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You searched for subject:(sphingobium chlorophenolicum). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Colorado

1. Rokicki, Joe Franklin. Regulatory Organization and Transcriptional Response of Sphingobium Chlorophenolicum to the Anthropogenic Pesticide Petachlorophenol.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Colorado

The sudden and widespread introduction of the pesticide pentachlorophenol (PCP) into the environment from 1930 to 1980 created a new global selection pressure on microbes. The subsequent isolation of a pentachlorophenol degrading bacterium, Sphingobium chlorophenolicum, provided a unique opportunity to study an early evolutionary response to the new selective pressure. The minimal enzymatic pathway required to degrade PCP was laboriously determined before high throughput sequencing was possible. Many of the proteins discovered were identified by following their activities through increasingly stringent fractionations, sequencing the N terminus of the protein, designing degenerate primers, and ultimately cloning the gene from the genome. This highly targeted approach proved to be effective but left many of the evolutionary questions that motivated the study of this pathway and this organism unanswered. Where did these genes come from? Did they originate from horizontal gene transfer, duplication and divergence, or recruitment? What are the regulatory mechanisms of this pathway? Are other genes induced by PCP? To answer these questions, a global perspective of the genome and transcriptome of the organism is required. In this thesis, I ascertain and discuss the complete genome sequence of S. chlorophenolicum, I discuss the development of a bioinformatics tool to facilitate massively comparative microbial genomics, I uncover and examine the global transcriptional response of S. chlorophenolicum to PCP, and I take a detailed molecular look at the key transcription factors governing this regulatory response. Advisors/Committee Members: Robin D. Dowell, Corrie Detweiler, Tin Tin Su, Dylan Taatjes, Norman Pace.

Subjects/Keywords: Evolution; LysR Type Regulators; sphingobium chlorophenolicum; transcriptional regulators; CodaChrome; genome modifications; Environmental Microbiology and Microbial Ecology; Genomics; Molecular Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rokicki, J. F. (2015). Regulatory Organization and Transcriptional Response of Sphingobium Chlorophenolicum to the Anthropogenic Pesticide Petachlorophenol. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/mcdb_gradetds/40

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rokicki, Joe Franklin. “Regulatory Organization and Transcriptional Response of Sphingobium Chlorophenolicum to the Anthropogenic Pesticide Petachlorophenol.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed March 30, 2020. https://scholar.colorado.edu/mcdb_gradetds/40.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rokicki, Joe Franklin. “Regulatory Organization and Transcriptional Response of Sphingobium Chlorophenolicum to the Anthropogenic Pesticide Petachlorophenol.” 2015. Web. 30 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Rokicki JF. Regulatory Organization and Transcriptional Response of Sphingobium Chlorophenolicum to the Anthropogenic Pesticide Petachlorophenol. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2015. [cited 2020 Mar 30]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/mcdb_gradetds/40.

Council of Science Editors:

Rokicki JF. Regulatory Organization and Transcriptional Response of Sphingobium Chlorophenolicum to the Anthropogenic Pesticide Petachlorophenol. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2015. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/mcdb_gradetds/40


Texas A&M University

2. Diaz Casas, Adriana Z. Bioremediation of the organophosphate methyl parathion using genetically engineered and native organisms.

Degree: 2005, Texas A&M University

Toxic waste disposal problems have become enormous due to the proliferation of xenobiotic compounds for use in agricultural, industrial and numerous other applications. Organophosphate (OP) pesticides are commonly used in agriculture and their toxicity is associated with inhibition of cholinesterase in the exposed organism. Some OPs have been shown to produce OP-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN). The overall goal of the work described in this thesis was to develop bacterial consortia to remediate hazardous substances at significantly higher rates than found with natural systems. Specifically, degradation of methyl parathion (MP) by hydrolysis with a genetically engineered Escherichia coli was investigated along with degradation of one of the resulting products, p-nitrophenol (PNP), by Sphingobium chlorophenolicum ATCC 53874. Simultaneous degradation of both MP and PNP was investigated using a consortium of a genetically engineered Escherichia coli and a native S. chlorophenolicum. Concentrations of MP and PNP were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Non-growing freely suspended recombinant OPH+ E. coli cells efficiently degraded MP without addition of nutrients for growth. Maximum reactor productivity was found with a biomass concentration of 25 g/L. Substrate inhibition did not occur up to 3 g MP/L. The simple Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for enzymatic reactions provided a good fit of the degradation data with Vm=11.45 ??mol/min??g-biomass and Km=2.73 g/L. B. cepacia failed to degrade PNP under the experimental conditions evaluated, so further studies were not conducted. Growing cultures of S. chlorophenolicum degraded PNP at concentrations up to 0.1 g/L without a lag phase in mineral salts glutamate medium. Parameters such as initial pH, growth medium and growth stage for addition of PNP were important degradation factors. The bacterium exhibited substantial growth in the degradation process. Hydroquinone (HQ) or nitrocatechol (NC) were not identified as products of PNP degradation. The recombinant OPH+ E. coli and S. chlorophenolicum consortium failed to degrade PNP when starting with higher concentrations of MP. The presence of organic solvent in the bacterial consortium degradation medium negatively affected the degradation of PNP. The genetically engineered organism efficiently degraded high concentrations of MP, but the resulting high concentration of intermediate product (PNP) inhibited growth of the native type organism. Biodegradation by consortia of genetically engineered non-growing and native-type organisms generally will be limited by the growing native-type organism. Advisors/Committee Members: Engler, Cady (advisor), Kenimer, Ann (committee member), Wild, James (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Methyl parathion; p-Nitrophenol; E. coli; Sphingobium chlorophenolicum; bioremediation; biodegradation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Diaz Casas, A. Z. (2005). Bioremediation of the organophosphate methyl parathion using genetically engineered and native organisms. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2684

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Diaz Casas, Adriana Z. “Bioremediation of the organophosphate methyl parathion using genetically engineered and native organisms.” 2005. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 30, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2684.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Diaz Casas, Adriana Z. “Bioremediation of the organophosphate methyl parathion using genetically engineered and native organisms.” 2005. Web. 30 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Diaz Casas AZ. Bioremediation of the organophosphate methyl parathion using genetically engineered and native organisms. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. [cited 2020 Mar 30]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2684.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Diaz Casas AZ. Bioremediation of the organophosphate methyl parathion using genetically engineered and native organisms. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2684

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Joshi, Vaibhav Venkatesh. Comparison of indigenous and bio-augmented pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading bacteria for remediation of PCP in contaminated groundwater.

Degree: MS, Forest Products, 2013, Mississippi State University

The objective was to compare pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation in contaminated groundwater by indigenous and bio-augmented (<i>Sphingobium chlorophenolicum</i> and <i>Burkholderia cepacia</i>) PCP degrading bacteria. Indigenous bacteria were identified by cloning and sequencing of 16S rDNA fragments while PCP concentrations were determined by GC-ECD. Gene expression for PCP degrading enzymes: chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase (TftD, <i>B. cepacia</i>) and pentachlorophenol-4-monooxygenase (<i>pcp</i>B, <i>S. chlorophenolicum</i>), was determined by RT-PCR. <i>B. cepacia</i>, a PCP degrading bacteria was identified as dominant indigenous bacteria. PCP concentrations correlated negatively with PCP tolerant bacteria and relative fold gene expression in treatments with air-sparging (phase2) compared to without air-sparging (phase1). PCP concentrations decreased and TftD or <i>pcp</i>B expressions were higher in treatments inoculated with <i>B. cepacia</i> (49%, 10.7 fold) or <i>S. chlorophenolicum</i> (32%, 7 fold), respectively, than un-inoculated (indigenous) or mixed culture inoculated treatments. Thus bio-augmentation of indigenous bacteria with <i>B. cepacia</i> or <i>S. chlorophenolicum</i> resulted in more PCP degradation than indigenous bacteria. Advisors/Committee Members: M. Lynn Prewitt (chair), Hamid Borazjani (committee member), Din Pow Ma (committee member), Kenneth O. Willeford (committee member), Dragica Jeremic (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: gene expression; Sphingobium chlorophenolicum.; bioremediation; Burkholderia sp.; bacterial identification

…actively degrade PCP such as Burkholderia cepacia, Pseudomonas sp., Sphingobium chlorophenolicum… …chlorophenolicum. ..................................................................................26… …the pure culture of S. chlorophenolicum (positive control) in phase 1… …chlorophenolicum in phase 1 (without air sparging). .........................87 4.19… …pure cultures of S. chlorophenolicum and B. cepacia)… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Joshi, V. V. (2013). Comparison of indigenous and bio-augmented pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading bacteria for remediation of PCP in contaminated groundwater. (Masters Thesis). Mississippi State University. Retrieved from http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-02212013-113204/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Joshi, Vaibhav Venkatesh. “Comparison of indigenous and bio-augmented pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading bacteria for remediation of PCP in contaminated groundwater.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Mississippi State University. Accessed March 30, 2020. http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-02212013-113204/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Joshi, Vaibhav Venkatesh. “Comparison of indigenous and bio-augmented pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading bacteria for remediation of PCP in contaminated groundwater.” 2013. Web. 30 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Joshi VV. Comparison of indigenous and bio-augmented pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading bacteria for remediation of PCP in contaminated groundwater. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Mississippi State University; 2013. [cited 2020 Mar 30]. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-02212013-113204/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Joshi VV. Comparison of indigenous and bio-augmented pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading bacteria for remediation of PCP in contaminated groundwater. [Masters Thesis]. Mississippi State University; 2013. Available from: http://sun.library.msstate.edu/ETD-db/theses/available/etd-02212013-113204/ ;

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