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You searched for subject:(ribosomaal dna). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Hermes, Gerben. Mining the human intestinal microbiota for biomarkers associated with metabolic disorders.

Degree: 2016, Wageningen University

After birth, our gastrointestinal (GI) tract is colonized by a highly complex assemblage of microbes, collectively termed the GI microbiota, that develop intimate interactions with our body. Recent evidence indicates that the GI microbiota and its products may contribute to the development of obesity and related diseases. This, coupled with the current worldwide epidemic of obesity, has moved microbiome research into the spotlight of attention. Although the main cause of obesity and its associated metabolic complications is excess caloric intake compared with expenditure, differences in GI tract microbial ecology between individuals might be an important biomarker, mediator or even new therapeutic target. Nevertheless, it is currently still unclear which bacterial groups play a role in the development of the metabolic syndrome in humans. This might partly be explained by: 1. Biological factors such as the heterogeneity in genotype, lifestyle, diet; and the often complex aetiology of human disease of which the metabolic syndrome is no exception. 2. Technological factors, such as the use of miscellaneous incompatible methods to assess the gut microbiota, often enumerating specific groups rather than using broad 16S rRNA gene surveys or metagenomics. 3. Studies vary greatly in the populations considered, their designs, and the degree of control for potential confounding factors such as lifestyle and diet. Nevertheless, recent research on this matter has shown a conceptual shift by focusing on more homogenous subpopulations, based on stricter control over variables such age range or through the use of both anthropometric (weight, total body fat) as well as biochemical variables (insulin resistance, hyperlipidaemia) to define groups. Perturbations in microbial diversity and community structure in adults with overweight and obesity may be partly due to long-term dietary habits or physiological changes in these subjects. As such, exploring the association between the gut microbiota and variation in BMI and weight in early life, prior to or close to the onset of overweight, might provide additional insights into these processes. Therefore, we studied the fecal microbiota of 295 six-seven year old children from the KOALA Birth Cohort, living in the south of the Netherlands. This age range is relatively uncharted microbiota territory. We found that its composition seems to conform to tot same ecosystem rules as that of adults. The bimodal distribution pattern of several bacterial groups as well as their co-correlating groups that were reported previously, including Uncultured Clostridiales II (UCII), Prevotella spp. and Dialister were confirmed. Furthermore, one of the previously described bimodal groups (Uncultured Clostridiales I) was shown before to exhibit very clear shifting state probabilities associated with ageing, where the high abundance state was mainly observed above 40 years of age. This was corroborated as no support for bimodality of this group was observed in the children included in… Advisors/Committee Members: Wageningen University, Hauke Smidt, Erwin Zoetendal.

Subjects/Keywords: microbiota van het spijsverteringskanaal; stofwisselingsstoornissen; biomarkers; obesitas; darmmicro-organismen; antibiotica; dna-sequencing; rna; ribosomaal rna; Microbiologie (algemeen); gastrointestinal microbiota; metabolic disorders; biomarkers; obesity; intestinal microorganisms; antibiotics; dna sequencing; rna; ribosomal rna; Microbiology (General)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hermes, G. (2016). Mining the human intestinal microbiota for biomarkers associated with metabolic disorders. (Doctoral Dissertation). Wageningen University. Retrieved from http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/510350 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-510350 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-510350 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/510350

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hermes, Gerben. “Mining the human intestinal microbiota for biomarkers associated with metabolic disorders.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Wageningen University. Accessed January 21, 2020. http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/510350 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-510350 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-510350 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/510350.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hermes, Gerben. “Mining the human intestinal microbiota for biomarkers associated with metabolic disorders.” 2016. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Hermes G. Mining the human intestinal microbiota for biomarkers associated with metabolic disorders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Wageningen University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/510350 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-510350 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-510350 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/510350.

Council of Science Editors:

Hermes G. Mining the human intestinal microbiota for biomarkers associated with metabolic disorders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Wageningen University; 2016. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/510350 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-510350 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-510350 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/510350

2. Holterman, M.H.M. Phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Nematoda as revealed by ribosomal DNA, and their biological implications.

Degree: 2007, NARCIS

Nematodes – “eel worms”; members of the phylum Nematoda – can be considered as a success story within the Metazoa (multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes in which cells lack cell walls): they are speciose and – probably - the most numerous group of multicellular animals on our planet. Nematodes are present in virtually all terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats. Nematodes are trophically diverse; they may feed on bacteria, fungi/oomycetes, algae and protozoa, other nematodes or on a combination of these (omnivores), or live as facultative or obligatory parasites of plants or animals. As they are abundant, ubiquitous and occupy several trophic levels, they play an important role in the soil food web. Nematode parasites of animals affect billions of humans and livestock, while plant parasites such as cyst, root knot and lesion nematodes cause large agricultural losses worldwide. Despite their undisputed ecological and economical relevance, the systematics of the phylum Nematoda is far from established. One of the aims of this research was to further elucidate nematode phylogeny using molecular data. First a phylogenetic tree was constructed of 349 taxa, spanning the entire phylum Nematoda, on the basis of full length small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences. A series of mostly well-supported bifurcations defined twelve major clades, whereas the most basal clade was defined by representatives of the Enoplida and Triplonchida. Our analysis confirmed the paraphyly of the Adenophorea. Furthermore it was found that the SSU rDNA from representatives of the distal clades evolved at a higher rate than the SSU rDNA from the basal clades. In the meantime, a substantial number of sequences was added to our overall SSU rDNA nematode alignment - both public data (GenBank) and data generated by ourselves (≈ 1,500 sequences in total; February 2008). It is noted that the clade division as proposed in 2006 on the basis of “only” 349 taxa still seems to be valid. Subsequent research focused on three specific groups; Dorylaimia, Chromadoria and Tylenchomorpha. Within the suborder Dorylaimina, the SSU rDNA provided an exceptionally low phylogenetic signal, and - therefore – a part (≈ 1,000 bp) of the more variable large subunit ribosomal DNA (LSU rDNA) was analyzed. In most cases nematode relationships could be elucidated with good support, although some areas in the trees remained unresolved. Generally speaking the results of molecular phylogenetics corresponded fairly well with classical nematode taxonomy. The main exception was the order Dorylaimida where twelve subclades could be distinguished which bore little resemblance to classical taxonomy. Furthermore the suitability of ribosomal DNA for a (semi-) quantative molecular identification method was demonstrated using quantitative PCR (q-PCR) and primers designed to specifically amplify members of the order Mononchida and the potato cyst nematodes Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis. Plant parasitism has arisen several times within the phylum… Advisors/Committee Members: Wageningen University, Jaap Bakker, Hans Helder.

Subjects/Keywords: nematoda; ribosomaal dna; fylogenetica; klassering volgens erfelijke eigenschappen; fylogenie; plantenparasitaire nematoden; vrijlevende nematoden; dorylaimidae; chromadoridae; tylenchidae; zeenematoden; single nucleotide polymorphism; Landbouwkundige nematologie (algemeen); nematoda; ribosomal dna; phylogenetics; cladistics; phylogeny; plant parasitic nematodes; free living nematodes; dorylaimidae; chromadoridae; tylenchidae; marine nematodes; single nucleotide polymorphism; Agricultural Nematology (General)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Holterman, M. H. M. (2007). Phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Nematoda as revealed by ribosomal DNA, and their biological implications. (Doctoral Dissertation). NARCIS. Retrieved from http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/363576 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-363576 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-363576 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/363576

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Holterman, M H M. “Phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Nematoda as revealed by ribosomal DNA, and their biological implications.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, NARCIS. Accessed January 21, 2020. http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/363576 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-363576 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-363576 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/363576.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Holterman, M H M. “Phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Nematoda as revealed by ribosomal DNA, and their biological implications.” 2007. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Holterman MHM. Phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Nematoda as revealed by ribosomal DNA, and their biological implications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. NARCIS; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/363576 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-363576 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-363576 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/363576.

Council of Science Editors:

Holterman MHM. Phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Nematoda as revealed by ribosomal DNA, and their biological implications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. NARCIS; 2007. Available from: http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/363576 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-363576 ; urn:nbn:nl:ui:32-363576 ; http://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/363576

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