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You searched for subject:(self paced reading). Showing records 1 – 16 of 16 total matches.

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Universiteit Utrecht

1. Tolboom, S.J. Individual differences in processing temporarily ambiguous quantifiers.

Degree: 2012, Universiteit Utrecht

 In previous research, individual differences have been found in quantifier interpretation. When people are asked to complete sentences such as “Four flowers were put in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: quantifier; discourse; self-paced reading; individual differences

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APA (6th Edition):

Tolboom, S. J. (2012). Individual differences in processing temporarily ambiguous quantifiers. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/256085

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tolboom, S J. “Individual differences in processing temporarily ambiguous quantifiers.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/256085.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tolboom, S J. “Individual differences in processing temporarily ambiguous quantifiers.” 2012. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Tolboom SJ. Individual differences in processing temporarily ambiguous quantifiers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2012. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/256085.

Council of Science Editors:

Tolboom SJ. Individual differences in processing temporarily ambiguous quantifiers. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2012. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/256085


University of Edinburgh

2. Rusbridge, Sarah. Processing pronouns: Effects of content-based properties of potential antecedents and similarity-based interference.

Degree: 2008, University of Edinburgh

 This report examines the process of antecedent identification for pronouns, which is an essential part of language comprehension in general. The interactive-parallel constraint model proposes… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Pronoun resolution; Sentence processing; Similarity-based interference; Self-paced reading

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APA (6th Edition):

Rusbridge, S. (2008). Processing pronouns: Effects of content-based properties of potential antecedents and similarity-based interference. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2948

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rusbridge, Sarah. “Processing pronouns: Effects of content-based properties of potential antecedents and similarity-based interference.” 2008. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2948.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rusbridge, Sarah. “Processing pronouns: Effects of content-based properties of potential antecedents and similarity-based interference.” 2008. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Rusbridge S. Processing pronouns: Effects of content-based properties of potential antecedents and similarity-based interference. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2008. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2948.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rusbridge S. Processing pronouns: Effects of content-based properties of potential antecedents and similarity-based interference. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2948

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Kansas

3. Lopez Prego, Beatriz. The online use of markedness information in L1 and L2 Spanish gender agreement.

Degree: PhD, Linguistics, 2015, University of Kansas

 ABSTRACT The present study focuses on the acquisition and processing of gender agreement by second language (L2) learners of Spanish, whose first language (L1; English)… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Linguistics; Morphology; agreement; gender; markedness; processing; self-paced reading; Spanish

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APA (6th Edition):

Lopez Prego, B. (2015). The online use of markedness information in L1 and L2 Spanish gender agreement. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21693

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lopez Prego, Beatriz. “The online use of markedness information in L1 and L2 Spanish gender agreement.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21693.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lopez Prego, Beatriz. “The online use of markedness information in L1 and L2 Spanish gender agreement.” 2015. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Lopez Prego B. The online use of markedness information in L1 and L2 Spanish gender agreement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21693.

Council of Science Editors:

Lopez Prego B. The online use of markedness information in L1 and L2 Spanish gender agreement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/21693


University of Edinburgh

4. Frassinelli, Diego. The effect of context on the activation and processing of word meaning over time.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Edinburgh

 The aim of this thesis is to study the effect that linguistic context exerts on the activation and processing of word meaning over time. Previous… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: 410.285; language comprehension; incrementality; context effects; eye-tracking; self-paced reading

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APA (6th Edition):

Frassinelli, D. (2015). The effect of context on the activation and processing of word meaning over time. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/10508

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Frassinelli, Diego. “The effect of context on the activation and processing of word meaning over time.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Edinburgh. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/10508.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Frassinelli, Diego. “The effect of context on the activation and processing of word meaning over time.” 2015. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Frassinelli D. The effect of context on the activation and processing of word meaning over time. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/10508.

Council of Science Editors:

Frassinelli D. The effect of context on the activation and processing of word meaning over time. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/10508


University of Southern California

5. He, Xiao. What 'you' and 'I' can say about reference resolution and non-structural constraints.

Degree: PhD, Linguistics, 2014, University of Southern California

 Real‐time reference resolution has been extensively studied in psycholinguistics. However, there is still debate on what constrains the interpretation of referential forms in real‐time. There… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: reference resolution; anaphora; Chinese; linguistics; psycholinguistics; self‐paced reading; eye‐tracking

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APA (6th Edition):

He, X. (2014). What 'you' and 'I' can say about reference resolution and non-structural constraints. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/459398/rec/7881

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

He, Xiao. “What 'you' and 'I' can say about reference resolution and non-structural constraints.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/459398/rec/7881.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

He, Xiao. “What 'you' and 'I' can say about reference resolution and non-structural constraints.” 2014. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

He X. What 'you' and 'I' can say about reference resolution and non-structural constraints. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/459398/rec/7881.

Council of Science Editors:

He X. What 'you' and 'I' can say about reference resolution and non-structural constraints. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/459398/rec/7881


University of Texas – Austin

6. Chen, Po-Ting. Typicality in Chinese sentence processing : evidence from offline judgment and online self-paced reading.

Degree: Linguistics, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

 This study examines how Chinese speakers understand sentences describing events that have varying degrees of typicality. How the interpretation of typicality is obtained from linguistic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Event typicality; Chinese sentence processing; Psycholinguistics; Self-paced reading

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APA (6th Edition):

Chen, P. (2014). Typicality in Chinese sentence processing : evidence from offline judgment and online self-paced reading. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/27143

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Po-Ting. “Typicality in Chinese sentence processing : evidence from offline judgment and online self-paced reading.” 2014. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/27143.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Po-Ting. “Typicality in Chinese sentence processing : evidence from offline judgment and online self-paced reading.” 2014. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Chen P. Typicality in Chinese sentence processing : evidence from offline judgment and online self-paced reading. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/27143.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chen P. Typicality in Chinese sentence processing : evidence from offline judgment and online self-paced reading. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/27143

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Arizona

7. Witzel, Jeffrey D. Backwards and forwards: Behavioral and neurophysiological investigations into dependency processing .

Degree: 2010, University of Arizona

 This dissertation examines the processing of sentences involving long-distance linguistic dependencies, or sentences containing elements that must be linked across intervening words and phrases. Specifically,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: anaphora; EEG; eye tracking; filler-gap; relative clause; self-paced reading

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APA (6th Edition):

Witzel, J. D. (2010). Backwards and forwards: Behavioral and neurophysiological investigations into dependency processing . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195182

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Witzel, Jeffrey D. “Backwards and forwards: Behavioral and neurophysiological investigations into dependency processing .” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195182.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Witzel, Jeffrey D. “Backwards and forwards: Behavioral and neurophysiological investigations into dependency processing .” 2010. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Witzel JD. Backwards and forwards: Behavioral and neurophysiological investigations into dependency processing . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195182.

Council of Science Editors:

Witzel JD. Backwards and forwards: Behavioral and neurophysiological investigations into dependency processing . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195182


University of Kansas

8. Johnson, Adrienne Marie. INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN PREDICTIVE PROCESSING: EVIDENCE FROM SUBJECT FILLED-GAP EFFECTS IN NATIVE AND NONNATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH.

Degree: PhD, Linguistics, 2015, University of Kansas

 This study examined whether native and non-native speakers of English show evidence of predictive processing in the domain of syntax, and investigated the extent to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Linguistics; attention; individual differences; prediction; second language processing; self-paced reading; wh-dependencies

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, A. M. (2015). INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN PREDICTIVE PROCESSING: EVIDENCE FROM SUBJECT FILLED-GAP EFFECTS IN NATIVE AND NONNATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/19174

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Adrienne Marie. “INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN PREDICTIVE PROCESSING: EVIDENCE FROM SUBJECT FILLED-GAP EFFECTS IN NATIVE AND NONNATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/19174.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Adrienne Marie. “INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN PREDICTIVE PROCESSING: EVIDENCE FROM SUBJECT FILLED-GAP EFFECTS IN NATIVE AND NONNATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH.” 2015. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Johnson AM. INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN PREDICTIVE PROCESSING: EVIDENCE FROM SUBJECT FILLED-GAP EFFECTS IN NATIVE AND NONNATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/19174.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson AM. INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN PREDICTIVE PROCESSING: EVIDENCE FROM SUBJECT FILLED-GAP EFFECTS IN NATIVE AND NONNATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/19174


Universiteit Utrecht

9. Dekker, S.V. Force Dimensions in Dutch Manner Adverbs: A self-paced reading study into inferences.

Degree: 2016, Universiteit Utrecht

 The goal of this thesis is to find empirical evidence for the subdivision of manner adverbs into mono-dimensional adverbs such as lightly, directly modifying a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: adverbial modification; defeasible inferences; self-paced reading experiment; Neo-Davidsonian Semantics; conceptual knowledge

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APA (6th Edition):

Dekker, S. V. (2016). Force Dimensions in Dutch Manner Adverbs: A self-paced reading study into inferences. (Masters Thesis). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/338913

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dekker, S V. “Force Dimensions in Dutch Manner Adverbs: A self-paced reading study into inferences.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/338913.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dekker, S V. “Force Dimensions in Dutch Manner Adverbs: A self-paced reading study into inferences.” 2016. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Dekker SV. Force Dimensions in Dutch Manner Adverbs: A self-paced reading study into inferences. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2016. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/338913.

Council of Science Editors:

Dekker SV. Force Dimensions in Dutch Manner Adverbs: A self-paced reading study into inferences. [Masters Thesis]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2016. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/338913


Boston University

10. Garbarino, Julianne T. The role of working memory in comprehension of doubly embedded relative clauses: a self-paced reading and eye tracking study.

Degree: MS, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, 2013, Boston University

 Language processing has been a focus of working memory research since Baddeley introduced his Model of Working Memory in the 1970’s. There has been continued… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Working memory; Doubly embedded relative clauses; Comprehension; Self-paced reading; Eye tracking study

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APA (6th Edition):

Garbarino, J. T. (2013). The role of working memory in comprehension of doubly embedded relative clauses: a self-paced reading and eye tracking study. (Masters Thesis). Boston University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2144/17156

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garbarino, Julianne T. “The role of working memory in comprehension of doubly embedded relative clauses: a self-paced reading and eye tracking study.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Boston University. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2144/17156.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garbarino, Julianne T. “The role of working memory in comprehension of doubly embedded relative clauses: a self-paced reading and eye tracking study.” 2013. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Garbarino JT. The role of working memory in comprehension of doubly embedded relative clauses: a self-paced reading and eye tracking study. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Boston University; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/17156.

Council of Science Editors:

Garbarino JT. The role of working memory in comprehension of doubly embedded relative clauses: a self-paced reading and eye tracking study. [Masters Thesis]. Boston University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/17156


University of Cambridge

11. Prawatmuang, Woramon. Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition : evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Cambridge

 This study investigates second language (L2) acquisition of word orders and markers of collectivity in Chinese and Thai. One of the differences between Chinese and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: second language acquisition; Chinese; Thai; word order; form-function; feature re-assembly; positive evidence; indirect negative evidence; probabilistic learning; SLA; L2; collective marker; self-paced reading; acceptability judgment; reading time; input; form-function connection

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APA (6th Edition):

Prawatmuang, W. (2018). Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition : evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270338 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.744439

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prawatmuang, Woramon. “Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition : evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cambridge. Accessed August 20, 2019. https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270338 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.744439.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prawatmuang, Woramon. “Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition : evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai.” 2018. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Prawatmuang W. Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition : evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2018. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270338 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.744439.

Council of Science Editors:

Prawatmuang W. Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition : evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2018. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270338 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.744439


University of Cambridge

12. Prawatmuang, Woramon. Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition: Evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai .

Degree: 2018, University of Cambridge

 This study investigates second language (L2) acquisition of word orders and markers of collectivity in Chinese and Thai. One of the differences between Chinese and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: second language acquisition; Chinese; Thai; word order; form-function; feature re-assembly; positive evidence; indirect negative evidence; probabilistic learning; SLA; L2; collective marker; self-paced reading; acceptability judgment; reading time; input; form-function connection

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APA (6th Edition):

Prawatmuang, W. (2018). Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition: Evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai . (Thesis). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270338

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prawatmuang, Woramon. “Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition: Evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai .” 2018. Thesis, University of Cambridge. Accessed August 20, 2019. https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270338.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prawatmuang, Woramon. “Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition: Evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai .” 2018. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Prawatmuang W. Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition: Evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Cambridge; 2018. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270338.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Prawatmuang W. Effects of positive evidence, indirect negative evidence and form-function transparency on second language acquisition: Evidence from L2 Chinese and L2 Thai . [Thesis]. University of Cambridge; 2018. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/270338

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

13. Politzer-Ahles, Stephen. Psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic investigations of scalar implicature.

Degree: PhD, Linguistics, 2013, University of Kansas

 The present study examines the representation and composition of meaning in scalar implicatures. Scalar implicature is the phenomenon whereby the use of a less informative… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psycholinguistics; Erp; Mandarin; Pragmatics; Quantifier; Scalar implicature; Self-paced reading; Neurolinguistics

…169 Appendix C: Self-paced reading stimuli (Experiments 4 & 5)… …132 Figure 22. Self-paced reading times for some of sentences with real-word background… …133 Figure 23. Self-paced reading times for only some of sentences with real-word background… …a self-paced reading task to examine whether the realization of inference-based meaning… …verification or self-paced reading tasks. Response times in such tasks, however, may reflect not only… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Politzer-Ahles, S. (2013). Psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic investigations of scalar implicature. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/12280

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Politzer-Ahles, Stephen. “Psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic investigations of scalar implicature.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/12280.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Politzer-Ahles, Stephen. “Psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic investigations of scalar implicature.” 2013. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Politzer-Ahles S. Psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic investigations of scalar implicature. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/12280.

Council of Science Editors:

Politzer-Ahles S. Psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic investigations of scalar implicature. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/12280

14. Enzinna, Naomi R. The Processing of Preposition-Stranding Constructions in English.

Degree: MA, Linguistics, 2013, Florida International University

  One of the prominent questions in modern psycholinguistics is the relationship between the grammar and the parser. Within the approach of Generative Grammar, this… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: preposition-stranding; p-stranding; minimal structure principle; pied-piping; prepositions; language processing; self paced reading task; Linguistics

…111 4.2. Self-Paced Reading Task… …self-paced reading task, an on-line processing test that measures participants’ unconscious… …112 4.2.1. Reading Times per Sentence Type… …113 4.2.1.1. Reading Times per Sentence Type: Whole Sentence… …113 4.2.1.2. Reading Times per Sentence Type: Sentence per Character… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Enzinna, N. R. (2013). The Processing of Preposition-Stranding Constructions in English. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/889 ; 10.25148/etd.FI13042515 ; FI13042515

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Enzinna, Naomi R. “The Processing of Preposition-Stranding Constructions in English.” 2013. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/889 ; 10.25148/etd.FI13042515 ; FI13042515.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Enzinna, Naomi R. “The Processing of Preposition-Stranding Constructions in English.” 2013. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Enzinna NR. The Processing of Preposition-Stranding Constructions in English. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/889 ; 10.25148/etd.FI13042515 ; FI13042515.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Enzinna NR. The Processing of Preposition-Stranding Constructions in English. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2013. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/889 ; 10.25148/etd.FI13042515 ; FI13042515

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

15. Hajek, Jonathan. Implicit graphemic cues in Thai reading.

Degree: MA, 0301, 2013, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

 Languages that do not use space or other punctuation to demarcate word boundaries typically show improvements in early reading time measures when spaces are inserted.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Thai; Visual salience; Punctuation; Space; Self-paced reading; Grapheme; Orthography; Parafoveal preview; Word segmentation; Perception; Eye movement

…x29; in which the words are revealed in a self-paced reading paradigm. To manipulate the… …stimuli appeared on a single line when presented on the screen for the self-paced reading study… …presented in a word-by-word, self-paced reading fashion and was followed by a true/false… …benefits of a given region can carry over into the following region in self-paced reading. 11… …11; #11; The results of this self-paced reading require further testing with a more sensitive… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hajek, J. (2013). Implicit graphemic cues in Thai reading. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45483

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hajek, Jonathan. “Implicit graphemic cues in Thai reading.” 2013. Thesis, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45483.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hajek, Jonathan. “Implicit graphemic cues in Thai reading.” 2013. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Hajek J. Implicit graphemic cues in Thai reading. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45483.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hajek J. Implicit graphemic cues in Thai reading. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45483

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

16. Miller, Brian W. Motivating science learning.

Degree: PhD, 0210, 2011, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

 Dual-processing theories of conceptual change hypothesize that if children are more personally involved in a lesson they will process the information more deeply leading to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Conceptual change; science education; naive theories; classroom discussion; collaborative reasoning; depth of processing; self-paced reading; argumentative discussion; mixed-effects models

…and think. This study intends to investigate how these three processes of talking, reading… …of researchers have self-identified their research as belonging to a ―warming trend‖ in… …After reading the message there was no main effect for the authoritativeness of the source… …overcome this tendency. This model of cognition is not unique to the ELM. For example, in reading… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Miller, B. W. (2011). Motivating science learning. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24110

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller, Brian W. “Motivating science learning.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed August 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24110.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller, Brian W. “Motivating science learning.” 2011. Web. 20 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Miller BW. Motivating science learning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2011. [cited 2019 Aug 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24110.

Council of Science Editors:

Miller BW. Motivating science learning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24110

.