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You searched for subject:(quick response research). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Texas

1. Gupta, Kailash. Seeking Information After the 2010 Haiti Earthquake: a Case Study in Mass-fatality Management.

Degree: 2013, University of North Texas

The 2010 earthquake in Haiti, which killed an estimated 316,000 people, offered many lessons in mass-fatality management (MFM). The dissertation defined MFM in seeking information and in recovery, preservation, identification, and disposition of human remains. Specifically, it examined how mass fatalities were managed in Haiti, how affected individuals sought information about fatalities, and what needs motivated them. Data from 28 in-depth, partially structured interviews, conducted during two field visits ending 21 weeks after the earthquake, were included in a case study. The data analysis revealed the MFM was severely inadequate. One interviewee, a senior UN official, stated, "There was no fatality management." The analysis also indicated a need to learn whereabouts of the deceased motivated individuals to visit spots the deceased were last seen at. It sought to illumine information-seeking practices, as discussed in the works of J. David Johnson and others, by developing a new model of information flow in MFM. In addition, it reaffirmed Donald Case and Thomas Wilson's theoretical proposition – that need guides any seeking of information – in the case of Haiti. Finally, it produced recommendations regarding future directions in MFM for emergency managers and information scientists, including possible use of unidentified body parts in organ transplants. Overall, the dissertation, which was supported by two grants of the National Science Foundation, attempted to add to relatively scanty literature in information seeking in MFM. Advisors/Committee Members: Moro, Nikhil, Cleveland, Ana, Oyarce, Guillermo.

Subjects/Keywords: Mass-fatality management; Haiti; earthquake; information science; information seeking; information need; disaster management; emergency management; Zeigarnik effect; case study; quick response research

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gupta, K. (2013). Seeking Information After the 2010 Haiti Earthquake: a Case Study in Mass-fatality Management. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271823/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gupta, Kailash. “Seeking Information After the 2010 Haiti Earthquake: a Case Study in Mass-fatality Management.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed April 03, 2020. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271823/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gupta, Kailash. “Seeking Information After the 2010 Haiti Earthquake: a Case Study in Mass-fatality Management.” 2013. Web. 03 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Gupta K. Seeking Information After the 2010 Haiti Earthquake: a Case Study in Mass-fatality Management. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2013. [cited 2020 Apr 03]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271823/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gupta K. Seeking Information After the 2010 Haiti Earthquake: a Case Study in Mass-fatality Management. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2013. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271823/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Pretoria

2. Struik, Melony. The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women.

Degree: Psychology, 2012, University of Pretoria

Postpartum depression is an illness that is frequently unreported and undetected for a variety of reasons and may be potentially devastating for the mother affected as well as her family. Routine screening of postpartum women enables health practitioners to detect symptoms of PPD early and provides an opportunity for early intervention which may improve the outcome and increase the mother’s chances of an earlier recovery. It is therefore important that reliable and convenient screening tools are available to health practitioners who have contact with postpartum women. The primary objective of this research was to make an Afrikaans version of an existing screening scale available – the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS), designed specifically to encompass the multifaceted phenomenon of PPD. In accordance with this objective, the validity and reliability of the PDSS and its Afrikaans version was investigated in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African mothers. A further objective of this study was to compare the performance of the PDSS with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-SR16). Various factors have been reported to be associated with the development of PPD. The final objective of this study was to explore the relationship between known risk factors for PPD and high scores on the PDSS amongst women in South African. A total of 365 South African mothers, between 4 and 16 weeks postpartum participated in this study. English-speaking mothers (n = 187) completed the PDSS, EPDS, QIDS, and a demographic and psychosocial questionnaire, while Afrikaans speaking mothers (n = 178) completed the respective Afrikaans versions of these questionnaires. A multiple translation method – Brislin’s back-translation method and the committee approach – was used to translate the PDSS and the QIDS into Afrikaans. An item response theory (IRT), Rasch analysis, was used to examine dimensionality, item difficulty, differential item functioning, and category functioning of the PDSS and the Afrikaans PDSS. Results reveal excellent person reliability estimates for the Afrikaans PDSS as well as for the PDSS in a South African sample. Both language versions performed reasonably well and the majority of items in the PDSS dimensions and the Afrikaans PDSS dimensions demonstrated fit statistics that supported the underlying constructs of each dimension. Some items were identified as problematic, namely Item 2, Item 25, Item 28, and Item 30. The item person construct maps show reasonably good spread of items. There were, however, persons that scored higher than the items could measure and an overrepresentation of items at the mean level. The Likert response categories proved to be effective for all the Afrikaans PDSS items and almost all the PDSS items. Results indicate that 49.7% of mothers screened positive for major PPD using the PDSS. A further 17.3% of mothers obtained scores indicating the presence of significant symptoms of PPD. Statistically significant… Advisors/Committee Members: Prof D J F Maree (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Quick inventory of depressive symptomatology; Item response theory; Rasch analysis; Multiple regression analysis; Risk factors; Afrikaans; Translation; Adaptation; Cross-cultural research; Edinburgh postnatal depression scale; Postpartum depression; Screening; Postpartum depression screening scale; UCTD

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Struik, M. (2012). The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2263/25576

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Struik, Melony. “The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pretoria. Accessed April 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2263/25576.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Struik, Melony. “The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women.” 2012. Web. 03 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Struik M. The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Pretoria; 2012. [cited 2020 Apr 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/25576.

Council of Science Editors:

Struik M. The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Pretoria; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/25576


University of Pretoria

3. [No author]. The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women .

Degree: 2012, University of Pretoria

Postpartum depression is an illness that is frequently unreported and undetected for a variety of reasons and may be potentially devastating for the mother affected as well as her family. Routine screening of postpartum women enables health practitioners to detect symptoms of PPD early and provides an opportunity for early intervention which may improve the outcome and increase the mother’s chances of an earlier recovery. It is therefore important that reliable and convenient screening tools are available to health practitioners who have contact with postpartum women. The primary objective of this research was to make an Afrikaans version of an existing screening scale available – the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS), designed specifically to encompass the multifaceted phenomenon of PPD. In accordance with this objective, the validity and reliability of the PDSS and its Afrikaans version was investigated in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African mothers. A further objective of this study was to compare the performance of the PDSS with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-SR16). Various factors have been reported to be associated with the development of PPD. The final objective of this study was to explore the relationship between known risk factors for PPD and high scores on the PDSS amongst women in South African. A total of 365 South African mothers, between 4 and 16 weeks postpartum participated in this study. English-speaking mothers (n = 187) completed the PDSS, EPDS, QIDS, and a demographic and psychosocial questionnaire, while Afrikaans speaking mothers (n = 178) completed the respective Afrikaans versions of these questionnaires. A multiple translation method – Brislin’s back-translation method and the committee approach – was used to translate the PDSS and the QIDS into Afrikaans. An item response theory (IRT), Rasch analysis, was used to examine dimensionality, item difficulty, differential item functioning, and category functioning of the PDSS and the Afrikaans PDSS. Results reveal excellent person reliability estimates for the Afrikaans PDSS as well as for the PDSS in a South African sample. Both language versions performed reasonably well and the majority of items in the PDSS dimensions and the Afrikaans PDSS dimensions demonstrated fit statistics that supported the underlying constructs of each dimension. Some items were identified as problematic, namely Item 2, Item 25, Item 28, and Item 30. The item person construct maps show reasonably good spread of items. There were, however, persons that scored higher than the items could measure and an overrepresentation of items at the mean level. The Likert response categories proved to be effective for all the Afrikaans PDSS items and almost all the PDSS items. Results indicate that 49.7% of mothers screened positive for major PPD using the PDSS. A further 17.3% of mothers obtained scores indicating the presence of significant symptoms of PPD. Statistically significant… Advisors/Committee Members: Prof D J F Maree (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Quick inventory of depressive symptomatology; Item response theory; Rasch analysis; Multiple regression analysis; Risk factors; Afrikaans; Translation; Adaptation; Cross-cultural research; Edinburgh postnatal depression scale; Postpartum depression; Screening; Postpartum depression screening scale; UCTD

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

author], [. (2012). The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-06162012-173414/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

author], [No. “The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women .” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pretoria. Accessed April 03, 2020. http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-06162012-173414/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

author], [No. “The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women .” 2012. Web. 03 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

author] [. The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Pretoria; 2012. [cited 2020 Apr 03]. Available from: http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-06162012-173414/.

Council of Science Editors:

author] [. The translation and validation of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) : towards improving screening for postpartum depression in English- and Afrikaans-speaking South African women . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Pretoria; 2012. Available from: http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-06162012-173414/

.