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You searched for subject:(sea cucumber aquaculture). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Victoria

1. Fortune, Angela Caroline. Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture with the California sea cucumber (parastichopus californicus): investigating grow-out cage design for juvenile sea cucumbers co-cultured with Pacific oysters (crassostrea gigas).

Degree: Department of Geography, 2018, University of Victoria

Excess nutrients in the form of uneaten food or waste from intensive, monospecies aquaculture farms can have negative effects on the surrounding natural ecosystem, causing eutrophication and benthic habitat degradation. Biomitigative techniques such as Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) are being investigated for their ability to reduce these negative environmental impacts. IMTA is the co-culture of multiple species from complementary trophic levels, physically orientated in such a way that excess waste nutrients from the fed component are intercepted by the extractive species. For IMTA systems to become a sustainable aquaculture design alternative, it is important to ensure that infrastructure orientation and stocking densities of the extractive species maximize the amount of excess nutrients intercepted and overall system efficiency. Previous research has shown that the majority of wastes from fed finfish are made up of large organic particulates which sink rapidly to the benthos underneath or near the fish cages and which would be available to benthic deposit-feeding species. The California sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus) is a promising extractive species for IMTA on the west coast of Canada due to its deposit-feeding behaviour and its relatively high market price. Owing to the sea cucumber’s morphology and ability to move through restricted spaces, containment can be difficult without reducing nutrient transfer and overall IMTA system efficiency (i.e. mesh sizes needed to contain small sea cucumbers may restrict flow of farm particulates to them). The overall goal of the present work is to effectively contain juvenile sea cucumbers in such a way that maximizes benthic extraction of large-particulate nutrients within an IMTA system. Advisors/Committee Members: Pearce, Christopher Michael (supervisor), Cross, Stephen Fredrick (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture; Sea Cucumber; Parastichopus californicus

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APA (6th Edition):

Fortune, A. C. (2018). Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture with the California sea cucumber (parastichopus californicus): investigating grow-out cage design for juvenile sea cucumbers co-cultured with Pacific oysters (crassostrea gigas). (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10171

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fortune, Angela Caroline. “Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture with the California sea cucumber (parastichopus californicus): investigating grow-out cage design for juvenile sea cucumbers co-cultured with Pacific oysters (crassostrea gigas).” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 10, 2019. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10171.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fortune, Angela Caroline. “Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture with the California sea cucumber (parastichopus californicus): investigating grow-out cage design for juvenile sea cucumbers co-cultured with Pacific oysters (crassostrea gigas).” 2018. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Fortune AC. Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture with the California sea cucumber (parastichopus californicus): investigating grow-out cage design for juvenile sea cucumbers co-cultured with Pacific oysters (crassostrea gigas). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10171.

Council of Science Editors:

Fortune AC. Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture with the California sea cucumber (parastichopus californicus): investigating grow-out cage design for juvenile sea cucumbers co-cultured with Pacific oysters (crassostrea gigas). [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10171


University of Victoria

2. Prussin, Emrys Adain. Spatial distribution of the nutrient plume emanating from an Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia: use of an in-situ kelp bioassay to monitor nutrient loading.

Degree: Dept. of Geography, 2012, University of Victoria

To assess the spatial distribution of nutrient wastes around an open-water integrated fish/mollusk/kelp farm in-situ kelp bioassays were employed. Growth rates were measured over a four-month growing season and used as a proxy for relative nutrient concentrations. Seasonality and depth effects on growth rate were also assessed. Growth around the pens was 0.20 cm • day-1 higher than at the control, and reached a maximum of 1.4 cm • day-1. Optimal growth was achieved at 8 m. Growth at 8 m was significantly higher by 1.5 cm • day-1 compared to surface waters at 2 m. Early spring had the highest growth rates with a peak of 1.4 cm • day-1 recorded on June 21. This study re-iterates the fundamental benefits of IMTA and shows the potential of in-situ assay as an alternative to error-prone and costly water sampling to asses nutrient status in water. Advisors/Committee Members: Cross, Stephen Fredrick (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: IMTA; Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture; Laminaria saccharina; Saccharina latissima; Bioremediation; Biomonitoring; Eutrophication; Kelp; Aquaculture; Sable Fish; Mussels; Scallops; Sea Cucumber

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Prussin, E. A. (2012). Spatial distribution of the nutrient plume emanating from an Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia: use of an in-situ kelp bioassay to monitor nutrient loading. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3998

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prussin, Emrys Adain. “Spatial distribution of the nutrient plume emanating from an Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia: use of an in-situ kelp bioassay to monitor nutrient loading.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3998.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prussin, Emrys Adain. “Spatial distribution of the nutrient plume emanating from an Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia: use of an in-situ kelp bioassay to monitor nutrient loading.” 2012. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Prussin EA. Spatial distribution of the nutrient plume emanating from an Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia: use of an in-situ kelp bioassay to monitor nutrient loading. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3998.

Council of Science Editors:

Prussin EA. Spatial distribution of the nutrient plume emanating from an Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia: use of an in-situ kelp bioassay to monitor nutrient loading. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3998

3. Shannon, Regina M. Stress Susceptibility of Echinoderms Reared Under Aquaculture Conditions.

Degree: 2015, IPFW

Sea urchins and sea cucumbers are becoming increasingly important sources of food and marine pharmaceuticals. Sea urchin roe has been considered a delicacy for many years, and the demand for it has been increasing. Sea cucumbers are a valuable resource both for food and the production of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Though there have been many fisheries established to harvest sea urchins, many of them have been greatly depleted, or yield poor quality roe. Since the sea cucumber is such a valuable product, the market for the giant California sea cucumber, Parastichopus californicus, has greatly increased, which has caused the establishment of fisheries along the west coast of North America. However, because the sea cucumber industry is poorly regulated, the fisheries are not believed to be sustainable, and there is interest in promoting the aquaculture of this species. In order to alleviate these problems, both for sea urchins and sea cucumbers, intensive aquaculture is generating interest as a solution. However, when an animal is placed into an artificial system, there are a variety of stresses that it can encounter, such as salinity changes or handling. In addition, sea urchins are a primary research model for embryological and developmental research, and sea cucumbers are being used in research as sources of marine based medicines, both of which necessitates the handling of the adult animals, which can cause stress. Since aquaculture conditions can cause stress to animals, which makes them more susceptible to disease, it is important to determine the stress susceptibility of sea urchins and sea cucumber to two potential stresses, handling and low salinity. In order to study the impact of these stressors, a variety of physiological and immunological assays were done on the coelomic fluid of purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and giant California sea cucumbers. Assays included total and differential cell counts, packed cell volume, coelomic fluid protein, phagocytic capacity, lytic activity, and respiratory burst activity. These assays were chosen as there tend to be clear changes in individuals that experience stress as compared to unstressed individuals. Our results indicated that low salinity and handling both cause significant stress responses in both physiological and immunological parameters in sea urchins relative to controls. For sea cucumbers, there were few significant differences from the control, and no differences in parameters analyzing immune function. These results indicate that the giant California sea cucumber is more likely to be productive in an aquaculture environment than the purple sea urchin, and that facilities interested in raising sea urchins should be particularly careful to avoid any condition that is potentially stressful.

Subjects/Keywords: echinoderms; immunology; stress; sea urchin aquaculture; sea cucumber aquaculture; Animal Sciences; Aquaculture and Fisheries; Cell and Developmental Biology; Cell Biology; Other Physiology; Physiology; Zoology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shannon, R. M. (2015). Stress Susceptibility of Echinoderms Reared Under Aquaculture Conditions. (Masters Thesis). IPFW. Retrieved from http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/52

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shannon, Regina M. “Stress Susceptibility of Echinoderms Reared Under Aquaculture Conditions.” 2015. Masters Thesis, IPFW. Accessed December 10, 2019. http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/52.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shannon, Regina M. “Stress Susceptibility of Echinoderms Reared Under Aquaculture Conditions.” 2015. Web. 10 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Shannon RM. Stress Susceptibility of Echinoderms Reared Under Aquaculture Conditions. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. IPFW; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 10]. Available from: http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/52.

Council of Science Editors:

Shannon RM. Stress Susceptibility of Echinoderms Reared Under Aquaculture Conditions. [Masters Thesis]. IPFW; 2015. Available from: http://opus.ipfw.edu/masters_theses/52

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