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You searched for subject:(peace builder). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Manitoba

1. Creary, Patlee. The “mailed fist” and the “velvet glove”: A hermeneutic phenomenological study of Canadian soldiers’ roles and identity in peace support operations.

Degree: Peace and Conflict Studies, 2017, University of Manitoba

This study makes an original contribution to the peace and conflict studies literature by examining Canadian military experiences with peace builder roles. The goal of the research is to understand if, and how, Canadian soldiers transition from trained warrior to expected peace builder in international peace operations deployments. I use peace agency, third side roles, and citizen empowerment as well as ideas about ontological agency, military transmutation and cultural inversion to create a comprehensive conceptual framework for understanding the experiences of twelve former Canadian soldiers. The soldiers were deployed to international peace support missions in the former Yugoslavia, the Balkans, and Afghanistan between 1990 and 2014. Using hermeneutic phenomenological inquiry, I highlight the Canadian soldiers’ spatial, temporal, material, corporeal, and relational experiences of encounters with a peace support role, military identity, and the concept of peace in international peace support deployments. In addition to uncovering new understandings of soldiers’ experiences in peace operations, the research shows that informal peace builder roles, creating a safe space, and engaging in micro-level contact with the local lived other are relevant aspects of these soldiers’ encounters with peace. The findings of this research have implications for the way that practitioners and researchers think about peace operations, military-other contact, and intervener neutrality. In addition to identifying areas for further investigation based on the new understandings, the study highlights the importance of validating informal third side roles for soldiers in international peace operations. Advisors/Committee Members: Byrne, Sean (Peace and Conflict Studies) (supervisor), Flaherty, Maureen (Peace and Conflict Studies).

Subjects/Keywords: Canadian soldiers; peace operations; peacebuilding; peace builder; phenomenology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Creary, P. (2017). The “mailed fist” and the “velvet glove”: A hermeneutic phenomenological study of Canadian soldiers’ roles and identity in peace support operations. (Thesis). University of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32996

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Creary, Patlee. “The “mailed fist” and the “velvet glove”: A hermeneutic phenomenological study of Canadian soldiers’ roles and identity in peace support operations.” 2017. Thesis, University of Manitoba. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32996.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Creary, Patlee. “The “mailed fist” and the “velvet glove”: A hermeneutic phenomenological study of Canadian soldiers’ roles and identity in peace support operations.” 2017. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Creary P. The “mailed fist” and the “velvet glove”: A hermeneutic phenomenological study of Canadian soldiers’ roles and identity in peace support operations. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2017. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32996.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Creary P. The “mailed fist” and the “velvet glove”: A hermeneutic phenomenological study of Canadian soldiers’ roles and identity in peace support operations. [Thesis]. University of Manitoba; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1993/32996

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


AUT University

2. Kilpatrick, Robert. The Business of Peace-building: Redeeming the Entrepreneurial Spirit for Reconciliation .

Degree: AUT University

What would happen if some of humanity’s entrepreneurs changed, from a life motivated largely by planning and working for personal autonomy, flexibility and wealth creation, to the business of peace-building and the development of communities of shalom, human flourishing and well-being? This thesis examines the characteristics of people it identifies as peace-builders, involved at a community level, and compares them, their values, worldview and praxis, with the well-documented research into what this thesis calls ‘the entrepreneurial spirit’. The similarities and differences between those groups are explored within the framework of three themes, namely: • Theme 1: In what ways are the worldviews/values of peace-builders similar to or different from those of entrepreneurs? • Theme 2: In what ways do the leadership styles of peace-builders align with those who have succeeded in building an entrepreneurial business? • Theme 3: What reciprocal influences do the peace-builder and their communities have on each other? Exploring an area where a dearth of literature fails to advance an understanding of the processes that shift the potential entrepreneur’s primary focus from autonomy to the business of peace-building and the community context in which it occurs, this research points to key concepts that assist in that journey. Through both qualitative and quantitative inquiry in Armenia and Myanmar, each with different histories, cultures, philosophies and economies, the thesis examines the worldviews/values of peace-builders and the societal factors that might lead entrepreneurs being drawn into the business of peace-building. It explores why the worldview/values peace-builders embrace enable them to see an alternative future to that held by most of the people in the communities in which they, as peace-builders, live, and how those values help them lead others to a future of reconciliation and community well-being. By seeking insights into the peace-builders’ motivations, their cultural heroes and mentors, and their views of the issues that spark violence and methodological approaches to peace-building, the thesis aims to encourage reflection on peace-builder’s leadership styles, and the reciprocal influences between them and their communities. Using the lens of peace-building as a business, it encourages existential and ontological consideration of their work by using a phenomenological framework of radical humanism. Conflating ‘for profit’ and ‘social entrepreneurship’ enterprises, this research analyses peace-builders by pointing to those characteristics identified as seminal by the peace-builders themselves: the value of struggle, kenosis-based servant leadership, and the development of value-based education regarding respect for ‘the other’. The thesis concludes by suggesting a possible path for the structural review of business entities – particularly corporate structures, community activity and educational events to increase the number of peace-builders and outlines further areas of inquiry on peace-building… Advisors/Committee Members: Pio, Edwina (advisor), LeFevre, Mark (advisor), Wieland, George (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Peace-builder; Business; Entrepreneur; Kenosis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kilpatrick, R. (n.d.). The Business of Peace-building: Redeeming the Entrepreneurial Spirit for Reconciliation . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10580

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kilpatrick, Robert. “The Business of Peace-building: Redeeming the Entrepreneurial Spirit for Reconciliation .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10580.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kilpatrick, Robert. “The Business of Peace-building: Redeeming the Entrepreneurial Spirit for Reconciliation .” Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Kilpatrick R. The Business of Peace-building: Redeeming the Entrepreneurial Spirit for Reconciliation . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10580.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Kilpatrick R. The Business of Peace-building: Redeeming the Entrepreneurial Spirit for Reconciliation . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10580

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.