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University of Adelaide

1. Pisaniello, Sandra Louise. Emotion labour, emotion work and occupational strain in nurses.

Degree: 2010, University of Adelaide

Concerns about the psychological health of South Australian hospital nurses have been raised on account of nursing shortages, retention difficulties, and the associated resource constraints on the existing pool of nursing staff. According to workers compensation statistics, the nursing profession is prominent with respect to occupational stress claims, resulting in substantial costs for both the individuals and organisations concerned. This thesis addresses the question of if, and how, emotion labour and emotion work influence job stress and strain and job satisfaction in nurses. In a first study, 238 nurses (35 males) employed at a large public hospital completed a questionnaire comprising predictive measures addressing individual factors, workload and work environment, and outcome measures focussing on health, job strain and satisfaction, impressions of organisational commitment and intention to leave. The relationships of emotion labour and emotion work with the outcomes were assessed with regard to demographics, individual differences, workload and work environment factors. The association of emotion labour performance with individual differences, workload and work environment factors, as well as health and organisational outcomes, differed from that of emotion work. Performance of emotion labour associated more strongly with negative health outcomes when compared with emotion work performance, and can be likened to a demand, whereas emotion work performance, particularly in the form of companionship, was associated with a reduction in negative affect, and can be likened to a resource for nurses. To extend these findings, a second study explored similar variables, as well as autonomy, in 176 nurses (8 males) working at private hospitals. The questionnaire package used in the first study was refined and vignettes were included in order to further explore the emotion labour and work concepts via qualitative analysis. In general, the findings from this study were consistent with those from the first study. However, emotion work in the form of companionship was negatively related to patient-related burnout once emotion work performance was restricted to the workplace. The factor structure of emotional exhaustion, measured by the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory was also confirmed. As a final element of the research, the views and perspectives about occupational strain and its management and prevention, from eight work-based consultants (Employee Assistance Providers) were investigated using a structured interview format. This led to a greater understanding of how their knowledge of occupational stress in nursing staff might be applied in the refinement of management policies, as well as what individual, team and organisational interventions are currently used for managing occupational stress in hospital nurses. The research demonstrates the importance of emotion variables in the prediction of job well being and satisfaction. The Conservation of Resources Theory, along with the UK Health and Safety Executive Stress… Advisors/Committee Members: Winefield, Helen Russell (advisor), Delfabbro, Paul Howard (advisor), School of Psychology (school).

Subjects/Keywords: occupational health; organisational psychology; emotion labour; emotion work; nurses; health care; occupational stress; occupational strain; burnout; job satisfaction; work-family interference; social support; hospital setting; employee assistance provider

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pisaniello, S. L. (2010). Emotion labour, emotion work and occupational strain in nurses. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/62333

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pisaniello, Sandra Louise. “Emotion labour, emotion work and occupational strain in nurses.” 2010. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/62333.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pisaniello, Sandra Louise. “Emotion labour, emotion work and occupational strain in nurses.” 2010. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Pisaniello SL. Emotion labour, emotion work and occupational strain in nurses. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/62333.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pisaniello SL. Emotion labour, emotion work and occupational strain in nurses. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/62333

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Muralidharan, Nitin. Mechano-Electrochemistry for Advanced Energy Storage and Harvesting Devices.

Degree: PhD, Interdisciplinary Materials Science, 2018, Vanderbilt University

A fundamental perception in the energy storage community is that mechanical processes accompanying electrochemical processes are an unavoidable by-product. However, the coupling between mechanics and electrochemistry termed as the âmechano-electrochemical couplingâ is a powerful yet unexplored tool. Using principles of elastic strain engineering, we demonstrate controllable modulation of electrochemical parameters governing energy storage systems. Leveraging the shape memory properties of NiTi alloys, redox potentials and diffusion coefficient modulations for energy storage materials were achieved as a function of applied strain. Building off these principles, we developed electrochemical-mechanical energy harvesters for harnessing ambient mechanical energy at very low frequencies (<5 Hz), a regime where the conventional state-of the art piezoelectric and triboelectric energy harvesters have drastically reduced performances. We also highlight frequency tuning capabilities in this class of energy harvesters owing to the inherent differences in various battery electrode chemistries for use in human motion harvesting and sensing applications and multifunctional transient energy harvesting and storage devices. Additionally, to further illustrate the relationship between mechanical and electrochemical properties, we developed multifunctional structural supercapacitor and battery composites for use in load-bearing applications. Overall, these approaches provide paradigm shifting fundamental insights as well as create a framework for developing such multifunctional energy storage/harvesting architectures for a multitude of applications. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Cary Pint (chair), Dr. Douglas Adams (chair), Dr. Greg Walker (committee member), Dr. Rizia Bardhan (committee member), Dr. Leon Bellan (committee member), Dr. Piran Kidambi (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: electrochemical mechanical coupling; energy harvesting; in-situ; strain; stress; mechanical processes; elastic strain engineering; strain setting; substrate strains; shapememory alloy; superelastic; multifunctional energy storage; transient energy harvesters; transient energy storage; pseudocapacitors; supercapacitors; load-bearing; structural; human motion harvesting; modulating electrochemistry; mechano-electrochemistry; advanced energy storage; advanced energy harvesting; low frequency energy harvesting; ambient energy harvesting; electrochemical-mechanical energy harvesting; Nitinol; battery mechanics; strain engineering; energy storage

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Muralidharan, N. (2018). Mechano-Electrochemistry for Advanced Energy Storage and Harvesting Devices. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06142018-084514/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Muralidharan, Nitin. “Mechano-Electrochemistry for Advanced Energy Storage and Harvesting Devices.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06142018-084514/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Muralidharan, Nitin. “Mechano-Electrochemistry for Advanced Energy Storage and Harvesting Devices.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Muralidharan N. Mechano-Electrochemistry for Advanced Energy Storage and Harvesting Devices. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06142018-084514/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Muralidharan N. Mechano-Electrochemistry for Advanced Energy Storage and Harvesting Devices. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2018. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06142018-084514/ ;

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