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You searched for subject:(snub nosed monkey). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Massey University

1. Kreigenhofer, Brigitte Monique. The effect of food provisioning on the nutrient intake of wild and captive primates : implications for the conservation management of wild and captive populations : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctorate of Philosophy in Ecology, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand .

Degree: 2017, Massey University

Many non-human primate populations worldwide are threatened with extinction. Various measures are taken to save these species. Amongst these efforts are habitat protection, restoration, and public education, including wildlife tourism. To efficiently protect and restore wildlife habitats, ecological knowledge, such as the nutritional ecology of target species, is essential. Information on the foraging behaviour and nutritional requirements of a species will be useful for the protection and restoration of foods that are important components of a species’ diet. Furthermore, knowledge on animal nutritional ecology is required in circumstances where animals are fed by humans, as can occur in wildlife tourism settings. With such information, efforts can be made to provide diets which are nutritionally balanced, reducing the likelihood of negatively impacting the health and welfare of target animals. This study was undertaken to investigate food and nutrient intake under three levels of human dietary interference using primates as models: no interference, partial provisioning, and full provisioning. A wild golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) troop was investigated to determine their food and nutrient intake in a natural setting. A positive correlation between food availability and food choice was not found. On the nutrient level, the troop’s proportional consumption of crude protein, lipids, and non-structural carbohydrates varied with the seasonal availability of these nutrients while the consumption of neutral detergent fibre increased relative to its availability and that of lignin decreased. Differences in the foraging behaviour between different seasons and between monkeys of different age, sex, or reproductive status were not detected. However, age and sex based differences in proportional nutrient intake patterns were found. Juveniles had a greater proportional intake of all nutrients than adults (per kg of metabolic body mass) and females had a greater proportional intake of nearly all nutrients than males (per kg of metabolic body mass). To investigate the effects of food provisioning at a wildlife tourism centre in China, the proportional nutrient intake of a semi-wild golden snub-nosed monkey troop was determined and compared with that of the wild troop. The provisioned troop’s foods had a greater proportional contribution of non-structural carbohydrates and lipids and a smaller proportional contribution of neutral detergent fibre and lignin than foods consumed by the wild troop. The proportional nutrient intake of the provisioned troop, compared with that of the wild troop, was greater in non-structural carbohydrates and lower in crude protein, neutral detergent fibre, and lignin. Proportional lipid intake by the provisioned troop was lower than the wild troop in summer but greater in autumn. To investigate the nutritional ecology of a completely captive, and hence nutritionally dependent, troop of primates, the Auckland Zoo’s black-handed spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) troop was studied.…

Subjects/Keywords: Primates; Food; Conservation; Golden snub-nosed monkey; Black-handed spider monkey; Shaanxi Sheng; China

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APA (6th Edition):

Kreigenhofer, B. M. (2017). The effect of food provisioning on the nutrient intake of wild and captive primates : implications for the conservation management of wild and captive populations : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctorate of Philosophy in Ecology, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand . (Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12749

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kreigenhofer, Brigitte Monique. “The effect of food provisioning on the nutrient intake of wild and captive primates : implications for the conservation management of wild and captive populations : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctorate of Philosophy in Ecology, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand .” 2017. Thesis, Massey University. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12749.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kreigenhofer, Brigitte Monique. “The effect of food provisioning on the nutrient intake of wild and captive primates : implications for the conservation management of wild and captive populations : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctorate of Philosophy in Ecology, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand .” 2017. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Kreigenhofer BM. The effect of food provisioning on the nutrient intake of wild and captive primates : implications for the conservation management of wild and captive populations : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctorate of Philosophy in Ecology, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand . [Internet] [Thesis]. Massey University; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12749.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kreigenhofer BM. The effect of food provisioning on the nutrient intake of wild and captive primates : implications for the conservation management of wild and captive populations : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctorate of Philosophy in Ecology, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand . [Thesis]. Massey University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12749

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Kyoto University

2. Liu, Jie. The co-existence of endangered primate species and ethnic groups in southwest China .

Degree: 2020, Kyoto University

Subjects/Keywords: Conservation; Ethno-primatology; François’ langur; Yunnan snub-nosed monkey; Lisu people

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, J. (2020). The co-existence of endangered primate species and ethnic groups in southwest China . (Thesis). Kyoto University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2433/253136

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Jie. “The co-existence of endangered primate species and ethnic groups in southwest China .” 2020. Thesis, Kyoto University. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2433/253136.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Jie. “The co-existence of endangered primate species and ethnic groups in southwest China .” 2020. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Liu J. The co-existence of endangered primate species and ethnic groups in southwest China . [Internet] [Thesis]. Kyoto University; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/253136.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Liu J. The co-existence of endangered primate species and ethnic groups in southwest China . [Thesis]. Kyoto University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/253136

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Yan, Caie. Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies.

Degree: PhD, 0340, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This study aimed to explore the benefits that individuals gain from group living and the role of kin and nonkin affiliation and cooperation in the formation of social networks in primates by investigating the multi-level social structures exhibited by Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana). The multi-level social network of snub-nosed monkeys composed of over 100 individuals, in which individuals form one-male breeding units (OMUs, which include one adult male, several adult females, and their offspring), all male units (AMUs), and bands (several OMUs that travel, feed and rest together). Given the fact that the majority of Asian colobines exhibit a harem social organization, multi-level societies of R. roxellana are proposed to have evolved through the aggregation of individual one-male groups. The specific objectives of this study are to explore 1) the social factors that help to maintain the stability of multilevel societies, 2) the benefits to individuals of forming a higher level social structure, 3) the presence and complexity of kinship networks and dispersal patterns in R. roxellana based on genetic data, and 4) the behavioral mechanisms regulating social interactions within multi-level social networks, and whether these are most consistent with kin selection theory, reciprocity theories, or biological market theory. Behavioral observations for this study were conducted at Zhouzhi National Natural Reserve, Shaanxi, China. A habituated band of snub-nosed monkeys was followed from September 2007 to August 2008. Along with behavioral observations, fecal samples were collected from the focal band and two neighboring bands. DNA was extracted from the fecal samples. The d-loop region of the mitochondrial DNA was amplified and sequenced for each sample. The behavioral data indicate that OMUs were socially and sexual independent since the majority of social and sexual interactions were restricted to members of the same OMU. Both direct affiliative and agonistic interactions between members of different OMUs were infrequent. Compared to the harems formed by other Asian colobines, the OMUs of R. roxellana were more cohesive. Leader males played a critical role in maintaining the cohesion of his OMU by actively threatening or chasing both adult and juvenile members of other OMUs that were within 5 meters of his harem. It is likely that the formation of multi-level societies in R. roxellana is the result of social and spatial tolerance among harem males in response to the foraging requirements associated with the exploitation of highly seasonal and low productive habitat. Three distinct haplotypes were found among 99 samples collected from the three neighboring bands. Based on the assumption that individuals with less frequent haplotypes represent immigrants from other bands, it was estimated that approximately 17-21% of females and 8-15% of males immigrated from neighboring bands. The genetic data also indicated that females transfer between OMUs within the same band since females with the same… Advisors/Committee Members: Garber, Paul A. (advisor), Garber, Paul A. (Committee Chair), Malhi, Ripan S. (committee member), Stumpf, Rebecca M. (committee member), Swedell, Larissa (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Rhinopithecus roxellana; snub-nosed monkey; multi-level society; social interaction; dispersal pattern; kin selection; reciprocity; biological market theory

snub-nosed monkey was not determined by kinship. In addition, the results of this study show… …interactions in the Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana). Snub-nosed… …objectives of this study are to investigate the social interaction pattern of snub-nosed monkeys… …easy to identify, and therefore recording deception in snub-nosed monkeys was not an… …snub-nosed monkeys. 1.7 Outlines of Chapters Chapter 2. Multi-level societies in primates… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yan, C. (2012). Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31175

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yan, Caie. “Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31175.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yan, Caie. “Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies.” 2012. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Yan C. Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31175.

Council of Science Editors:

Yan C. Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31175

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