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You searched for subject:(prosocial messaging). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Bowling Green State University

1. Lister, Kelly M. Aggression and Prosocial Behavior in Adolescents' Internet and Face-To-Face Interactions.

Degree: MA, Psychology/Clinical, 2007, Bowling Green State University

In the last decade, computer-mediated communication (CMC) has increased dramatically as a format for social interaction, particularly among adolescents. Despite this increase, little research has focused on the types of behaviors occurring in CMC. The purpose of this study was to address questions regarding adolescents’ CMC use (specifically ratings of use of instant messaging and blogging, and aggressive and prosocial behaviors engaged in while online), the relation between CMC behaviors and face-to-face behaviors, and the relation between ratings of use and both CMC and face-to-face behaviors. Participants were 484 7th, 9th, and 11th grade students who completed a survey about their CMC use and online and face-to-face aggressive and prosocial behaviors as agents and recipients of those behaviors. Most adolescents reported engaging in some form of CMC at least a few times a week. Females reported a higher rate of CMC use than males. Adolescents reported engaging in more online prosocial behavior than online aggression and endorsed being the agents of online behaviors more so than being the recipients. Males and females were similar in their reports of online aggression but females were higher in online prosocial behaviors. Engaging in online aggression and prosocial behaviors was related to engaging in corresponding face-to-face behaviors. Adolescents reported being agents of prosocial behavior and recipients of aggression and prosocial behavior more when face-to-face than when online. Seventh-grade males reported the highest rates of being recipients of aggression, across contexts. Eleventh-graders reported being the recipients of prosocial behavior less than 7th and 9th graders. Adolescents’ CMC use was related to all online behaviors and to face-to-face prosocial behaviors. CMC use predicted adolescents’ online behaviors above and beyond their face-to-face behaviors. Limitations of this survey study included limited generalizability of results because of the age and ethnic distributions of the sample and the lack of longitudinal data, which precludes conclusions about temporal directions of effects. Finally, important implications, such as parental supervision of online behaviors, and ideas for future studies were discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dubow, Eric (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology, Clinical; aggression; aggressive; prosocial behavior; computer-mediated communication; internet; instant messaging; IM; blogging; face-to-face

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lister, K. M. (2007). Aggression and Prosocial Behavior in Adolescents' Internet and Face-To-Face Interactions. (Masters Thesis). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1194123016

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lister, Kelly M. “Aggression and Prosocial Behavior in Adolescents' Internet and Face-To-Face Interactions.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1194123016.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lister, Kelly M. “Aggression and Prosocial Behavior in Adolescents' Internet and Face-To-Face Interactions.” 2007. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lister KM. Aggression and Prosocial Behavior in Adolescents' Internet and Face-To-Face Interactions. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2007. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1194123016.

Council of Science Editors:

Lister KM. Aggression and Prosocial Behavior in Adolescents' Internet and Face-To-Face Interactions. [Masters Thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2007. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1194123016


The Ohio State University

2. Solloway, Tyler. Combining approach-gain and avoid-loss frames increases message effectiveness.

Degree: PhD, Communication, 2014, The Ohio State University

Gain-loss framing has produced inconsistent results in communication (O’Keefe & Jensen, 2006, 2007, 2009). Yet, studies from psychology demonstrate consistent gain-loss message effects (Higgins, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2005). Regulatory focus theory suggests the lack of operational clarity in communication applications may be the one of the reasons for inconsistent results. It is proposed that communication scholars use approach-gain and avoid-loss frames to create effective messages. The dissertation extends regulatory focus theory by arguing (a) frames’ relationship with perceived effectiveness is mediated by attention to the frames, (b) the combination of approach-gain and avoid-loss frames will receive the most attention, when the message has low to moderate arousing content, and (c) the combination of approach-gain and avoid-loss will be most effective. Two within-subjects experiments were conducted, using visual fixations to operationalize attention. Study 1 examined the combination of approach-gain and avoid-loss frames, without manipulating arousing content. Study 2 examined the combination of frames and manipulated arousing content. The two studies revealed that individuals looked the most at approach-gain information, and attention to information did not influence perceived message effectiveness. As predicted, when arousal was controlled for, messages with the combination of approach-gain and avoid-loss frames were perceived as more effective than messages with only one type of frame. Advisors/Committee Members: Wang, Zheng (Joyce) (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Marketing; gain loss framing; approach-gain; avoid-loss; regulatory focus theory; dual motivation theory; decision field theory; arousal; attention to messages; message effectiveness; sensation seeking; prosocial messaging; public service announcements

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Solloway, T. (2014). Combining approach-gain and avoid-loss frames increases message effectiveness. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1417619273

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Solloway, Tyler. “Combining approach-gain and avoid-loss frames increases message effectiveness.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1417619273.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Solloway, Tyler. “Combining approach-gain and avoid-loss frames increases message effectiveness.” 2014. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Solloway T. Combining approach-gain and avoid-loss frames increases message effectiveness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1417619273.

Council of Science Editors:

Solloway T. Combining approach-gain and avoid-loss frames increases message effectiveness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2014. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1417619273

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