Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(sacoglossan). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Baumgartner, Finn. What makes Elysia viridis tick? Fitness consequences of diet selection and kleptoplasty.

Degree: 2013, University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet

Understanding the mechanisms involved in resource use by an organism is pivotal to understanding its ecology. A conspecific population that as a whole demonstrates a generalist pattern of resource use may in fact consist of relatively specialized individuals. Elysia viridis, a sacoglossan opisthobranch mollusc, tends to demonstrate this type of sympatric variation in diet, although to differing extents depending on the ontogenetic stage. However, the mechanisms underlying this inter-individual variation are poorly understood. Utilizing the basic framework of optimal diet theory, this thesis investigated the prevalence of individual specialization and its effects on energy assimilation in E. viridis on different algal diets and the mechanisms that underpin or constrain diet selection. This was assessed through a combination of laboratory experiments addressing how E. viridis’ original algal host affected algal diet choice, handling efficiency, growth, and the retention of functional chloroplasts (kleptoplasty) in the lab and relating conclusions from these experiments to observations of abundance and size of the sea slug in the study area. Assessments of abundance and size distributions of E. viridis on different algal hosts demonstrated that the sea slug commonly colonized the co-occuring algal species Codium fragile, Cladophora rupestris, and Cladophora sericea in the field. Abundance was generally highest on Cladophora hosts compared to C. fragile hosts, and C. rupestris tended to accommodate larger individuals compared to the other hosts (paper I). In the lab E. viridis tended to select algal diets that had a similar morphology (filamentous septate vs. planar siphonaceous) to their original host, which related to increased handling efficiency through previous experience of feeding techniques required for different algal morphologies. This indicated that short-term diet selection was influenced by differences in feeding efficiency, suggesting E. viridis were specialised to feed on particular diets. However, diet selection did not correlate to the long-term fitness value of a diet, indicating that factors other than nutrition are important for host/diet selection in E. viridis. However, positive growth by E. viridis on all algal diets irrespective of their original algal host indicated that slugs were capable of effectively switching to non-host algae (paper II). Furthermore, E. viridis derived functional kleptoplasts from three different genera of algae (Chaetomorpha, Codium, and Cladophora), refuting claims that members of Cladophorales were unsuitable sources of functional kleptoplasts to E. viridis (paper III). However, kleptoplast functionality varied within the genus Cladophora. Finally we provided evidence that E. viridis receives a substantial fitness benefit under satiation by retaining functional kleptoplasts through increased growth efficiency via phototrophy (paper IV). Overall this thesis contributes substantially to understanding the fitness trade-offs E. viridis faces through diet selection.…

Subjects/Keywords: Elysia viridis; sacoglossan; herbivore; macroalgae; seaweed; optimal diet theory; individual speciliasation; diet selection; kleptoplasty; phototrophy

…through grazing and phototrophy through kleptoplasts to sacoglossan energy budgets are largely… …x29;. Sacoglossan body morphology is variable and the order is generally divided into… …sympatric conspecific variation in resource use E. viridis is an unshelled sacoglossan that occurs… …sacoglossan species that has been relatively well studied in terms of its ecology (Jensen 1989… …Furthermore, it is one of the few sacoglossan species that consumes algae from a number of different… 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baumgartner, F. (2013). What makes Elysia viridis tick? Fitness consequences of diet selection and kleptoplasty. (Thesis). University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2077/32881

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baumgartner, Finn. “What makes Elysia viridis tick? Fitness consequences of diet selection and kleptoplasty.” 2013. Thesis, University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2077/32881.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baumgartner, Finn. “What makes Elysia viridis tick? Fitness consequences of diet selection and kleptoplasty.” 2013. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Baumgartner F. What makes Elysia viridis tick? Fitness consequences of diet selection and kleptoplasty. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet; 2013. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/32881.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Baumgartner F. What makes Elysia viridis tick? Fitness consequences of diet selection and kleptoplasty. [Thesis]. University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/32881

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of South Florida

2. Curtis, Nicholas E. The identification of functional, sequestered, symbiotic chloroplasts in Elysia clarki: A crucial step in the study of horizontally transferred, nuclear algal genes.

Degree: 2006, University of South Florida

A comparison of Elysia (=Tridachia) crispata (Mörch, 1863) from the Virgin Islands with elysiid slugs from the mangrove swamps and canals in the Florida Keys that have previously been identified as E. crispata reveals many differences in habitat, gross and microscopic anatomy, food preferences of juveniles, sources of symbiotic chloroplasts and their localization within the digestive tubules, radular morphology, and nucleic acid sequences of two genes. The differences between the two groups of slugs are such that the Florida Keys animals are considered to represent a new species, Elysia clarki. Elysia clarki feeds on siphonaceous algae, and intracellularly sequesters the chloroplasts, which actively photosynthesize for up to 4 months. We have determined the algal source of the chloroplasts in adult E. clarki from 2 populations in the Florida Keys, using molecular techniques, feeding experiments, and electron microscopy. Our results clearly demonstrate that adult E. clark i sequester chloroplasts from 7 different species of algae, representing two genera, of which 5 were identified; Penicillus lamourouxii, P. capitatus, Halimeda incrassata, H. monile, and Bryopsis pennata. In addition, chloroplasts from more than 1 species of algae are sequestered in the same digestive cell simultaneously. Phylogenetic analysis of rbcL sequences from the order Bryopsidales showed that E. clarki feeding was restricted to calcareous members of the family Udoteaceae and the family Bryopsidaceae. Feeding experiments were conducted, using individuals raised in the laboratory from egg masses laid by E. clarki adults which had been collected from Grassy Key, Florida, USA, and 29 species of macroalgae. For the first 14 d post-metamorphosis, juveniles ate only the thin filamentous coenocytes, Bryopsis plumosa or Derbesia tenuissima. Electron microscopy showed that the chloroplasts from both algae were sequestered intracellularly in juvenile slugs. Individuals offered any other macroalga, including the four calcareous species fed on by adults, did not feed on or incorporate any chloroplasts, and soon died. Juveniles switched from B. plumosa to P. capitatus at a length of ~ 1.0 cm, and fixed for microscopy 14 days later had intact intracellular chloroplasts from both algae.

Subjects/Keywords: Bryopsidales; Kleptoplasty; Sacoglossan; rbcL; Chloroplast symbiosis penicillus; Halimeda; Bryopsis; Derbesia; American Studies; Arts and Humanities

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Curtis, N. E. (2006). The identification of functional, sequestered, symbiotic chloroplasts in Elysia clarki: A crucial step in the study of horizontally transferred, nuclear algal genes. (Thesis). University of South Florida. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/2496

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Curtis, Nicholas E. “The identification of functional, sequestered, symbiotic chloroplasts in Elysia clarki: A crucial step in the study of horizontally transferred, nuclear algal genes.” 2006. Thesis, University of South Florida. Accessed September 24, 2020. https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/2496.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Curtis, Nicholas E. “The identification of functional, sequestered, symbiotic chloroplasts in Elysia clarki: A crucial step in the study of horizontally transferred, nuclear algal genes.” 2006. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Curtis NE. The identification of functional, sequestered, symbiotic chloroplasts in Elysia clarki: A crucial step in the study of horizontally transferred, nuclear algal genes. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2006. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/2496.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Curtis NE. The identification of functional, sequestered, symbiotic chloroplasts in Elysia clarki: A crucial step in the study of horizontally transferred, nuclear algal genes. [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2006. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/2496

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.