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You searched for subject:(sailfin mollies). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Loveless, Stephanie. The inheritance of morphological and behavioral differences in the mating signals of sailfin and shortfin mollies.

Degree: MS, Biological Sciences, 2008, Clemson University

Changes in mating signals often result in the development of new species, thus, understanding the genetic basis of traits that confer pre-mating reproductive isolation can shed light on the speciation process. This study used interspecific hybridization between poeciliid fish, a sailfin molly (Poecilia velifera) and a shortfin molly (P. mexicana), to generate reciprocal F1 and backcross hybrids to investigate patterns of inheritance of traits that contribute to mating signal differences between these two groups of mollies. The first part of my study focused on behavioral differences in the mating system of sailfin and shortfin mollies. I observed mating behaviors of males from the two parental species and males of, F1 and backcross generations from two Y-chromosome lines, the sailfin Y-line and the shortfin Y-line. For courtship displays, the mating behavior that separates sailfin from shortfin mollies, the pattern of inheritance showed both strong Y-linked effects as well as autosomal influences. There were no Y-linked effects on gonopodial thrusting behavior, a behavior common to both sailfin and shortfin mollies, and both species shows a similar pattern of autosomal inheritance. The second part of my study focused on morphological differences between sailfin and shortfin mollies and their relationship to mating behavior differences. Traits that best defined the two species were those associated with the dorsal fin (length of the dorsal fin, length of first fin ray, depth at mid-body, fin ray number), the gonopodium, and the caudal fin. A joint-scaling analysis showed that an additive model best explained inheritance of species differences in these morphological traits, but this model did not explain all of the variance observed. However, when comparing the relationship between species-specific morphological traits and mating behaviors, I found a positive relationship between dorsal fin size and courtship display rate, but no relationship between gonopodium length and gonopodial thrust rate. These results suggest that divergence between sailfin and shortfin mollies occurred as a result of genetic changes to both morphological and behavioral features of mating signals, which allowed for a switch from a mating system based primarily on male-male competition to one of male courtship and female cooperation. Advisors/Committee Members: Ptacek, Margaret B, Childress , Michael J, Bridges, Jr. , William C.

Subjects/Keywords: Inheritance of Behavior; Morphology; Pre-mating reporductive isolation; Sailfin Mollies; Shortfin Mollies; Zoology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Loveless, S. (2008). The inheritance of morphological and behavioral differences in the mating signals of sailfin and shortfin mollies. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/519

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Loveless, Stephanie. “The inheritance of morphological and behavioral differences in the mating signals of sailfin and shortfin mollies.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/519.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Loveless, Stephanie. “The inheritance of morphological and behavioral differences in the mating signals of sailfin and shortfin mollies.” 2008. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Loveless S. The inheritance of morphological and behavioral differences in the mating signals of sailfin and shortfin mollies. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2008. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/519.

Council of Science Editors:

Loveless S. The inheritance of morphological and behavioral differences in the mating signals of sailfin and shortfin mollies. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2008. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/519


Florida International University

2. Yanez, Tiffany N. The Effects of Copper Exposure on Fish Locomotion and Predator-Prey Interactions.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2018, Florida International University

This study determined the effects of the copper water quality criterion (WQC) by the EPA on [1] swimming performance and [2] predator-prey interactions of the Sailfin Molly, across a salinity gradient. Fish acclimated to FW (0 ppt) and 8-ppt saltwater were exposed to 11.3 and 8.44 µg/L Cu for 96 h, respectively. At the end of the exposures, fish swimming performance was determined by using the critical swimming speed, Ucrit, the speed at which a fish cannot longer maintain position in the water column. Ucritwas then measured again after a 4-week depuration period to determine if the fish were able to perform as well as control fish. Fish tissues were not analyzed for these experiments; therefore, the 4-week depuration period is hypothetical. In a separate study, mollies were presented with a predator model and isolated chemical cues of predation, then tested for predator avoidance behaviors. Copper exposures had opposite effects on visual and chemical cues. It was found that adverse effects of copper have the potential to harm fish populations. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Todd Crowl, Dr. Philip Stoddard, Dr. Gary Rand.

Subjects/Keywords: copper; behavior; swimming performance; metals; predator-prey interactions; Ucrit; locomotory; sailfin mollies; Behavior and Ethology; Laboratory and Basic Science Research; Marine Biology; Other Animal Sciences; Toxicology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yanez, T. N. (2018). The Effects of Copper Exposure on Fish Locomotion and Predator-Prey Interactions. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/4065 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC007697 ; FIDC007697

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yanez, Tiffany N. “The Effects of Copper Exposure on Fish Locomotion and Predator-Prey Interactions.” 2018. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/4065 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC007697 ; FIDC007697.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yanez, Tiffany N. “The Effects of Copper Exposure on Fish Locomotion and Predator-Prey Interactions.” 2018. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Yanez TN. The Effects of Copper Exposure on Fish Locomotion and Predator-Prey Interactions. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2018. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/4065 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC007697 ; FIDC007697.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Yanez TN. The Effects of Copper Exposure on Fish Locomotion and Predator-Prey Interactions. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/4065 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC007697 ; FIDC007697

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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