Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(rearticulation). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Colorado

1. Hartzell, Stephanie Lorraine. Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2017, University of Colorado

This critical rhetorical analysis interrogates contemporary public discourse on race and racism in a post-2012 U.S. American context characterized by proliferating consciousness and the waning hegemony of a colorblind racial ideology. Focusing on three overarching formations of whiteness—white nationalism, alt-right, and anti-racist whiteness—I investigate how efforts to raise white racial consciousness are rhetorically constructed and mobilized to hail an audience of everyday white U.S. Americans. Positioning themselves in opposition to a colorblind racial ideology and alternative orientations to racial consciousness, these discursive formations of whiteness work strategically against one another as they negotiate dominant affective circulations and push against normative expectations for race evasive discourse in the mainstream public sphere. My analysis demonstrates that as they work to move everyday white folks from a colorblind racial ideology toward racial consciousness, white nationalist, alt-right, and white anti-racist rhetorics each strategically negotiate colorblind common sense, mainstream discursive expectations for race evasion, and the normative affective circulation of white fragility by rearticulating more extreme formations of racial consciousness into rhetorical formations more palatable to mainstream audiences. In this way, I argue, the discursive formations of whiteness interrogated here are constructed as rhetorical bridges between colorblindness and racial consciousness. Advisors/Committee Members: Lisa A. Flores, Karen Ashcraft, Emma Pérez, Phaedra Pezzullo, Peter Simonson.

Subjects/Keywords: anti-racism; colorblindness; critical rhetoric; racism; rearticulation; whiteness; Applied Ethics; Communication; Rhetoric

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hartzell, S. L. (2017). Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/75

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hartzell, Stephanie Lorraine. “Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed October 16, 2019. https://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/75.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hartzell, Stephanie Lorraine. “Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse.” 2017. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hartzell SL. Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/75.

Council of Science Editors:

Hartzell SL. Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2017. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/75


University of Colorado

2. Hartzell, Stephanie Lorraine. Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Colorado

This critical rhetorical analysis interrogates contemporary public discourse on race and racism in a post-2012 U.S. American context characterized by proliferating consciousness and the waning hegemony of a colorblind racial ideology. Focusing on three overarching formations of whiteness—white nationalism, alt-right, and anti-racist whiteness—I investigate how efforts to raise white racial consciousness are rhetorically constructed and mobilized to hail an audience of everyday white U.S. Americans. Positioning themselves in opposition to a colorblind racial ideology and alternative orientations to racial consciousness, these discursive formations of whiteness work strategically against one another as they negotiate dominant affective circulations and push against normative expectations for race evasive discourse in the mainstream public sphere. My analysis demonstrates that as they work to move everyday white folks from a colorblind racial ideology toward racial consciousness, white nationalist, alt-right, and white anti-racist rhetorics each strategically negotiate colorblind common sense, mainstream discursive expectations for race evasion, and the normative affective circulation of white fragility by rearticulating more extreme formations of racial consciousness into rhetorical formations more palatable to mainstream audiences. In this way, I argue, the discursive formations of whiteness interrogated here are constructed as rhetorical bridges between colorblindness and racial consciousness. Advisors/Committee Members: Lisa A. Flores, Karen Ashcraft, Emma Pérez, Phaedra Pezzullo, Peter Simonson.

Subjects/Keywords: anti-racism; colorblindness; critical rhetoric; racism; rearticulation; whiteness; Communication; Ethnic Studies; Rhetoric

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hartzell, S. L. (2017). Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/86

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hartzell, Stephanie Lorraine. “Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Colorado. Accessed October 16, 2019. https://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/86.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hartzell, Stephanie Lorraine. “Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse.” 2017. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hartzell SL. Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/86.

Council of Science Editors:

Hartzell SL. Everyday (Anti)-Racism: Rhetorical Formations of White Racial Consciousness in Contemporary Public Discourse. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Colorado; 2017. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/comm_gradetds/86

3. Taylor, Taura. Coloring Outside The Lines: An Intersectionality Approach To Understanding The Homeschooling Experiences of Black Families.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2013, Georgia State University

Current data suggest that homeschooling is a diverse and growing social movement. Unfortunately, the homeschooling narrative reflected in research is often skewed by the socioeconomic status, political power, and cultural interests of White, two-parent, middle-class, homeschooling households, marginalizing the experiences of a growing population of Black homeschoolers. Considering that the plausibility of homeschooling is dependent upon access to social, economic, and temporal resources, this study examines the resources that Black families identified as substantive to sustain their homeschooling efforts. Relying on 20 in-depth interviews, I utilized the theoretical frames of symbolic interactionism, cognitive sociology, and intersectionality and the coding procedures of grounded theory methods to analyze the narratives of Black homeschooling parents. Ultimately, I found the metaphor of coloring outside the lines to be a fitting representation for Black families resourcefulness in homeschooling. In addition, I introduce complicit privilege and rearticulated license—the mechanisms through which Black families navigated stratifications. Advisors/Committee Members: Ralph LaRossa, Tomeka M. Davis, Anthony Hatch.

Subjects/Keywords: Homeschooling; Intersectionality; Black American Families; Rearticulation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, T. (2013). Coloring Outside The Lines: An Intersectionality Approach To Understanding The Homeschooling Experiences of Black Families. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/36

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, Taura. “Coloring Outside The Lines: An Intersectionality Approach To Understanding The Homeschooling Experiences of Black Families.” 2013. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed October 16, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/36.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, Taura. “Coloring Outside The Lines: An Intersectionality Approach To Understanding The Homeschooling Experiences of Black Families.” 2013. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Taylor T. Coloring Outside The Lines: An Intersectionality Approach To Understanding The Homeschooling Experiences of Black Families. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/36.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor T. Coloring Outside The Lines: An Intersectionality Approach To Understanding The Homeschooling Experiences of Black Families. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2013. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/sociology_theses/36

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.