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You searched for subject:(steady planing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Savander, Brant Raymond. Planing hull steady hydrodynamics.

Degree: PhD, Ocean engineering, 1997, University of Michigan

The goal of the research performed in this thesis is to develop a tool based on rational mechanics that will provide insight into the flow physics that govern the steady planing of a vessel, and to provide the planing vessel designer with an engineering tool for predicting planing hull lift and drag. The hydrodynamics associated with planing hulls remains a challenging theoretical problem due primarily to the existence of a spray jet at the hull-free surface intersection. Large pressure gradients are experienced in this region due to large flow accelerations associated with the presence of the jet. The large flow accelerations are primarily restricted to the transverse plane. This transverse nature of the flow suggests that the large gradients can be captured approximately in a two dimensional model. Vorus (1996) has developed a free surface impact theory to be used with slender body theory (SBT) to predict steady planing hydrodynamics. The model developed in this thesis is generated by first formulating the three dimensional (3D) boundary value problem, and then adding and subtracting the slender body theory (SBT) formulation. The difference between 3D and SBT represents the three dimensional correction to the slender body solution. The Vorus (1996) model is extended to allow for incorporation of these additional terms. Since the large gradients are captured in the impact model which is used with SBT, the resulting correction terms are generally well behaved functions that allow for numerical iteration to the convergent solution of the three dimensional problem. Purely computational techniques, such as panel methods, have trouble capturing planing hydrodynamics due to the extremely challenging non-linear physics associated with the spray jet and the fact that the hull wetted surface is not known in advance. This problem becomes further complicated when non-prismatic hull geometry is introduced. The three dimensional iterative approach presented in this work allows for resolution of the spray jet details and determination of the wetted surface for general hull shapes within the context of the solution procedure. A comparative study is carried out illustrating the influence that varying hull geometry has on lift and drag. Numerical results from both the 3D and SBT models are compared with experimental force and pressure data. Advisors/Committee Members: Vorus, William S. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Hull; Hydrodynamics; Planing; Slender Body Theory; Steady

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APA (6th Edition):

Savander, B. R. (1997). Planing hull steady hydrodynamics. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130352

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Savander, Brant Raymond. “Planing hull steady hydrodynamics.” 1997. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130352.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Savander, Brant Raymond. “Planing hull steady hydrodynamics.” 1997. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Savander BR. Planing hull steady hydrodynamics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1997. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130352.

Council of Science Editors:

Savander BR. Planing hull steady hydrodynamics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1997. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130352


University of Michigan

2. Xu, Lixin. A theory for asymmetrical vessel impact and steady planing.

Degree: PhD, Ocean engineering, 1998, University of Michigan

This thesis proposes a two-dimensional theory for asymmetric impact of hard chine vessel sections with arbitrary geometry. Interaction between two asymmetric body sides is incorporated into the hydrodynamic impact model. Two types of flow models are established for cases of small and large asymmetry; the distinguishing difference being whether the flow attaches or separates at the keel on the first instances of impact. The method of vortex distributions is applied for modeling these nonlinear boundary value problems. Solutions are carried out through a time-marching procedure with free-vortex shedding (jet-spraying). Initial conditions are derived from basic solutions for straight-side contours, e.g., wedges, with constant impact velocity. The proposed method provides transient sectional slamming loads (including dynamic pressure distributions, lifting forces and restoring moments), as well as jet formation dynamics. Computational results are presented for various sectional contours with constant or variable impact velocity. The model is applicable for asymmetrical planing analysis of slender bodies, and applied in the prediction of the dynamic wetted surface during steady prismatic planing, with zero or non-zero heel angle. The present theory is also used to solve for the dynamic response of a vessel during free-fall impact. For asymmetric cases, the vessel's resultant motions are coupled by the vertical penetration and self-righting rolling. Experimental verifications demonstrate generally good agreement with the present theoretical simulations. Advisors/Committee Members: Troesch, Armin W. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Asymmetrical; Jet Formation; Planing; Slamming Loads; Steady; Theory; Vessel Impact

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APA (6th Edition):

Xu, L. (1998). A theory for asymmetrical vessel impact and steady planing. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/131357

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Xu, Lixin. “A theory for asymmetrical vessel impact and steady planing.” 1998. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/131357.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Xu, Lixin. “A theory for asymmetrical vessel impact and steady planing.” 1998. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Xu L. A theory for asymmetrical vessel impact and steady planing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1998. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/131357.

Council of Science Editors:

Xu L. A theory for asymmetrical vessel impact and steady planing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1998. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/131357


University of New Orleans

3. Zhou, Zhengquan. A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water.

Degree: PhD, Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, 2003, University of New Orleans

A planing catamaran is a high-powered, twin-hull water craft that develops the lift which supports its weight, primarily through hydrodynamic water pressure. Presently, there is increasing demand to further develop the catamaran's planing and seakeeping characteristics so that it is more effectively applied in today's modern military and pleasure craft, and offshore industry supply vessels. Over the course of the past ten years, Vorus (1994,1996,1998,2000) has systematically conducted a series of research works on planing craft hydrodynamics. Based on Vorus' planing monohull theory, he has developed and implemented a first order nonlinear model for planing catamarans, embodied in the computer code CatSea. This model is currently applied in planing catamaran design. However, due to the greater complexity of the catamaran flow physics relative to the monohull, Vorus's (first order) catamaran model implemented some important approximations and simplifications which were not considered necessary in the monohull work. The research of this thesis is for relieving the initially implemented approximations in Vorus's first order planing catamaran theory, and further developing and extending the theory and application beyond that currently in use in CatSea. This has been achieved through a detailed theoretical analysis, algorithm development, and careful coding. The research result is a new, complete second order nonlinear hydrodynamic theory for planing catamarans. A detailed numerical comparison of the Vorus's first order nonlinear theory and the second order nonlinear theory developed here is carried out. The second order nonlinear theory and algorithms have been incorporated into a new catamaran design code (NewCat). A detailed mathematical formulation of the base first order CatSea theory, followed by the extended second order theory, is completely documented in this thesis. Advisors/Committee Members: Vorus, William, Wei, Dongming, Falzarano, Jeffrey.

Subjects/Keywords: vortex strength distribution; random wave; nonlinear wave; high speed jet flow; water jet; fast ship; vessel design; drag and resistance dynamic lift; high speed craft; Planing craft; planing boat; impact hydrodynamics; steady planing; seakeeping; slender body theory; time marching; singular integral; special function; ship motion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhou, Z. (2003). A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Orleans. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/28

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhou, Zhengquan. “A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Orleans. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/28.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhou, Zhengquan. “A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water.” 2003. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Zhou Z. A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Orleans; 2003. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/28.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhou Z. A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Orleans; 2003. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/28

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