, and social cognition to predict the functional outcomes among people with schizophrenia at three time points over 12 months. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/298904/rec/6391

29. Mehta, Sanjay. The Association of Cognitive Function with Autonomic-Cardiovascular Reactivity to and Recovery From Stress.

Degree: Doctor of Psychology (PsyD), Psychology, 2012, Old Dominion University

  The contribution of stress in the development of chronic and terminal disease has garnered significant interest in contemporary research. The current study aims to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cardiovascular reactivity; Cardiovascular recovery; Cognitive function; Stress; Biological Psychology; Clinical Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Mehta, S. (2012). The Association of Cognitive Function with Autonomic-Cardiovascular Reactivity to and Recovery From Stress. (Thesis). Old Dominion University. Retrieved from 9781267425522 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/211

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mehta, Sanjay. “The Association of Cognitive Function with Autonomic-Cardiovascular Reactivity to and Recovery From Stress.” 2012. Thesis, Old Dominion University. Accessed September 18, 2019. 9781267425522 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/211.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mehta, Sanjay. “The Association of Cognitive Function with Autonomic-Cardiovascular Reactivity to and Recovery From Stress.” 2012. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Mehta S. The Association of Cognitive Function with Autonomic-Cardiovascular Reactivity to and Recovery From Stress. [Internet] [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: 9781267425522 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/211.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mehta S. The Association of Cognitive Function with Autonomic-Cardiovascular Reactivity to and Recovery From Stress. [Thesis]. Old Dominion University; 2012. Available from: 9781267425522 ; https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/psychology_etds/211

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas State University – San Marcos

30. Brooks, Wendy L. The Role of Physical Environment in Stress Reactivity.

Degree: MA, Health Psychology, 2011, Texas State University – San Marcos

 This study examined the role of the physical environment (restorative v. non-restorative) in physiological and psychological reactivity to a cognitive stressor and investigated the potential… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Stress reactivity; Health; Hostility; Architectural environment; Ambient environment; Interior design

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APA (6th Edition):

Brooks, W. L. (2011). The Role of Physical Environment in Stress Reactivity. (Masters Thesis). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2505

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brooks, Wendy L. “The Role of Physical Environment in Stress Reactivity.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2505.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brooks, Wendy L. “The Role of Physical Environment in Stress Reactivity.” 2011. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Brooks WL. The Role of Physical Environment in Stress Reactivity. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2505.

Council of Science Editors:

Brooks WL. The Role of Physical Environment in Stress Reactivity. [Masters Thesis]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2011. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2505

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