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You searched for subject:(predator free). Showing records 1 – 5 of 5 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Dickie, Lucy. To what extent are young people engaged with the Predator Free 2050 goal? .

Degree: University of Otago

 People have a significant role to play when it comes to predator control. The announcement of the Predator Free 2050 goal (PF2050), in June 2016,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: New Zealand; Young adults; Predator Free 2050; Attitudes to science; Predator control

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dickie, L. (n.d.). To what extent are young people engaged with the Predator Free 2050 goal? . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8203

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dickie, Lucy. “To what extent are young people engaged with the Predator Free 2050 goal? .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed September 25, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8203.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dickie, Lucy. “To what extent are young people engaged with the Predator Free 2050 goal? .” Web. 25 Sep 2018.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Dickie L. To what extent are young people engaged with the Predator Free 2050 goal? . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2018 Sep 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8203.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Dickie L. To what extent are young people engaged with the Predator Free 2050 goal? . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8203

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.


Lincoln University

2. Gilmore, Shannon Elizabeth-Rose. The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand.

Degree: 2016, Lincoln University

 New Zealand (NZ) hosts several introduced mammalian pests that threaten native flora and fauna. Substantial time and money is spent controlling these pest populations with… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: nocturnal mammalian pest; pest; mammal; vertebrate; animal behaviour; illumination; light; moon phase; predator free; control; monitor

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gilmore, S. E. (2016). The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7811

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gilmore, Shannon Elizabeth-Rose. “The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand.” 2016. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed September 25, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7811.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gilmore, Shannon Elizabeth-Rose. “The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand.” 2016. Web. 25 Sep 2018.

Vancouver:

Gilmore SE. The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. [cited 2018 Sep 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7811.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gilmore SE. The influence of illumination and moon phase on activity levels of nocturnal mammalian pests in New Zealand. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/7811

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Wesleyan University

3. Johnson, Emily Rae. Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community.

Degree: Biology, 2014, Wesleyan University

Subjects/Keywords: Anti-predator defenses; Enemy-Free Space Hypothesis; Dietary specialization in caterpillars

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, E. R. (2014). Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community. (Masters Thesis). Wesleyan University. Retrieved from https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/etd_mas_theses/67

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Emily Rae. “Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Wesleyan University. Accessed September 25, 2018. https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/etd_mas_theses/67.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Emily Rae. “Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community.” 2014. Web. 25 Sep 2018.

Vancouver:

Johnson ER. Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Wesleyan University; 2014. [cited 2018 Sep 25]. Available from: https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/etd_mas_theses/67.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson ER. Investigating the Relationship Between Dietary Specialization of Caterpillars and Their Risk of Ant Predation in a Forest Community. [Masters Thesis]. Wesleyan University; 2014. Available from: https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/etd_mas_theses/67


AUT University

4. Omondiagbe, Harriet. How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? .

Degree: AUT University

 The field of environmental conservation is experiencing a greater awareness of the social complexities involved when implementing conservation goals, while the process for effectively engaging… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Social network; Sense of place; Living Laboratory; Predator Free 2050; Predator Free New Zealand; Waiheke Island; Pragmatism; Pest management; Island communities; Community engagement; Applied Conservation; Conservation Biology; Conservation planning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Omondiagbe, H. (n.d.). How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10532

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Omondiagbe, Harriet. “How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed September 25, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10532.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Omondiagbe, Harriet. “How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? .” Web. 25 Sep 2018.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Omondiagbe H. How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2018 Sep 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10532.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Omondiagbe H. How Can Engaging Communities Aid in Developing New Conservation Initiatives? . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10532

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.


University of Otago

5. Tweed, James Michael Hampden. The response of moth communities to ecosystem restoration .

Degree: University of Otago

 Ecosystems and biodiversity worldwide have been heavily degraded as a result of anthropogenic activity and the need for the restoration of these degraded ecosystems is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Ecosystem restoration; Moths; Succession; Pest control; Predator free; Ecosanctuary; Community structure; Community composition; Ecological indicator; Lepidoptera; Erebidae; Geometridae; Hepialidae; Noctuidae

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tweed, J. M. H. (n.d.). The response of moth communities to ecosystem restoration . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8151

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tweed, James Michael Hampden. “The response of moth communities to ecosystem restoration .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed September 25, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8151.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tweed, James Michael Hampden. “The response of moth communities to ecosystem restoration .” Web. 25 Sep 2018.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Tweed JMH. The response of moth communities to ecosystem restoration . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2018 Sep 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8151.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Tweed JMH. The response of moth communities to ecosystem restoration . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8151

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

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