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You searched for subject:(predator free). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Lincoln University

1. Gilmore, Shannon Elizabeth-Rose. The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand.

Degree: 2016, Lincoln University

New Zealand (NZ) hosts several introduced mammalian pests that threaten native flora and fauna. Substantial time and money is spent controlling these pest populations with some success, but in order to attain the dream of a predator free NZ we must increase our effectiveness. We already know that nocturnal mammals worldwide alter activity levels in response to moon phase; understanding this behaviour can allow better control of their populations. Little is known as to how NZ’s nocturnal mammalian pest activity levels change with moon phase or nocturnal illumination levels. If we can predict when pests will be most active then the deployment of pest control and monitoring could be more efficient and effective. The main goal of the current study was to determine how moon phase and illumination affect the activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests. The first step in this process was to analyse two large camera trap data sets from the Blue Mountains (Otago) and Hawkes Bay to assess the response of the pests to moon phase (measured illumination data was not available for these data sets). Next, a highly sensitive light meter, a Sky Quality Meter (SQM), was tested in the dark conditions of rural Banks Peninsula (Canterbury) to assess whether it could differentiate illumination levels between moon phases and canopy covers. This device was then used in conjunction with indirect indices of activity, using Waxtags™ and camera traps, on three field sites over three months to assess activity levels. The Banks Peninsula data, as well as data from the Blue Mountains and Hawkes Bay, were analysed using a generalized linear mixed model with a binomial distribution and a logit link function. Moon phase was not able to fully explain the variation in pest activity within the camera trap data (from Hawkes Bay and the Blue Mountains), by including measured illumination levels in the Banks Peninsula study more of the variation in the data set was explained. Overall, the most interesting finding was that illumination does impact nocturnal mammalian pests and appears to affect activity levels more than moon phase or rain. These results suggest that as illumination levels decreased, pest activity levels increased. The second major finding was that SQM’s can detect, even under very dark conditions, significant differences in illumination between moon phases and under different canopy covers. This research has several practical applications. First, SQM’s were found to measure illumination in a biologically relevant way and would be useful in further ecological studies. Second, there was an implication for pest control in that monitoring these pests should be targeted during darker conditions, such as outside of the full moon and under canopy cover. Taking illumination into account may increase the efficiency and effectiveness of monitoring and control, bringing us one step closer to a predator free New Zealand. Advisors/Committee Members: Paterson, Adrian, Ross, James.

Subjects/Keywords: nocturnal mammalian pest; pest; mammal; vertebrate; animal behaviour; illumination; light; moon phase; predator free; control; monitor

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gilmore, S. E. (2016). The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7811

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gilmore, Shannon Elizabeth-Rose. “The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand.” 2016. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed May 21, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7811.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gilmore, Shannon Elizabeth-Rose. “The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand.” 2016. Web. 21 May 2018.

Vancouver:

Gilmore SE. The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. [cited 2018 May 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7811.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gilmore SE. The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7811

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Wesleyan University

2. Johnson, Emily Rae. Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community.

Degree: Biology, 2014, Wesleyan University

Subjects/Keywords: Anti-predator defenses; Enemy-Free Space Hypothesis; Dietary specialization in caterpillars

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, E. R. (2014). Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community. (Masters Thesis). Wesleyan University. Retrieved from https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/etd_mas_theses/67

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Emily Rae. “Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Wesleyan University. Accessed May 21, 2018. https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/etd_mas_theses/67.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Emily Rae. “Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community.” 2014. Web. 21 May 2018.

Vancouver:

Johnson ER. Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Wesleyan University; 2014. [cited 2018 May 21]. Available from: https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/etd_mas_theses/67.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson ER. Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community. [Masters Thesis]. Wesleyan University; 2014. Available from: https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/etd_mas_theses/67


AUT University

3. Omondiagbe, Harriet. How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? .

Degree: AUT University

The field of environmental conservation is experiencing a greater awareness of the social complexities involved when implementing conservation goals, while the process for effectively engaging stakeholders, especially communities, remains challenging. I investigated how engaging a community could aid in developing new conservation initiatives within a pest management context, with the aim of contributing to a Predator Free New Zealand by 2050. This thesis demonstrates the potential for successful collaborations while engaging communities in developing conservation strategies. Firstly, I explored the role of Sense of Place in pest management planning. Next, I identified conservation actors, analysed their relationships and examined the potential for collaboration within their social networks. Lastly, I employed Living Lab principles of value, influence, realism, sustainability and openness to assist stakeholders in developing pest management strategies for their community. I designed the study within a pragmatism paradigm, employing a sequential mixed method approach and involving theories from different disciplines. The study proposed that conservation strategies with minimal or no impact on a community’s sense of place would likely be adopted without strong opposition and vice versa. Stakeholders’ position within their social networks could influence collective action that could favour conservation goals. By engaging communities in conservation planning; conservation goals developed are relevant; public opposition could be minimised; a momentum could be generated for conservation action and there is an increased likelihood that conservation goals would be achieved. The results of this study offer expectation for the feasibility of a predator-free New Zealand; however, the issues identified in this thesis have to be addressed before this expectation can become a reality. Advisors/Committee Members: Bollard-Breen, Barbara (advisor), Towns, Dave (advisor), Wood, Jay (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Social network; Sense of place; Living Laboratory; Predator Free 2050; Predator Free New Zealand; Waiheke Island; Pragmatism; Pest management; Island communities; Community engagement; Applied Conservation; Conservation Biology; Conservation planning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Omondiagbe, H. (n.d.). How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10532

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Omondiagbe, Harriet. “How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed May 21, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10532.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Omondiagbe, Harriet. “How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? .” Web. 21 May 2018.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Omondiagbe H. How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2018 May 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10532.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Omondiagbe H. How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10532

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.