Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(stimulant use disorder). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of North Texas

1. Pennington, Cody W. The Academic Steroid: Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants at a North Texas University.

Degree: 2014, University of North Texas

The goal of this study was to determine the extent, motivations, and justifications of nonmedical prescription stimulant use among the population at a large public university in the North Texas region. Participants consisted of 526 undergraduate students enrolled at the studied university during the spring and summer 2014 semesters. The findings of the study suggest that the nonmedical use by students was higher than the findings in much of the current literature, but was within the parameters established in the literature. The primary motivation for nonmedical use was academic in nature and was justified by moderation of nonmedical use to strategic academic times. Advisors/Committee Members: Belshaw, Scott Howard, Coleman, Eric, McGuinness, Maureen.

Subjects/Keywords: Nonmedical stimulant use; students; Attention deficit disorder; drug use; Stimulants  – Texas.; College students  – Drug use  – Texas.; Medication abuse  – Texas.

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pennington, C. W. (2014). The Academic Steroid: Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants at a North Texas University. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699893/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pennington, Cody W. “The Academic Steroid: Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants at a North Texas University.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699893/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pennington, Cody W. “The Academic Steroid: Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants at a North Texas University.” 2014. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Pennington CW. The Academic Steroid: Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants at a North Texas University. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699893/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pennington CW. The Academic Steroid: Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants at a North Texas University. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2014. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc699893/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Johnson, Amy. The Pharmacology of an Agonist Medication to Treat Stimulant Use Disorder.

Degree: PhD, Pharmacology & Toxicology, 2017, Virginia Commonwealth University

Cocaine use disorder is a serious public health issue for which no approved pharmacotherapies exist. The development of a pharmacotherapy for cocaine use disorder is a priority for the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Amphetamine maintenance has been shown to be effective to reduce cocaine use in double-blind placebo controlled clinical trials, but has not been approved due to concerns over safety and abuse liability. Development of new pharmacotherapies is facilitated by preclinical testing for effectiveness and identification of new targets for medication development. The first part of this dissertation develops a novel non-human primate cocaine self-administration choice procedure that is modeled after a human laboratory cocaine self-administration choice procedure to improve translational research and facilitate medication development. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to examining the mechanisms of amphetamine maintenance-induced decreases in cocaine use. In the novel non-human primate choice procedure, monkeys chose between injections of cocaine or food pellets (0, 1, 3 or 10) in a 9-choice discrete trials procedure. The reinforcers were available on concurrent independent progressive-ratio schedules. Monkeys chose between cocaine and food in a dose- and magnitude-dependent manner. Maintenance on 7 days of lisdexamfetamine and amphetamine decreased cocaine choices without decreasing food responding, providing evidence that this model may be able to predict drugs that will have clinical efficacy to decrease cocaine use. The next set of experiments examined the effects of amphetamine maintenance on the abuse-related behavioral (intracranial self-stimulation, ICSS) and neurochemical [nucleus accumbens dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT)] effects of cocaine, methylenedioxypyrovalerone, and methamphetamine in rats. Amphetamine maintenance produced sustained increases in ICSS baseline responding and nucleus accumbens DA levels without affecting 5-HT levels. Amphetamine maintenance also attenuated the behavioral and neurochemical abuse-related effects of cocaine but not those of methamphetamine, and with MDPV, amphetamine maintenance decreased the abuse-related neurochemical effect of MDPV, but not the abuse-related behavioral effect. This suggests that amphetamine would likely be most effective against cocaine, least effective against methamphetamine and between the two for MDPV. These data suggest targets that selectively release DA will be the most effective against cocaine use disorder. Advisors/Committee Members: S. Stevens Negus.

Subjects/Keywords: cocaine; amphetamine; pharmacotherapy; stimulant use disorder

…ABSTRACT THE PHARMACOLOGY OF AN AGONIST MEDICATION TO TREAT STIMULANT USE DISORDER Amy R… …Cocaine use disorder is a serious public health issue for which no approved pharmacotherapies… …exist. The development of a pharmacotherapy for cocaine use disorder is a priority for the… …will be the most effective against cocaine use disorder. Chapter I Introduction… …cocaine use disorder within the past year (SAMSHA, 2017). In the same survey… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, A. (2017). The Pharmacology of an Agonist Medication to Treat Stimulant Use Disorder. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/5177

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Amy. “The Pharmacology of an Agonist Medication to Treat Stimulant Use Disorder.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed January 22, 2020. https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/5177.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Amy. “The Pharmacology of an Agonist Medication to Treat Stimulant Use Disorder.” 2017. Web. 22 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Johnson A. The Pharmacology of an Agonist Medication to Treat Stimulant Use Disorder. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 22]. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/5177.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson A. The Pharmacology of an Agonist Medication to Treat Stimulant Use Disorder. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/5177

.