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You searched for subject:(retrosplenial cortex). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Canterbury

1. Rapley, Susan Ann. Identification of C-type Natriuretic Peptide as a novel target in age-related cognitive decline.

Degree: 2018, University of Canterbury

C-Type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP) is an important neuroendocrine regulator, suggested to be involved with cognitive decline and pathological aging. From the literature, and based on pilot work contributing to a Master’s Thesis, three questions were identified for investigation regarding a putative involvement of CNP in age-related cognitive decline. 1) Do CNP and its related signalling system vary in cerebral tissue during normal brain aging? 2) Could an involvement of CNP activity be identified in relation to a rodent model of spatial/episodic-like learning and memory? 3) What effects would administration of CNP have on rodent models of working, object and location recognition memory? During investigation of this final question, rodents were identified as cognitively impaired. Question one was addressed by housing aged rodents (23 months old) in an enriched environment, previously indicated as useful for modifying endogenous CNP expression and degradative regulation in young (8 to 9-month-old) rats. Response of CNP and related markers to this manipulation was markedly different in aged rats compared with young rodents. Data acquired indicated CNP synthesis and regulation to be dysfunctional within hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex during aging, identifying CNP as a novel target in age-related cognitive decline. A study using a radial arm maze task of spatial reference memory was designed to address question two. For rodents learning a spatial reference task, CNP synthesis was increased in retrosplenial cortex and mammillary bodies during memory consolidation. In a second group, interference was introduced to the reference memory component by use of a forced-arm choice, yoked to rodents learning the spatial reference memory task. Increases in CNP synthesis were restricted to mammillary bodies in this group. Rodents in both behaviourally trained groups and a third control group (accounting for effects of environmental conditions) had reduced CNP concentrations in hippocampus compared with previous reports, suggesting an effect of food-deprivation on central CNP activity. Findings provided the first indication that endogenous CNP activity is modified during spatial/episodic-like memory formation, commonly impaired in cognitive disorders. As working memory, object recognition and memory ‘pattern separation’ are impaired during cognitive decline, the final question was addressed by investigating effects of infused CNP in rodent models of each. A working memory task (radial arm maze) was negatively affected by behavioural outcomes of CNP infusion, resulting in inclusion of a rodent model testing anxiety (elevated plus maze). Object recognition was examined using a standard novel-object recognition paradigm, with pattern separation tested using a recent adaptation of spontaneous location recognition (Bekinschtein et al., 2014). Hypothesising that CNP would increase anxiety, decrease locomotion and interfere with recognition memory in a dose-dependent manner, doses ranging from 200 to 1000ng were administered…

Subjects/Keywords: C-type natriuretic peptide; CNP; NTproCNP; NPR-C receptor; aging; age-related cognitive decline; spatial memory; recognition memory; pattern separation; retrosplenial cortex; hippocampus; frontal cortex; rodents

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rapley, S. A. (2018). Identification of C-type Natriuretic Peptide as a novel target in age-related cognitive decline. (Thesis). University of Canterbury. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10092/16363

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rapley, Susan Ann. “Identification of C-type Natriuretic Peptide as a novel target in age-related cognitive decline.” 2018. Thesis, University of Canterbury. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10092/16363.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rapley, Susan Ann. “Identification of C-type Natriuretic Peptide as a novel target in age-related cognitive decline.” 2018. Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Rapley SA. Identification of C-type Natriuretic Peptide as a novel target in age-related cognitive decline. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/16363.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rapley SA. Identification of C-type Natriuretic Peptide as a novel target in age-related cognitive decline. [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/16363

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Canterbury

2. Espiner EA. Environmental Enrichment Elicits a Transient Rise of Bioactive C-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Young but Not Aged Rats.

Degree: 2018, University of Canterbury

Beneficial molecular and neuroplastic changes have been demonstrated in response to environmental enrichment (EE) in laboratory animals across the lifespan. Here, we investigated whether these effects extend to C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP), a widely expressed neuropeptide with putative involvement in neuroprotection, neuroplasticity, anxiety, and learning and memory. We determined the CNP response in 36 young (8–9 months) and 36 aged (22–23 months) male PVGc hooded rats that were rehoused with new cage mates in either standard laboratory cages or EE for periods of 14 or 28 days. Tissues were rapidly excised from four brain regions associated with memory formation (dorsal hippocampus, retrosplenial cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and mammillary bodies) plus the occipital cortex and hypothalamus, and immediately frozen. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure bioactive CNP and the amino-terminal fragment of proCNP, NTproCNP. Because CNP but not NTproCNP is rapidly degraded at source, NTproCNP reflects CNP production whereas the ratio NTproCNP:CNP is a biomarker of CNP’s local degradation rate. EE increased CNP at 14 days in all brain regions in young, but not old rats; this effect in young rats was lost at 28 days in all regions of interest. NTproCNP:CNP ratio, but not NTproCNP, was reduced in all regions by EE at 14 days in young rats, but not in old rats, which suggests a period of reduced degradation or receptor mediated clearance, rather than increased production of CNP in these young EE rats. Aged rats tended to show reduced NTproCNP:CNP ratios but this did not occur in dorsal hippocampus or mammillary bodies. This is the first study demonstrating modulation of CNP protein concentrations, and the effect of age, in response to environmental stimulation. Furthermore, it is the first to show that changes in degradation rate in vivo may be an important component in determining CNP bioactivity in neural tissues.

Subjects/Keywords: C-type natriuretic peptide; environmental enrichment; medial prefrontal cortex; aging; hippocampus; retrosplenial cortex; Field of Research::17 - Psychology and Cognitive Sciences::1701 - Psychology::170101 - Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology); Field of Research::17 - Psychology and Cognitive Sciences::1701 - Psychology::170102 - Developmental Psychology and Ageing; Field of Research::11 - Medical and Health Sciences::1109 - Neurosciences::110904 - Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

EA, E. (2018). Environmental Enrichment Elicits a Transient Rise of Bioactive C-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Young but Not Aged Rats. (Thesis). University of Canterbury. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10092/15845

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

EA, Espiner. “Environmental Enrichment Elicits a Transient Rise of Bioactive C-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Young but Not Aged Rats.” 2018. Thesis, University of Canterbury. Accessed December 11, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10092/15845.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

EA, Espiner. “Environmental Enrichment Elicits a Transient Rise of Bioactive C-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Young but Not Aged Rats.” 2018. Web. 11 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

EA E. Environmental Enrichment Elicits a Transient Rise of Bioactive C-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Young but Not Aged Rats. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/15845.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

EA E. Environmental Enrichment Elicits a Transient Rise of Bioactive C-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Young but Not Aged Rats. [Thesis]. University of Canterbury; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/15845

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.