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You searched for subject:(scent collection). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Florida International University

1. Sanchez, Claudia L, Ms. Evaluation of the Scent Collection System for Its Effectiveness in Volatile Organic Compound Collection and Use in Canine Training.

Degree: MS, Chemistry, 2015, Florida International University

As a result of increased terrorist activity around the world, the development of a canine training aid suitable for daily military operations is necessary to provide effective canine explosive detection. Since the use of sniffer dogs has proven to be a reliable resource for the rapid detection of explosive volatiles organic compounds, the present study evaluated the ability of the Human Scent Collection System (HSCS) device for the creation of training aids for plasticized / tagged explosives, nitroglycerin and TNT containing explosives, and smokeless powders for canine training purposes. Through canine field testing, it was demonstrated that volatiles dynamically collected from real explosive material provided a positive canine response showing the effectiveness of the HSCS in creating canine training aids that can be used immediately or up to several weeks (3) after collection under proper storage conditions. These reliable non-hazardous training aids allow its use in areas where real explosive material aids are not practical and/or available. Advisors/Committee Members: Kenneth G. Furton, Yong Cai, Bruce McCord.

Subjects/Keywords: explosives; training aid; solid phase micro-extraction; human scent collection system; dynamic and static collection; canine detection; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/electron capture detector.; Analytical Chemistry; Chemistry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sanchez, Claudia L, M. (2015). Evaluation of the Scent Collection System for Its Effectiveness in Volatile Organic Compound Collection and Use in Canine Training. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1914 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15032116 ; FI15032116

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sanchez, Claudia L, Ms. “Evaluation of the Scent Collection System for Its Effectiveness in Volatile Organic Compound Collection and Use in Canine Training.” 2015. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed August 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1914 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15032116 ; FI15032116.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sanchez, Claudia L, Ms. “Evaluation of the Scent Collection System for Its Effectiveness in Volatile Organic Compound Collection and Use in Canine Training.” 2015. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Sanchez, Claudia L M. Evaluation of the Scent Collection System for Its Effectiveness in Volatile Organic Compound Collection and Use in Canine Training. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2015. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1914 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15032116 ; FI15032116.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sanchez, Claudia L M. Evaluation of the Scent Collection System for Its Effectiveness in Volatile Organic Compound Collection and Use in Canine Training. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2015. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1914 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15032116 ; FI15032116

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Florida International University

2. DeGreeff, Lauryn E. Development of a Dynamic Headspace Concentration Technique for the Non-Contact Sampling of Human Odor Samples and the Creation of Canine Training Aids.

Degree: Chemistry, 2010, Florida International University

Human scent and human remains detection canines are used to locate living or deceased humans under many circumstances. Human scent canines locate individual humans on the basis of their unique scent profile, while human remains detection canines locate the general scent of decomposing human remains. Scent evidence is often collected by law enforcement agencies using a Scent Transfer Unit, a dynamic headspace concentration device. The goals of this research were to evaluate the STU-100 for the collection of human scent samples, and to apply this method to the collection of living and deceased human samples, and to the creation of canine training aids. The airflow rate and collection material used with the STU-100 were evaluated using a novel scent delivery method. Controlled Odor Mimic Permeation Systems were created containing representative standard compounds delivered at known rates, improving the reproducibility of optimization experiments. Flow rates and collection materials were compared. Higher air flow rates usually yielded significantly less total volatile compounds due to compound breakthrough through the collection material. Collection from polymer and cellulose-based materials demonstrated that the molecular backbone of the material is a factor in the trapping and releasing of compounds. The weave of the material also affects compound collection, as those materials with a tighter weave demonstrated enhanced collection efficiencies. Using the optimized method, volatiles were efficiently collected from living and deceased humans. Replicates of the living human samples showed good reproducibility; however, the odor profiles from individuals were not always distinguishable from one another. Analysis of the human remains samples revealed similarity in the type and ratio of compounds. Two types of prototype training aids were developed utilizing combinations of pure compounds as well as volatiles from actual human samples concentrated onto sorbents, which were subsequently used in field tests. The pseudo scent aids had moderate success in field tests, and the Odor pad aids had significant success. This research demonstrates that the STU-100 is a valuable tool for dog handlers and as a field instrument; however, modifications are warranted in order to improve its performance as a method for instrumental detection. Advisors/Committee Members: Kenneth Furton, Yong Cai, Stephan Rose, DeEtta Mills, David Chatfield.

Subjects/Keywords: human scent; human remains odor; scent collection; human odor; training aids; detector canines; human remains canines; Other Chemistry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

DeGreeff, L. E. (2010). Development of a Dynamic Headspace Concentration Technique for the Non-Contact Sampling of Human Odor Samples and the Creation of Canine Training Aids. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/291 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10120312 ; FI10120312

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

DeGreeff, Lauryn E. “Development of a Dynamic Headspace Concentration Technique for the Non-Contact Sampling of Human Odor Samples and the Creation of Canine Training Aids.” 2010. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed August 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/291 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10120312 ; FI10120312.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

DeGreeff, Lauryn E. “Development of a Dynamic Headspace Concentration Technique for the Non-Contact Sampling of Human Odor Samples and the Creation of Canine Training Aids.” 2010. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

DeGreeff LE. Development of a Dynamic Headspace Concentration Technique for the Non-Contact Sampling of Human Odor Samples and the Creation of Canine Training Aids. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2010. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/291 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10120312 ; FI10120312.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

DeGreeff LE. Development of a Dynamic Headspace Concentration Technique for the Non-Contact Sampling of Human Odor Samples and the Creation of Canine Training Aids. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2010. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/291 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10120312 ; FI10120312

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Virginia Tech

3. Rao, Sushma. Application of Human-computer Interaction Theories to Information Design on Internet Portals.

Degree: MS, Industrial and Systems Engineering, 2002, Virginia Tech

Internet portals are increasingly becoming a primary source of information. A portal is a gateway to information on the Internet or a hub from which users may locate relevant information (Strauss, 2000). Because university Web sites have various user classes, universities are beginning to adopt the portal concept for their Web sites. The study conducted aimed to determine the effect of tailoring information content and presentation style on a university Web portal. User ratings of information design on three metrics and user task performance measures of time and errors were compared for four prototypes. Three prototypes were built on the basis of user requirements and two Human-computer Interaction (HCI) theories and one was a replica of an existing academic information portal. The three metrics were derived from the HCI theories. The contributions of the study are a determination of user acceptance of and user performance with the tailored presentation styles and three metrics derived from HCI theories that can be used to compare alternative information presentation styles for portals. An important contribution is the remote data collection technique that was used in the study and a time-stamping technique that recorded clicks on hyperlinks. Advisors/Committee Members: Smith-Jackson, Tonya L. (committeechair), Williges, Robert C. (committee member), Scales, Glenda R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Information Foraging Theory; Human-computer Interaction; Web Information Design; Remote Data Collection; Information Scent; Internet Portals; HCI Theories

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rao, S. (2002). Application of Human-computer Interaction Theories to Information Design on Internet Portals. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/35756

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rao, Sushma. “Application of Human-computer Interaction Theories to Information Design on Internet Portals.” 2002. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed August 08, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/35756.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rao, Sushma. “Application of Human-computer Interaction Theories to Information Design on Internet Portals.” 2002. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Rao S. Application of Human-computer Interaction Theories to Information Design on Internet Portals. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2002. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/35756.

Council of Science Editors:

Rao S. Application of Human-computer Interaction Theories to Information Design on Internet Portals. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2002. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/35756

.