Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(roadside plantations). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Schaffers, A.P. Ecology of roadside plant communities.

Degree: 2000, Agricultural University

Roadside habitats nowadays contribute considerably to the amount of natural areas in the Netherlands. The ecological role of roadsides is recognized by the Dutch government and road authorities, and the interest in ecological management is growing. The study considers a cross-section of the more valuable plant communities occurring on Dutch road verges and investigates a large number of environmental factors. Aiming to provide an ecological framework that can be used as a reference for ecological management, the study presents an accurate synecological description of the studied syntaxa. An additional field experiment shows that large amounts of nutrients are lost from cuttings, already in the first few weeks after mowing. The effect of various hay removal delay times on the nutrient balance of the different communities is modelled. In most cases, cuttings should be removed within one week (or two at most) if the amounts of nutrients removed are to exceed the inputs through atmospheric deposition. Exploiting the unfertilized, semi-natural character of the sites and the wide range of conditions involved, the data are also used to detect and test general relationships. Investigating soil versus biomass relations it is shown that, over a wide environmental gradient, no simple relationship exists between the vegetation tissue concentration and soil availability of a nutrient (with the possible exception of K). Focussing on diversity, unimodal species richness relationships are identified for both maximum standing biomass and productivity, but these only explain a small part of the variation and are apparent only if soil factors are not considered. The "hump-shape" is more pronounced for standing biomass than for productivity, suggesting that competition for light is the key-factor. Particularly the numbers of rare and endangered species are curtailed strongly by high biomass values. Management affects species richness positively, but also this effect is apparent only if soil factors are not considered. To investigate the nature of Ellenberg indicator values, these are correlated to the measured soil and vegetation parameters. Soil pH is shown not to be adequately indicated by the so-called Ellenberg reaction values, but instead they properly reflect soil total calcium ( i.e. both exchangeable calcium and calcium in the form of carbonates). Ellenberg nitrogen values best indicate productivity. Ellenberg moisture values best indicate the average lowest soil moisture content, but they also provide an appropriate indication of the average annual groundwater level or alternatively the average spring groundwater level. Over the wide range of unfertilized conditions studied, in situ average annual N mineralization can be predicted well from a few directly measured soil parameters. The pool of mineral N just before the growing season is the best correlate. Together with moisture content and pH, this variable can explain 83.5% of the… Advisors/Committee Members: K.V. Sýkora, Frank Berendse.

Subjects/Keywords: wegbeplantingen; wegbermplanten; plantengemeenschappen; plantenecologie; Ecologie (algemeen); roadside plantations; roadside plants; plant communities; plant ecology; Ecology (General)

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schaffers, A. P. (2000). Ecology of roadside plant communities. (Doctoral Dissertation). Agricultural University. Retrieved from http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/66054 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-66054 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-66054 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/66054

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schaffers, A P. “Ecology of roadside plant communities.” 2000. Doctoral Dissertation, Agricultural University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/66054 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-66054 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-66054 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/66054.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schaffers, A P. “Ecology of roadside plant communities.” 2000. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Schaffers AP. Ecology of roadside plant communities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Agricultural University; 2000. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/66054 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-66054 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-66054 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/66054.

Council of Science Editors:

Schaffers AP. Ecology of roadside plant communities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Agricultural University; 2000. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/66054 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-66054 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-66054 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/66054

2. Keizer, P.J. The ecology of macromycetes in roadside verges planted with trees.

Degree: 1993, Agricultural University

In this thesis phytocoena and mycocoena of ectomycorrhizal fungi and saprotrophic fungi in roadside verges planted with trees are described independently. An attempt is made to indicate which environmental variables are most important in the distinguished communities. Parasitic fungi on trees, arthropods and other fungi and saprotrophic lignicolous species were not included in community definition. In roadside verges in the phytogeographical Drenthian district 76 plots were selected, 53 planted with Common Oak (Quercus robur; "Oak plots") and 23 with Beech ( Fagus sylvatica ; "Beech plots"). 12 beech plots were situated in an open landscape ("open") and 11 along roads inside forests ("shady"). These plots varied widely with regard to soil fertility. The oak plots were divided into 34 open plots, 10 shady plots and 9 "half-open" plots, i.e. bordered at one side by forest. In the open plots three age-classes were distinguished: 5 plots with young trees (up to 20 years old), 12 plots with middle aged trees (20 to 50 years old) and 17 with old trees (more than 50 years old). In the remaining plots old trees were present. In oak plots, too, there is a large variation regarding the soil fertility. Plots were always 100 in long, irrespective of the width of the verge and were selected on the basis of a sufficient lengthwise homogeneity of the phanerogam vegetation. A large number of environmental variables was measured. Vegetation relevés were made in 1987 according to the Braun-Blanquet method. For mycological purposes, the plots were visited during the autumns of 1986, '87 and '88 once every 3 to 4 weeks. All fungi were counted and identified. The data were processed with the aid of the computer programmes TWINSPAN for vegetation classifications and CANOCO for ordinations and correlations with environmental variables. In the beech plots 134 species of green plants, 105 species of ectomycorrhizal and 153 species of saprotrophic fungi were found. On the basis of the green plants two vegetation types could be recognized, one with open and one with shady plots. The former was divided into two subtypes, one with a poor and one with a semiruderal vegetation. Using the ectomycorrhizal fungi the plots were divided into a species poor and a species rich type with two subtypes. The former did not correspond with a vegetation type but the latter two subtypes corresponded to a limited extent with vegetation types. The two communities that were recognized among the saprotrophic fungi corresponded well with the vegetation types. The better correspondence of communities of vascular plants with those of saprotrophs than with those of ectomycorrhizal fungi indicates that plants and saprotrophs react more in the same way to the environmental factors than the ectomycorrhizal fungi. Environmental factors important for plants and saprotrophs are exposition of the plot, thickness of the organic layer, sodium… Advisors/Committee Members: R.A.A. Oldeman, E.J.M. Arnolds.

Subjects/Keywords: schimmels; mycologie; bosbouw; groene zones; heggen; plantenecologie; mycorrhizae; wegbeplantingen; wegbermplanten; fungi; mycology; forestry; green belts; hedges; plant ecology; mycorrhizas; roadside plantations; roadside plants

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Keizer, P. J. (1993). The ecology of macromycetes in roadside verges planted with trees. (Doctoral Dissertation). Agricultural University. Retrieved from http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/23516 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-23516 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-23516 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/23516

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keizer, P J. “The ecology of macromycetes in roadside verges planted with trees.” 1993. Doctoral Dissertation, Agricultural University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/23516 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-23516 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-23516 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/23516.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keizer, P J. “The ecology of macromycetes in roadside verges planted with trees.” 1993. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Keizer PJ. The ecology of macromycetes in roadside verges planted with trees. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Agricultural University; 1993. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/23516 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-23516 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-23516 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/23516.

Council of Science Editors:

Keizer PJ. The ecology of macromycetes in roadside verges planted with trees. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Agricultural University; 1993. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/23516 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-23516 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-23516 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/23516

3. Hoeks, J. Effect of leaking natural gas on soil and vegetation in urban areas.

Degree: 1972, Landbouwhogeschool Wageningen

<p/>Leakage of natural gas from the gas distribution system affects the physical, chemical and biological processes in the soil. Particularly the microbial oxidation of methane is then of predominant importance for the composition of the soil gas phase. The rate of methane oxidation was measured under varying conditions of gas phase composition, temperature and nutrient supply. Computation models were evolved with which it is possible to calculate the effect of these and other factors on the distribution of methane, oxygen and carbon dioxide around a leak. Experiments with actual and artificial leaks as well as the calculations showed that the extent of the gas zone largely depends on the leakage rate, the depth of the groundwater table, the soil moisture content and the extent of the pavement. The soil temperature also proved to have a significant influence by its effect on the microbial methane oxidation. At low temperatures this microbial process is limited and consequently the anaerobic zone, which is invariably present in summer, may then disappear completely, thus making the probability of injury to vegetation negligible in winter. After repair of the leak the poor aeration conditions in the soil may persist for quite a long time. This is caused by the high consumption rate of oxygen required for the oxidation of organic substances and reduced anorganic compounds accumulated in the soil during gas leakage. The oxygen overdemand and the oxidation rate were determined for various gassed soils. Measures can be taken to accellerate soil recovery processes and to improve conditions for regeneration of injured trees and before planting new trees. Both experiments and calculations with computation models proved that installation of open ventilation channels is very effective, even if the leak cannot be immediately repaired. So ventilation channels can also be installed as preventive measure. Advisors/Committee Members: G.H. Bolt.

Subjects/Keywords: biogas; oogstschade; schade; milieueffect; brandstoffen; koolwaterstoffen; methaan; aardgas; houtachtige planten als sierplanten; fysicochemische eigenschappen; plantenziekten; afwijkingen, planten; plantenziektekunde; plantenplagen; gewasbescherming; wegbeplantingen; wegbermplanten; bodemlucht; bodemchemie; bodemverontreiniging; bodemeigenschappen; bodemzoutgehalte; bodemkunde; bodemgiftigheid; Luchtverontreiniging; biogas; crop damage; damage; environmental impact; fuels; hydrocarbons; methane; natural gas; ornamental woody plants; physicochemical properties; plant diseases; plant disorders; plant pathology; plant pests; plant protection; roadside plantations; roadside plants; soil air; soil chemistry; soil pollution; soil properties; soil salinity; soil science; soil toxicity; Air Pollution

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hoeks, J. (1972). Effect of leaking natural gas on soil and vegetation in urban areas. (Doctoral Dissertation). Landbouwhogeschool Wageningen. Retrieved from http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/421723 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-421723 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-421723 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/421723

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hoeks, J. “Effect of leaking natural gas on soil and vegetation in urban areas.” 1972. Doctoral Dissertation, Landbouwhogeschool Wageningen. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/421723 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-421723 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-421723 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/421723.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hoeks, J. “Effect of leaking natural gas on soil and vegetation in urban areas.” 1972. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Hoeks J. Effect of leaking natural gas on soil and vegetation in urban areas. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Landbouwhogeschool Wageningen; 1972. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/421723 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-421723 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-421723 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/421723.

Council of Science Editors:

Hoeks J. Effect of leaking natural gas on soil and vegetation in urban areas. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Landbouwhogeschool Wageningen; 1972. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/421723 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-421723 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-421723 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/421723

.