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You searched for subject:(spiritual competency). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Mississippi State University

1. Selby, Anna Marsh. Perceived spiritual competency of Masters-level clinical mental health students enrolled in CACREP accredited counselor education programs: An investigation of variables.

Degree: PhD, Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Foundations, 2018, Mississippi State University

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship among strength of religious faith, a set of demographic variables, and self-perceived spiritual competence of masters-level clinical mental health counseling students enrolled in CACREP accredited programs. The study methodology was a quantitative correlational survey research design using multiple linear regression analysis. Data were collected from 178 participants through an online survey comprised of three instruments: the Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Scale (Plante & Boccaccini, 1997), and the Revised Spiritual Competency Scale (Dailey, Robertson, & Gill, 2015), and a demographic survey developed by the researcher. Results of the multiple linear regression revealed that 30% of the total variance in scores on the SCS-R-II was predicted by the model. In terms of individual relationships between the independent variables and scores on the Spiritual Competency Scale, strength of religious faith (p < .001), sexual orientation (p = .027), and awareness of the ASERVIC Spiritual Competencies (p = .034) each were statistically significant predictors of higher scores on the SCS-R-II. The remaining seven predictor variables age, gender, ethnicity (2), university affiliation, exposure to SRIC in program, and hours completed in program were not found to be statistically significant predictors of scores on the SCS-R-II. Advisors/Committee Members: Cheryl A. Justice (committee member), Katherine Dooley (chair), David Morse (committee member), Kimberly Renee Hall (committee member), Deborah Jackson (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: spiritual competency; spirituality; counselor education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Selby, A. M. (2018). Perceived spiritual competency of Masters-level clinical mental health students enrolled in CACREP accredited counselor education programs: An investigation of variables. (Doctoral Dissertation). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03232018-104415/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Selby, Anna Marsh. “Perceived spiritual competency of Masters-level clinical mental health students enrolled in CACREP accredited counselor education programs: An investigation of variables.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Mississippi State University. Accessed August 25, 2019. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03232018-104415/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Selby, Anna Marsh. “Perceived spiritual competency of Masters-level clinical mental health students enrolled in CACREP accredited counselor education programs: An investigation of variables.” 2018. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Selby AM. Perceived spiritual competency of Masters-level clinical mental health students enrolled in CACREP accredited counselor education programs: An investigation of variables. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03232018-104415/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Selby AM. Perceived spiritual competency of Masters-level clinical mental health students enrolled in CACREP accredited counselor education programs: An investigation of variables. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Mississippi State University; 2018. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-03232018-104415/ ;


University of Central Florida

2. Robertson, Linda. The Spiritual Competency Scale: A Comparison To The Aservic Spiritual Competencies.

Degree: 2008, University of Central Florida

Spiritual and religious beliefs are significant aspects of a person's worldview and have been well established within many disciplines as a resource for physical and mental health. Therefore, they are relevant topics for counselors. The governing bodies of the counseling profession support the discussion of these beliefs in counseling. To meet the ethical mandates for competency in this area, the Association for Spiritual, Ethical, and Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC) produced the Spiritual Competencies. Despite these efforts, spiritual and religious material continues to be neglected in counselor training programs. In the absence of a formal measure of spiritual competency, curricular recommendations have been based more on speculation about what should be taught than on empirical evidence of students' deficits in spiritual competency. A further concern is that there is no existing measure to empirically evaluate the efficacy of this type of training. The purpose of this study was to meet these needs through the development of the Spiritual Competency Scale (SCS). The pilot instrument was administered to 100 participants at a southeastern secular university. The final study included 602 participants from 25 secular and religiously-based universities in 17 states across the nation. All participants were master's level students who were enrolled in mental health, community, school, marriage and family, and pastoral counseling tracks. The items were drawn from the literature and address each of ASERVIC's nine Spiritual Competencies. Content validity was establishing through item-competency consensus by an expert panel. A 6 factor oblique model was extracted through exploratory factor analysis and an item analysis supported the revised instrument. The pilot instrument yielded favorable test-retest reliability (i.e., .903) and internal consistency coefficients (i.e., .932). Cronbach's alpha for the 28-item revised instrument (i.e., .896) and for each of the resultant factors (i.e., from .720 to .828) was also satisfactory. There was no evidence of socially desirable response sets in either administration. The discriminant validity of the SCS was supported by this finding and through a contrasted groups approach. Students from religiously-based schools had significantly higher scores than their secular counterparts. There were also differences in scores based on a variety of demographic variables. The findings of this study support the use of the SCS to inform curriculum development, as a measure of training outcomes, and as a tool for the certification of spiritually competent counselors. Recommendations are made for future analysis of the psychometric properties of the SCS and the limitations of the study are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Young, Mark.

Subjects/Keywords: spirituality; religion; counselor education; ASERVIC; Spiritual Competency Scale; factor analysis; Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Robertson, L. (2008). The Spiritual Competency Scale: A Comparison To The Aservic Spiritual Competencies. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Central Florida. Retrieved from https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/3549

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robertson, Linda. “The Spiritual Competency Scale: A Comparison To The Aservic Spiritual Competencies.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Central Florida. Accessed August 25, 2019. https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/3549.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robertson, Linda. “The Spiritual Competency Scale: A Comparison To The Aservic Spiritual Competencies.” 2008. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Robertson L. The Spiritual Competency Scale: A Comparison To The Aservic Spiritual Competencies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Central Florida; 2008. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/3549.

Council of Science Editors:

Robertson L. The Spiritual Competency Scale: A Comparison To The Aservic Spiritual Competencies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Central Florida; 2008. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/3549


University of Waikato

3. Pevreal, Jennifer Christine. The Science of Meditation: From Mysticism to Mainstream Western Psychology .

Degree: 2012, University of Waikato

Psychological applications of meditative practice have become the ‘third-wave’ tools in the psychology clinician’s therapeutic tool kit. Meditation techniques for numerous psychological disorders, as well as the psychological impacts of chronic medical conditions, are being used by a growing number of mainstream clinicians in Western healthcare contexts, which were previously the domain of alternative practitioners, and formerly the sometimes secretive and mysterious domain of the orthodox and esoteric spiritual traditions. Many questions arise regarding how this conversion has taken place and why. This thesis explores some of the issues surrounding the adoption, reduction, and application of meditation practices from the Eastern and Western origins and transmission to mainstream Western healthcare contexts. By tracing the history of the rise in popularity of meditation in the mainstream Western health sciences, particularly within the mental health sector over the past century or so, it is intended to contribute to an answer to, in part, the question of ‘why’ and, in part, the question of ‘how’. A further question of whether sufficient cognizance has been taken of the subjective experiences and understandings of long-term meditation practitioners and what they can contribute to Western psychological understanding of meditation—its application potentials and pitfalls—is explored. Why is this important? At present, being intelligent, and highly trained, as most clinicians have come to believe they are, it has become somewhat taken for granted that reading journal articles or books on meditation, and attending a workshop or two, perhaps even a week-long residential training retreat, qualifies one to begin using meditation processes with clients. However, is clinician training and competency in the use of meditation currently sufficient to ensure its safe and appropriate use, particularly for psychologically impaired clients, given the phenomena reported by long-term meditators and the judicious preparatory processes required by teachers in the wisdom traditions of origin? Using qualitative methodology and a social constructionist viewing lens, I elucidate whether Western psychology’s reductive approach may create barriers to the growth of a knowledge-field of the potential of meditation for personal and collective development and wellbeing—which has existed since antiquity, but which current psychological interest indicates is by no means antiquated. Twenty three semi-guided indepth interviews were conducted with 18 long-term meditators from diverse backgrounds and nationalities, to explore their subjective experiences—the phenomena they encountered and the meanings they ascribed to their meditation practices. What became apparent through the course of this research was the divergence that exists between the positivist Western scientific literature on meditation and the experiences and understandings of this sample of meditators. The implications that arise from a paradigm clash between the… Advisors/Committee Members: Thakker, Jo (advisor), Macdonald, Judith (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: clinical psychology; meditation; mental health; healthcare; mainstream; mysticism; mantra; third-wave; prayer; Eastern; Western; training and competency; paradigm clash; mindfulness; consciousness; wisdom traditions; spiritual traditions; esoteric; energy-transference; initiation; scientific materialism; positivism; qualitative

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pevreal, J. C. (2012). The Science of Meditation: From Mysticism to Mainstream Western Psychology . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/7737

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pevreal, Jennifer Christine. “The Science of Meditation: From Mysticism to Mainstream Western Psychology .” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed August 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/7737.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pevreal, Jennifer Christine. “The Science of Meditation: From Mysticism to Mainstream Western Psychology .” 2012. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Pevreal JC. The Science of Meditation: From Mysticism to Mainstream Western Psychology . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2012. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/7737.

Council of Science Editors:

Pevreal JC. The Science of Meditation: From Mysticism to Mainstream Western Psychology . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/7737

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