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You searched for subject:(sprint swimming). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Lutula, Antonio. Resisted Sprint Training in Swimming : A Quasi-Experimental Study on Swedish National Level Swimmers.

Degree: Sport and Health Sciences, 2019, Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences

Aim The aim of this study was to ascertain the effect of resisted sprint training in swimming on maximal swimming velocity and performance characteristics. The aim was also to examine how maximal swimming velocity is related to maximal swim power and maximal dry-land power. Method Eighteen competitive national level swimmers (9 male and 9 female; age: 18.3 ± 2.3 years, body mass: 72 ± 8.3 kg, height: 177.2 ± 4.6 cm, mean ± SD) were recruited to this study. Subjects were assigned to either resisted sprint training (RST) or unresisted sprint training (UST). Sprint training was performed two times per week during 6 weeks as 8x15m with a 2min send-off interval. RST performed sprint training using individualized load corresponding 10% of maximum drag load (L10), UST performed sprint training with no added resistance. A test-battery including dry-land strength assessment; maximal strength (MxS) and explosive strength (ExS), a timed 25m front-crawl swim and in-water force-velocity profiling was performed prior and following the training intervention. Maximal swim power (Pmax), maximum drag load (F0), theoretical maximum velocity (v0) and slope of force-velocity curve (SFv) was computed though force-velocity profiling. Results No significant within group differences occurred in neither RST nor UST following the 6-week intervention period in: swimming velocity, MxS, ExS, Pmax, F0, v0, and SFv. Strong correlations were found between swimming velocity and MxS (r = 0.75), ExS (r =0.82) and Pmax (r = 0.92). Conclusion Resisted sprint training in swimming using L10 did in the present study not elicit any improvements in maximal swimming velocity or examined performance characteristics. Resisted sprint training does not appear to be a superior method of improving swimming performance compared to unresisted sprint training. MxS, ExS and Pmax can be used as robust predictors of swim performance, however only Pmax was found to be casually related to swimming velocity.

Subjects/Keywords: swimming; sprint swimming; resisted sprint training; resisted swimming; anaerobic power; swim power; swim bench; 1080 sprint; 1080 motion; force velocity; biomechanics; Sport and Fitness Sciences; Idrottsvetenskap

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lutula, A. (2019). Resisted Sprint Training in Swimming : A Quasi-Experimental Study on Swedish National Level Swimmers. (Thesis). Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5860

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lutula, Antonio. “Resisted Sprint Training in Swimming : A Quasi-Experimental Study on Swedish National Level Swimmers.” 2019. Thesis, Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5860.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lutula, Antonio. “Resisted Sprint Training in Swimming : A Quasi-Experimental Study on Swedish National Level Swimmers.” 2019. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Lutula A. Resisted Sprint Training in Swimming : A Quasi-Experimental Study on Swedish National Level Swimmers. [Internet] [Thesis]. Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5860.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lutula A. Resisted Sprint Training in Swimming : A Quasi-Experimental Study on Swedish National Level Swimmers. [Thesis]. Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences; 2019. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5860

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Indiana University

2. White, Joshua Childs. Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming .

Degree: 2010, Indiana University

Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, a new method, the Max Power Model, for assessing resistive (Fres) and propulsive (Fprop) forces using tethered swimming was developed. The Max Power Model (MPM) is based on the maximum power that a swimmer can deliver to an external load while swimming (Pmax) and its relationship with the maximum velocity of the swimmer (vmax). The development of the MPM was accomplished in three ways: examination of the shape of the Pmax vs. vmax curve, development of a method of comparing Pmax vs. vmax curves, and finally testing the sensitivity of the method to large changes using the four competitive strokes and underwater dolphin kicking. Second, the validity of the MPM was assessed by comparison with the Velocity Perturbation Model (VPM) and response to independent changes in Fres and Fprop during swimming (as supplied by a pocketed dragsuit, a wetsuit, hand paddles, fist gloves). Results: The MPM was developed effectively. The Pmax vs. vmax curve was found to be best described as an exponential function. Comparisons of Pmax vs. vmax curves were therefore made after linearization using the natural log of Pmax. If the slopes were similar, the comparisons were accomplished using ANCOVA with vmax as the covariate, otherwise a t-test for differences in slope was used. The MPM was sensitive to large changes in the swimming condition as seen through significant differences (p < 60; 0.05) in an ANCOVA for competitive stroke and a significantly different slope of ln(Pmax) vs. vmax for underwater dolphin kick in comparison with the competitive strokes. Assessment of the validity of the MPM yielded mixed results. The MPM showed a strong relationship to the VPM. However, the VPM showed no significant differences between any of the equipment treatment conditions in either the calculated Fres or the drag coefficient indicating an inability to detect small changes in Fres and Fprop. The MPM showed more promise, responding as expected to a majority of the equipment conditions. Conclusion: While still in need of further exploration and validation, the MPM has promise as a simple method to detect, separate, and quantify differences in Fres and Fprop during swimming. Advisors/Committee Members: Stager, Joel M (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sprint Swimming; Tethered Swimming; Active Drag; Swimming Propulsion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

White, J. C. (2010). Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming . (Thesis). Indiana University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2022/7706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

White, Joshua Childs. “Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming .” 2010. Thesis, Indiana University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2022/7706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

White, Joshua Childs. “Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming .” 2010. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

White JC. Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming . [Internet] [Thesis]. Indiana University; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/7706.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

White JC. Development and Validity Assessment of the Max Power Model for the Detection, Separation, and Quantification of Differences in Resistive and Propulsive Forces in Swimming . [Thesis]. Indiana University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/7706

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.