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Temple University

1. Martin, Jason. Marketizing the Arts: The Effect of Marketized Revenues on Constituency Size and Composition.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Temple University

Sociology

The nonprofit arts and culture sector in the United States is uniquely situated in tension between its not-for-profit status and its growing role as a catalyst for regional economic growth. Since the mid-20th century, for metropolitan areas in particular, these organizations have become an integral part of local economies and visible symbols of regions as robust cultural centers. Their growth is increasingly viewed as a significant contribution to regional economic development. But concomitant with their newly defined roles as regional "economic engines," nonprofit arts and culture organizations also are increasingly pressed to adopt a "market orientation" with respect to both their audiences and funders. This dissertation is an investigation into how these changes have shaped the organizational structures and processes of the sector. The guiding inquiry of this research is how an increased "market orientation" in the sector is affecting organizational operations (especially expenditures), and ultimately, their constituencies. More specifically, this analysis explores the effects of marketization, defined here as dependence on earned income, agenda-oriented local corporate sponsorship, and outcomes-based foundation support, on organizational expenditures and constituency levels and composition. The present research assesses the relative utility of three organizational growth theories- resource dependency theory, institutional theory, and urban growth agenda theory-on the one hand, and the "crowding-out" hypothesis on the other hand, in accounting for the effects of increasing marketization on the size and composition of organizational constituencies. The first three frameworks suggest a connection between marketized revenues and the prioritization of organizational visibility and legitimacy, organizational professionalization, and production quality, with the end goal of constituency growth. On the other hand, the crowding-out hypothesis, though it retains a focus on revenue sources, suggests that revenue from certain sources may lead to the stagnation or even reduction of deeper organizational affiliations such as membership. Specifically, the perspective suggests that a heightened market orientation conflicts with a not-for-profit or philanthropic orientation, thereby "crowding-out" potential members. The tension between these theoretical perspectives reflects the lack of solid empirical evidence regarding the effects of economic inputs (particularly those tied to marketization) on organizational outcomes (particularly constituency composition). The current research hypothesizes that marketized revenues will ultimately lead to audience growth and expansion while simultaneously leading to stagnation or decline in membership. This study focuses on museums and performing arts institutions located within the Pennsylvania portion of the Greater Philadelphia Area. The analysis utilizes survey data on revenues, expenditures, and other organizational characteristics collected on a continuing basis through the…

Advisors/Committee Members: Elesh, David, Zhao, Shanyang, Bartelt, David, Adams, Carolyn Teich.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Organizational behavior; Cultural resources management; arts and culture; crowding out; nonprofit; organizations; resource allotment; structural equation modeling

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Martin, J. (2013). Marketizing the Arts: The Effect of Marketized Revenues on Constituency Size and Composition. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214823

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martin, Jason. “Marketizing the Arts: The Effect of Marketized Revenues on Constituency Size and Composition.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214823.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martin, Jason. “Marketizing the Arts: The Effect of Marketized Revenues on Constituency Size and Composition.” 2013. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Martin J. Marketizing the Arts: The Effect of Marketized Revenues on Constituency Size and Composition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214823.

Council of Science Editors:

Martin J. Marketizing the Arts: The Effect of Marketized Revenues on Constituency Size and Composition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2013. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,214823

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