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You searched for subject:(postsecondary transition programs). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Northeastern University

1. Sacco, Christine Marie. An approach to postsecondary writing programs:: evaluating perceptions of self-identified students with disabilities.

Degree: EdD, School of Education, 2014, Northeastern University

The purpose of this study was to identify perceptions of writing and motivation in seeking academic assistance from self-identified students with learning disabilities in a 4-year public postsecondary institution.; Additionally, identification of strengths and weaknesses in writing was pursued as a means of assisting writing centers to create effective writing programs in postsecondary institutions for students who experience difficulty in writing. Self-identified students with disabilities were appropriate participants for this study because these particular students have an awareness of their disability, their academic needs, and their areas of strengths and weaknesses in various disciplines. Areas identified by the sample size may be applied to other students who experience difficulty in writing within the institution.; In order to recognize factors contributing to motivation and identification, a literature review was conducted to evaluate components of common practices in the postsecondary writing process. Components included (a) identifying disabilities, (b) defining self-identification, and (c) defining self-determination. Additionally, understanding the various academic support services available to students was acknowledged, particularly disabilities service centers and writing centers. To understand the academic process of postsecondary basic writers and the cause of the disconnect between secondary and postsecondary writing curriculums, a definition of underprepared students needed to be established. Similarly, descriptions of poor writing skills, secondary education writing scores, and common writing challenges were evaluated.; Qualitative research methods were used through semi-structured interviews to obtain information regarding participant experiences. Themes emerged from findings and included (a) goal orientation, (b) identification of postsecondary writing expectations, (c) self-awareness of strengths and weaknesses, and (d) motivational factors contributing to academic success. Finally, although limitations were identified and suggestions were made for future research, results from participant responses proved consistent with research presented from past studies.

Subjects/Keywords: college writing; developmental programs; postsecondary transition; special needs; writing; writing centers; Education; Higher Education; Special Education and Teaching; English language; Composition and exercises; Study and teaching (Higher); Composition (Language arts); Study and teaching (Higher); Rhetoric; Study and teaching (Higher); Writing centers; Learning disabled; Education (Higher); Services for; College students with disabilities; Services for

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sacco, C. M. (2014). An approach to postsecondary writing programs:: evaluating perceptions of self-identified students with disabilities. (Masters Thesis). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20018702

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sacco, Christine Marie. “An approach to postsecondary writing programs:: evaluating perceptions of self-identified students with disabilities.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Northeastern University. Accessed August 13, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20018702.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sacco, Christine Marie. “An approach to postsecondary writing programs:: evaluating perceptions of self-identified students with disabilities.” 2014. Web. 13 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Sacco CM. An approach to postsecondary writing programs:: evaluating perceptions of self-identified students with disabilities. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. [cited 2020 Aug 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20018702.

Council of Science Editors:

Sacco CM. An approach to postsecondary writing programs:: evaluating perceptions of self-identified students with disabilities. [Masters Thesis]. Northeastern University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20018702

2. Brown, Kirsten Ruth. Institutional Practices that Support Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Postsecondary Educational Setting.

Degree: PhD, Higher Education Administration, 2012, Bowling Green State University

Almost 11% of college students have a disability (Newman, Wagner, Cameto, Knokey, & Shaver, 2010). Existing research indicates that students with disabilities have difficulty with retention and graduation (Newman, Wagner, Cameto, & Knokey, 2009). Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a type of disability that has increased among students in secondary education (Rice, 2009), yet the prevalence of students with ASD in postsecondary education is just starting to be documented. Information about programs, services, and reasonable accommodations in higher education that support students with ASD remains incomplete. This study applied a mixed-methods approach to a randomly selected national sample of postsecondary institutions to provide insight into effective interventions that support students with ASD. This study used a web-based survey and yielded a 41.9% return rate. Findings indicate that a “base level” of support exists at the vast majority of institutions. Additionally, 28.3% of institutions offered ASD specific services free-of-charge; whereas 2.2% provided ASD specific services for an additional fee. This research revealed significant differences in the number of students with ASD by institution type; however, there were no significant differences in the provision of ASD specific programs. Fifty-five to sixty percent of institutions used workshops, in-services, or online information to educate faculty regarding ASD specific issues. Logistical regression models indicated that existing programs are the strongest predictors of whether or not an institution offers ASD specific services and educates faculty regarding ASD issues. Successful interventions that support students with ASD educate community members (e.g., residence life staff), target ASD specific issues (e.g., transition), and address the institutional culture (e.g., diversity on campus). Successful interventions also have a proactive purpose and honor the value criterion of equity. Pitfalls to avoid when designing interventions include “one-size-fits-all” programs. Practitioners must carefully consider cost, feasibility, and political support for neurodiversity. Institutions without ASD specific programs support students by using existing reasonable accommodations or general services. Implications of the findings and recommendations for future research are discussed. Notably, future research should consider exploring the effectiveness of transition programs to support students with ASD. Advisors/Committee Members: Coomes, Michael (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Education Policy; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration; Autism Spectrum Disorder; ASD; postsecondary; higher education; services; reasonable accommodations; mixed-methods; web-based survey; ASD specific services; ASD education; one-size-fits-all; transition programs; Aspergers; neurodiversity

…26 Legal Transition Between K-12 and Postsecondary Education ..................... 28… …75 Existing Postsecondary Interventions and Programs… …245 Transition programs… …reported intending to finish their programs, when students left their postsecondary schools fewer… …important for postsecondary institutions to understand and develop programs or interventions that… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brown, K. R. (2012). Institutional Practices that Support Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Postsecondary Educational Setting. (Doctoral Dissertation). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1332120965

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Kirsten Ruth. “Institutional Practices that Support Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Postsecondary Educational Setting.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Bowling Green State University. Accessed August 13, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1332120965.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Kirsten Ruth. “Institutional Practices that Support Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Postsecondary Educational Setting.” 2012. Web. 13 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Brown KR. Institutional Practices that Support Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Postsecondary Educational Setting. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2012. [cited 2020 Aug 13]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1332120965.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown KR. Institutional Practices that Support Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Postsecondary Educational Setting. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2012. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1332120965

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