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You searched for subject:(self perceived participation). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Kansas State University

1. Ragusa, Sarah R. Examining the relationship between group work and students’ willingness to participate.

Degree: MA, Department of Communication Studies, Theatre, and Dance, 2010, Kansas State University

In this thesis study, the use of group work as an instructional strategy was assessed to determine the effect it has on students’ willingness to communicate, communication apprehension, and self-perceived competence. Students enrolled in a basic public speaking at a major Midwestern university completed Neer’s (1987) Classroom Apprehension about Participation Scale (CAPS) at the beginning of the semester and again four weeks later after being exposed to a treatment of group or no group. Results indicated students’ willingness to communicate and self-perceived competence increased over the four-week duration of the study regardless of treatment. However, a significant reduction of communication apprehension was seen in students using group work in their classrooms. Limitations and implications are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Leann M. Brazeal.

Subjects/Keywords: classroom participation; group; willingness to communicate; self-perceived competence; communication apprehension; Education, Curriculum and Instruction (0727); Education, Secondary (0533); Speech Communication (0459)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ragusa, S. R. (2010). Examining the relationship between group work and students’ willingness to participate. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/4104

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ragusa, Sarah R. “Examining the relationship between group work and students’ willingness to participate.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/4104.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ragusa, Sarah R. “Examining the relationship between group work and students’ willingness to participate.” 2010. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Ragusa SR. Examining the relationship between group work and students’ willingness to participate. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/4104.

Council of Science Editors:

Ragusa SR. Examining the relationship between group work and students’ willingness to participate. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/4104

2. Ripat, Jacqueline Dawn. Self-perceived participation amongst adults with spinal cord injuries: the role of assistive technology.

Degree: Applied Health Sciences, 2011, University of Manitoba

The purpose of this research was to develop a theoretical understanding of the influences on participation for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) from a self-perceived perspective, with particular focus on the role of assistive technology (AT) in self-perceived participation. The theoretical underpinning, symbolic interactionism, was used to gain an understanding of the ways that adults with SCI ascribe meaning to the interaction between themselves and their unique environments in a process of participation. A grounded theory study of 19 adults with SCI was conducted. Participants engaged in individual in-depth interviews, used photovoice as a framework for taking photographs of aspects of their environment that promoted and restricted participation, and engaged in focus groups. The constructed grounded theory is summarized as follows: Negotiating the Body-environment Interface is a continuous process for those living with a SCI. Despite the relative stability of their changed body, they Live in a Changed World, one perceived differently after SCI. Four sets of strategies are used by individuals to interact within their unique environments: creating an accessible proximal environment; using AT and adaptations; advocating and educating; and gaining information and knowledge. Strategies were selected to engage in a Process of Participation, a process that consisted of a sense of inclusion, autonomy, accomplishment, and reciprocity. Intervening conditions were the physical (architectural, natural), socio-cultural (social supports, societal attitudes), and institutional (services, policies) environmental aspects that served as barriers or facilitators to the process of participation. The study has added to the growing body of literature on self-perceived participation that forefronts the sense of connectivity and engagement people feel within their environment. The findings highlighted how AT holds unique meaning, and how decisions around use of technology for participation is influenced by personal factors, and physical, socio-cultural, and institutional environments. A new definition of AT was constructed that acknowledges the environmental influences and importance of self-perceived participation as an outcome of AT use. This research highlights the instrumental role of the environment in supporting self-perceived participation of adults with SCI. Further research on developing ways to create inclusive and supportive environments for assistive technology users is warranted. Advisors/Committee Members: Woodgate, Roberta (Nursing) (supervisor), Halas, Joannie (Kinesiology and Recreation Management) Etcheverry, Emily (Medical Rehabilitation) Medved, Maria (Psychology) Rigby, Patty (University of Toronto) (examiningcommittee).

Subjects/Keywords: self-perceived participation; assistive technology; assistive technology-environment interface; spinal cord injury

…116 Chapter 9: The role of assistive technology in self-perceived participation ...... 117… …provides the rationale behind the premise that studying the self-perceived participation… …Perenboom & Chorus, 2003) and self-perceived participation is viewed as a process that… …of participation for individuals with SCI, however in one recent study self-perceived… …role in self-perceived participation. Decision-making frameworks that provide guidance on… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ripat, J. D. (2011). Self-perceived participation amongst adults with spinal cord injuries: the role of assistive technology. (Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4923

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ripat, Jacqueline Dawn. “Self-perceived participation amongst adults with spinal cord injuries: the role of assistive technology.” 2011. Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4923.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ripat, Jacqueline Dawn. “Self-perceived participation amongst adults with spinal cord injuries: the role of assistive technology.” 2011. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Ripat JD. Self-perceived participation amongst adults with spinal cord injuries: the role of assistive technology. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4923.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ripat JD. Self-perceived participation amongst adults with spinal cord injuries: the role of assistive technology. [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/4923

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.