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You searched for subject:(radar ornithology). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Oklahoma

1. Horton, Kyle. USING RADAR TO REVEAL LARGE-SCALE IN-FLIGHT BEHAVIORS OF MIGRATORY BIRDS.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Oklahoma

The shortest possible migratory route for birds is not always the best route to travel. Substantial research effort has established that birds in captivity are capable of orienting toward the direction of an intended goal, but efforts to examine how free-living birds use navigational information under conditions that potentially make direct flight toward that goal inefficient have been limited in spatiotemporal scales and in the number of individuals observed because of logistical and technological limitations. Using novel and recently developed techniques for analysis of Doppler polarimetric weather surveillance radar data, I examine in-flight behaviors employed by migratory birds as they transition to and from their wintering and breeding grounds. I explore regional, seasonal, altitudinal, and latitudinal dependencies on how migrants utilize and cope with winds aloft. Advisors/Committee Members: Jeffrey, Kelly (advisor), Michael, Patten (committee member), Phillip, Chilson (committee member), Jeffrey, Buler (committee member), Eli, Bridge (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: aeroecology; bird migration; radar ornithology; wind drift

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Horton, K. (2017). USING RADAR TO REVEAL LARGE-SCALE IN-FLIGHT BEHAVIORS OF MIGRATORY BIRDS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/50744

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Horton, Kyle. “USING RADAR TO REVEAL LARGE-SCALE IN-FLIGHT BEHAVIORS OF MIGRATORY BIRDS.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed December 13, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/50744.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Horton, Kyle. “USING RADAR TO REVEAL LARGE-SCALE IN-FLIGHT BEHAVIORS OF MIGRATORY BIRDS.” 2017. Web. 13 Dec 2018.

Vancouver:

Horton K. USING RADAR TO REVEAL LARGE-SCALE IN-FLIGHT BEHAVIORS OF MIGRATORY BIRDS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2017. [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/50744.

Council of Science Editors:

Horton K. USING RADAR TO REVEAL LARGE-SCALE IN-FLIGHT BEHAVIORS OF MIGRATORY BIRDS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/50744


Montana State University

2. Mead, Reginald Marshall. A system for automating identification of biological echoes in NEXRAD level II radar data.

Degree: College of Engineering, 2009, Montana State University

Since its inception in the mid twentieth century, radar ornithology has provided scientists with new tools for studying the behavior of birds, especially with regards to migration. A number of studies have shown that birds can be detected using a wide variety of radar devices. Generally, these studies have focused on small portable radars that typically have a finer resolution than large weather surveillance radars. Recently, however, a number of researchers have presented qualitative evidence suggesting that birds, or at least migration events, can be identified using large broad scale radars such as the WSR-88D used in the NEXRAD weather surveillance system. This is potentially a boon for ornithologists because NEXRAD data covers a large portion of the country, is constantly being produced, is freely available, and is archived back into the early 1990s. A major obstacle is that identifying birds in NEXRAD data currently requires having a trained technician manually inspect a graphically rendered radar sweep. The immense amount of available data makes manual classification of radar echoes infeasible over any practical span of space or time. In this thesis, a system is presented for automating this process using machine learning techniques. This approach begins with classified training data that has been interpreted by experts or collected from direct observations. The data is preprocessed to ensure quality and to emphasize relevant features. A classifier is then trained using this data and cross validation is used to measure performance. The experiments in this thesis compare neural network, naïve Bayes, and k-nearest neighbor classifiers. Empirical evidence is provided showing that this system can achieve classification accuracies in the 80th to 90th percentile. Advisors/Committee Members: Chairperson, Graduate Committee: John Paxton. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Artificial intelligence Computer programs.; Radar in ornithology.; Birds Migration.; Radar meteorology.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mead, R. M. (2009). A system for automating identification of biological echoes in NEXRAD level II radar data. (Thesis). Montana State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1848

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mead, Reginald Marshall. “A system for automating identification of biological echoes in NEXRAD level II radar data.” 2009. Thesis, Montana State University. Accessed December 13, 2018. https://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1848.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mead, Reginald Marshall. “A system for automating identification of biological echoes in NEXRAD level II radar data.” 2009. Web. 13 Dec 2018.

Vancouver:

Mead RM. A system for automating identification of biological echoes in NEXRAD level II radar data. [Internet] [Thesis]. Montana State University; 2009. [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: https://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1848.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mead RM. A system for automating identification of biological echoes in NEXRAD level II radar data. [Thesis]. Montana State University; 2009. Available from: https://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1848

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Gesicki, David V. The Influence of Topography, Wind, and Time of Night on Migratory Songbird Orientation along the Southwest Coast of Lake Erie.

Degree: PhD, Biological Sciences, 2018, Bowling Green State University

Many long-distance migratory songbirds encounter geographic barriers at some point during their annual migrations. Bird migration routes often follow detours where passages across ecological barriers are either avoided entirely or reduced in extent. Numerous early reports of broad front migration crossing coastlines seemingly without taking notice of the transition from land to water contradict more recent observations suggesting important deviations from the standard broad front direction associated with the underlying topography, in particular, the course of coastlines. However, whether and under what conditions nocturnally migrating songbirds would respond to a more modest obstacle such the Great Lakes is less well understood. I used a combination of weather surveillance radar and thermal imaging cameras to capture the direction of spring migration both regionally, as migrants are approaching the southern shore of Lake Erie, and locally along the coast. In the present body of work, I have studied (1) the nocturnal migratory orientation of birds along the southwest coast of Lake Erie during the spring migratory season, (2) the orientation of migrants with respect to the prevailing winds, and (3) the orientation with respect to time of night, which presumably is reflective of differences in the energetic condition of migrants. Along the southwest coast of Lake Erie, the direction of migration differed significantly from the broad front direction approaching Lake Erie, and the probability of a migrant deviating from the broad front direction was higher at sites which presented southeast-northwest oriented coastlines (Cedar Point and Ottawa NWR). Even under energetically favorable winds above Cedar Point and Ottawa some migrants were observed detouring the Lake, and migration in crosswinds increased the likelihood of either coastal flights in easterly winds or crossing flights in westerly winds. Migrants approaching the shore above Ottawa showed a significant increase in the percent of flight bearings deviating along the coast late in the night compared to early in the night, possibly reflective of a decline in motivation to cross as energetic stores become depleted during the night. Migrants approaching the southern shore above Maumee Bay, an east-west oriented coastline, were more consistent with observations made inland, away from any presumptive effects of the coast, and made a Lake crossing regardless of winds aloft or time of night. As a whole, the present dissertation expands the scientific understanding of the phenomenon of coastal migration in the context of an understudied system, the Great Lakes, and in particular Lake Erie. Advisors/Committee Members: Bingman, Verner (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Zoology; Ecology; Biology; Ecology; Ornithology; Bird Migration; Radar Ornithology; Nocturnal Migration; Orientation; Topographical Barrier; Migratory Obstacles; Lake Erie; Coastlines

…conducted via surveillance radar showed no discernable change in the track direction of migratory… …surveillance radar technology was low resolution and unlikely able to detect some birds of the… …x28;2014), using tracking radar at the same site, found no clear effect of the coastline on… …Mediterranean coast, and marine radar data collected along the Lake Erie coast of Ohio similarly… …Although radar and telemetry studies have revealed that large numbers of migratory birds cross… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gesicki, D. V. (2018). The Influence of Topography, Wind, and Time of Night on Migratory Songbird Orientation along the Southwest Coast of Lake Erie. (Doctoral Dissertation). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu152845051093791

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gesicki, David V. “The Influence of Topography, Wind, and Time of Night on Migratory Songbird Orientation along the Southwest Coast of Lake Erie.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Bowling Green State University. Accessed December 13, 2018. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu152845051093791.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gesicki, David V. “The Influence of Topography, Wind, and Time of Night on Migratory Songbird Orientation along the Southwest Coast of Lake Erie.” 2018. Web. 13 Dec 2018.

Vancouver:

Gesicki DV. The Influence of Topography, Wind, and Time of Night on Migratory Songbird Orientation along the Southwest Coast of Lake Erie. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2018. [cited 2018 Dec 13]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu152845051093791.

Council of Science Editors:

Gesicki DV. The Influence of Topography, Wind, and Time of Night on Migratory Songbird Orientation along the Southwest Coast of Lake Erie. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu152845051093791

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